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Full text of "The Games Machine Magazine Issue 22"

A NEWSFtELD PUBLICATION 



£1.50 

US$3.75 



i 




COMPUTER LEISURE ENTERTAINMENT ■ 7x022 



SEPT 1 989 



I 



\) 



\ 



Now an Amiga can be 
an IBM or a Macintosh 
and so can an Atari ST 

THE LATEST ON EMULATION 

1S?ID CRANE 



Pitfall to Little Computer 
People — now TGM has 
the lowdown or* 
A Boy and 
His Blob 




At last 
IT'S HE 

16.7 MILLION COl r ,0 

on your Atari ST 

and soon for the Amiga and PC 

with the PARSEC GRAPHICS INTERFACE 

Advanced Amiga digitising Coin-Ops Playing Tips Hardware Guide Adventure Strategy Reviews Previews 



Some of the hottest titles of recent month«ar< 

of an exciting new range of ccnp 
All four will be available dirii 
with more Chapters planned for leer 




VOL 1 16 BIT 

• IKARI WARRIORS 

• BUGGY BOY 

• BEYOND THE 
ICE PALACE 

• BATTLESHIPS 



/' 






V 



I 




J) 




VOL 2 3 BIT 
• SPAC 



• LIVE 'N LET DIE 

• OVERLANDER 

• BEYOND THE 
ICE PALACE 

• HOPPING MAD 



I 



i 



ISHEEL 




ELITE SYSTEMS LTDrBNCHOR HOUSE, ANCOR 



t 



AM » 
I 



thsare featured in these first four "Chapters 
compilations from Elite. 
b Qring this Summer 
r ker this year and early next year. 




COMPHATIQH 




VOL 4 8 BIT 
> GHOST BUSTERS 

• ALIENS 
WONDER BOY 
EIDELON 

• BACK TO THE 
FUTURE 

" QUARTET 




NCOR ROAD, ALDRIDGE, WALSALL, WS9 8 




F- Wj w» Q 



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TGM NEWS AND PREVIEWS 

Stuff that happened — stuff that will, plus latest news 
on Forthcoming game releases lor all formats 

CONFRONTATION: COIN-OP 

Four brand new arcade games inlcuding Golden Axe, 
plus Christmas coin-op conversions to expect 

9fi ROBIN CANDY'S PLAYING TIPS 

■"* Three pages of all-format tips, hints, POKEs and maps 

THE ADVENTURE COLUMN 

More from the wiz with adventures, strategy games and 
computer RPGs 



REVIEW CATALOGUE 

The latest all -format games reviews 



puter magazines are getting increasingly s 
rerybody places their bets on ST or An 
_ of the leisure market; and even within ti 

ting on EITHER games OR the more serio 
is though magazine publishers regarc 
?rs as stuck in claustrophobic pigecn-hcl 
we Ve always regarded compL . un, whe 

aying the Latest blast-'em-up on the Spectrum ■ 
*ut a page on a Mac Ilex and drawing a suit 
og to brighten up a features page using A 
Orator, Computer users do move from ap 
ang a fanzine on your Spectrum perhaps) tc 
games for relaxation. That's why TGM covers ev 
"* we're proud that — be it review or an ar. 
r software on an Amiga — what you reac 
led and tested by experts and the writing a 
** That's why you buy TGM — that's v 
hoe* <*n«n M jj n g years are yet to com.; 



AN EYE ON 
FUTUI 



■••■j 



•COL 



I ST — The Parsec 
1 million on page * 




igh 



MADE IN TECHNICOLOR 

We were 18 months ahead of ourselves, but at last 
Etmtecrf s amazing Parsec graphics Interface for the 
Atari ST is here 

A MAN AND HIS BLOB 

It's been a long while, but David crane, one of the 
world's most acclaimed games programmers, is back 
with A Soy and his Blob — and he talked only to TGM 

AN IDIOT'S GUIDE... 

Behind the scenes with Ruth Pracy and the marketing 
people who gel your games onto the shelves 

PLAY BY MAIL &... 

FANTASY GAMES 

OUR MAN IN JAPAN 

Shintaro Kanaoya examines the oriental console scene 

ATARI ST USA 

Marshal M Rosenthal visits two ST shows in the States 
1o see what's coming our way in the next tew months 

RIBBETING STUFF 

Bullfrog hit the headlines with Populous, so TGM visit- 
ed to see what this dynamic programming team are up 
to next 



ENTRE BYTES AND Wl 



k I 



Make your ST or Amiga into a Mac or a PC ■ Running 
high-end Mac packages on the Amiga ■ Advanced 
Amiga digitising ■ The definitive 8-bit hardware guide 
plus the usual essential features 



The original Sleinar Lund painting for Tengen/Domark's 
Xybots, plus copies ot the game for ST, Amiga, C64, Spectrum 
or Amstrad M Page 71 
PLUS: Yet another TGM Hotline CI ,0O0 cash prize! 



TGM 1X022:9-89 5 





-%Vij*i\ 







J I Il\ ft 



■MsaJSiaalH^mrtiii^sg^ 





THE CHAMP 

Endorse by the WORLD BOXING COUNCIL, THE CHAMP is 

simply the most real i stic boxing simulation ever written for 
the computer: 

- With the original 'Rocky' theme tune - 

- More than 1 300 Frames of animation - 

- One or two player mode - 
A Booklet with the histiry and rules of boxing - 
- Keyring with mini boxing gloves - 
and a lot more. No surprise that everyone is enthusiastic 
about it: TILT HIT in France, SMASH GOLDMEDAL in Ger- 
many ... a great simulation. 
Maw available for Amiga soon out on Atari ST, C64, 
Amstrad and Spectrum 



SKATE OF THE ART 

The crazy game for all Skateboard fang 

Out on the Amiga from mid July. 
Don't miss it... 



Distributed by 

50RWAAE SUCCESS MAFtKEHNG LTU 

Alban House 

24a White Pit Lane 

Flackwell heath 

Mr High Wycombe 

Buckinghamshire HP10 9HR 



IL^ 



r~L 



~L 




LINEL Products MERIMPEX Ltd 

Am Schragen W'eg 2, 9490 Vaduz 

Principality of Liechtenstein 

Tel: 01041 75 283 68 

Fax: 01041 75 206 56 



News 



NEWS 




PREVIEWS 



GUNNING FOR 
A MARKET 



After the luke warm reception 

to the Sinclair Lightgun, 
Cheetah are planning to bun- 
die with their new lightgun, 
the Defender, six specially 
designed games from top 
budget software house Code 
Masters. Keen not to disap- 
point, as the Sinclair version 
has, Code Masters are plac- 
ing 'a crack team of top pro- 
grammers' on the job. 

The games are Super 
Tranz-Am (race across 




America); Bronx Street 

Cop {stages, from train 
mg in the rifle range to 
stopping bank robberies) ; 
Harrier Attack (only a work 
ing title for a game similar to 
MiG 29): Billy the Kid [fast 
draw shooting, partner); 
Jungle Warfare (another 
working title for a game simi- 
lar to Green Beret); and a 
new version of Advanced 



Pinball Simulator rewritten by 
the Oliver Twins. 

One interesting point about 
the Defender lightgun is its 
design. Sinclair specifically 
designed their gun to look 
futuristic, avoiding any com- 
plications when selling it in 
Germany — where such 
items, like computer games, 
are subject to stringent con 
trols. However, Cheetah's ver 
sion appears much more real- 
istic, and 
seeing as 
they're 
also pro- 
ducing a 
061 ver- 
sion, 
they 

may find 
some diffi- 
culty in sell- 
ing it to the 
lucrative C64 
market in West Germany, 

Look out for a full review of 
the Cheetah Defender, and its 
games, next month... 



Silent STE 



It's confirmed, the Atari STE 
does exist. 

However, Atari aren't wav- 
ing flags and blowing bugles 
to announce its arrival During 
a recent trip around all the 

major software houses. Atari 
were conspicuous for their 
absence of furore. One soft- 
ware manager from a top soft- 
ware house commented: 'All 
they did was bring it in, show 
us what it does extra and go. 



No fuss or anything ' 

So perhaps Atari are admit- 
ting defeat in the ST/Amiga 
war* 5 Over 70 development 
machines have already gone 
out to software houses. 

The new STE {to be 
launched at the PC Show in 
September)., which will retail 
for the same price as the pre- 
sent ST (€399, but no soft- 
ware), features a new sound 
chip with stereo sound, and 



Z^ 



Sneaking in so silently no-one 
may even no tice: is it an old 
ST or a new STE? 



^JVfARI 



Second sight, double vision 



While people are going ga-ga 
at the Game Boy and prepare 
to go crazy over the Konix — 
not to mention the hand-held 
Atari, now christened the 
Lynx — distributors Palan, of 
East London, are set to blow 
the dust off the aged Coieco 
Vision console. 

The CBS machine was 
released at the beginning of 
the decade, during the era of 
the Atari VCS and 
In television, but failed to 
make an impact in the console 
market or slow the embryonic 
but fast growing home com- 
puter industry. 

With supplies of the Coieco 
available from abroad, partic- 
ularly the Far East, Palan see 
a potential new market for the 
decidedly Seventies-looking 
machine. With a retail price 
tag of £50 in mind — a fifth of 



the original price — Palan are 
waiting for trade response 

before committing themselves 
to a probable September 
(re) launch. 

The old, but classic and 
accurately converted. Donkey 
Kong is likely to be bundled 
with the Coieco and there are 
some 100 other cartridges 
readily available from various 
parts of the world 

It's a shame that Palan 
won't be dealing with Coieco 
peripherals (even going as far 
as blocking off the expansion 
port); for racing games, there 
exists a steering wheel and 
brake pedal, originally 
launched at the same tune as 
the Coieco — the Konix con- 
sole's ambitious control 
devices aren't as original as 
many people believe 

Though the Coieco Vision is 



undoubtedly a quality 

macliine — it could give the 
8-bit Sega and Nintendo a run 
for their money — there are 
too many new and more 
advanced consoles and com- 
puters on the market and in 
the pipeline E50 is a nice 
price for the Coieco but this 
1979/60 machine is unlikely 
to gain a stronger following 
than it did during its youth 



improved graphics features 
with 4096 colours, faster han- 
dling of scrolls and genlock 
capabilities 

The new STE is compatible 
with the old, and even looks 
the same. In fact an Atari 
spokesman informed TGM 
that they may even put the 
new STE in the recent 
Powerpack bundle without 
even telling anyone, thus 
starting the phasing out of 
the old model. 

Like the Spectrum 128K, 
software houses have 
pledged their support tot the 
new model, although games 
presently in production will 
not have enhancements. 



Showdown 



It's that time of the year. 

Usually there's only one com- 
puter show to be seen at; the 
Personal Computer Show at 
Earls Court. However, this 
year there's three dates for 
your diary. 



Although criticised last year 
for lacking any decent launch- 
es — in both the leisure and 
business halls — the PC Show 
(September 27-Qctober l, Karis 
Court) is back with a bang, 
rumouring launches of the STE 
with a basketful of games 
releases (probably the same 
ones promised last year). 



TGM 1X022:9-89 7 




Another whopper show? 

The Computer Shopper 
Show (November 24-26, 
Alexandra Palace) makes its 
debut this year. At first look it 
may seem like another 
Microfair or Atari Show H but a 
closer examination of who's 
exhibiting reveals a number 
of majors; Acorn, Amstrad, 
Commodore. They'll be a 
bevy of people to answer you 
queries, a programmers' chal- 
lenge and loads of special 
offers on hardware and soft 
ware (mostly consisting of 
'serious" sort). 

And, as if that's not enough 
show-ing off, there's the 
Third Alternative Micro Show 
and Electronics Fair based at 
Bingley Hall on Staffordshire 
Show Ground (November 11). 
Famed for covering almost 
every computer (except the 
Amiga, ST and PC), the 
AMSEF is a great place for 
meeting fellow owners and 
picking up the odd bargain. 




This TV series is dead. It has ceased to be. 

possible last* 

:ompu1 



il the 





First there was Wonderboy 
(Activision chart hit of sum- 
mer '87), then appeared 
Super Wonderboy. and finally 
Wonderboy 3; Monster Land. 
Next month sees the release 
of the second in the series, on 
all formats from Activision. A 
now matured hero, Tom-Tom 
is once again called into 
action as the livelihood of 
Wonderland's inhabitants is 
threatened by a dastardly 
dragon. 

hi comic strip fashion you 
have four types of armour 
and shield, and another four 



types of boots. There are also 
many treasures to collect 
along the way. including; 
gauntlets, helmets, shields 
and amazing winged boots 
(up, up and away). As in its 
close relative Super Mario 
Bros, you'll also come upon 
hidden doors, revealing tav- 



erns, hospitals and even t 
tune tellers (ST screen.) 

They're mean, they're mad. 
they're Dynamite Dux. 
Anchacha the Great has cap- 
tured Lucy, who else to call 
but her closest friends. Bin 
and Pin, that dashing duck 
due 










Super Wonderboy (above) and 
Dynamite Dux (right) rampag 
Ing on the Atari ST 



8TGMTX022:9-89 







Pr&vi&ws 




Here's a collection of the latest Sierra Online 
games, as seen in an exclusive preview to 
our American writer, Marshal M Rosenthal 
who wrote more background information on 
them in last month's adventure section. {All 
photos on IBM PC, and by Marshal M 
Rosenthal.) 



Hoyle's Book 
of Games 

Hoyle's Book is a wend collec- 
tion of eight wonderful table- 
top games. Keeping an eye on 
your opponents' antics is 
often as important as keeping 
an eye on your own cards 
(which are not as inanimate 
as they may seem!]. 

King Arthur 
and the Search 
for the Holy Grail 

You quest, my son, is to find 
the fabled Holy Grail. To help 
(and hinder) you on your 
quest may I introduce you to 



Filled with comic ele- 
ments and non-stop surpris- 
es, Dynamite Dux contains 
six levels, two bonus levels, 
and — Amiga and ST only — 
a two-player option for dou- 
ble the fun Dux is to be 
available on all formats, and 
ready for release in 
September, (ST screen.) 

Altered Beast has been 
'kicking' around the arcades 
for over a year now, and it's 
about time we all saw a 
computer version. Acti vision 
have taken up the opportu- 
nity with open arms (and 
pockets). The graphics on all 
versions certainly look good, 
but will it still be playable? 
Fmd out on all formats soon. 
(C64 screen.) 






— "~^^ 








Altered Beast makes it onto 
the Commodore 64 {above) 



Guinevere. Sir Lancelot. 

Merlin and your old friend 
Excalibur. 

Designed by cartoon writers 
and animators, King Arthur is 
an animated adventure featur- 
ing arcade sequences. 
Pictured here is the sequence 
where you must do battle 
with the Black Knight. 

Co loners 
Bequest 

Take parts of Mel Brooks and 
Agatha Christie and this is 
what you've got: a 1920s mur- 
der mystery set in the 
grounds of a large mansion. A 
new feature in Bequest is- that 
everything happens in real- 
time — things happen regard- 
less of whether you're there to 
watch them. Nimble feet are 
required' 

Codename: 



ice Man 



As Johnny Westland, US Navy 

SEAL, you must take control 
of a submarine and rescue an 
American ambassador held 
hostage in North Africa. 
Animation is involving, featur- 
ing special windows that 
appear at the top of the screen 
adding extra information 
There are three types of per- 
spective: closeups, medium 
and far shots. Although most- 
ly adventure and simulation, 
there are a few arcade sec- 
tions, as shown here with the 
dice scene. 



Sierra on lineup, top to bottom: gaming 
with Hoyle, The Colonel's Bequest, two 
from the Ice Man, and Arthur on the 
Grail (right and below) 




TGM TX 022:9-89 9 



Tell me a story 



After a lull of two or three 

months, while they sorted out 
what's going on what label, 
the Tetbury -based conglom- 
erate, known as Firebird. 
Rainbud, MicroProse etc.... 
have unveiled their plans lor 
tons of future releases, 

The eagerly-awaited fol- 
low-up game from Geoff 
Crammond (author of 
Sentinel) has finally arrived, 
under the guise of Stunt Car 
Racer. 





As a world-renowned rac- 
ing driver you must steer 
your car through eight chal- 
lenging tracks in each of four 
divisions. However, your car 
ls one hot pile of metal and 
requires skill and restraint to 
guide it over bridges and 
jumps, and round obstacles. 
From the moment you're low- 
ered by crane onto the track, 
you know that this is not just 
another simulation game 

Stunt Car Racer is for all 
you young trendies out there, 
so it'll be on the ever-so-cool 
MicroStyle label, All formats 
are expected in September, 
with ST and Amiga versions 
allowing you to connect two 
computers together for simul- 
taneous play. 

Originally titled 

Government Form Simulator, 
the arcade conversion of the 
flying shoot-'em-up, P-47, is 



Above and below; truncheon-wielding 
action in Rainbow Warrior from 
MicroProse 

with the global 
preservation organisa 
tion Greenpeace — 
Rainbow Warrior. Get 
past those truncheon- 
wielding flatfoots, 
stop those evil seal 
cullers and give a 
whole new meaning 
to the Save the uni- 
verse" storyline. 
Definitely one of the 
most attractive games 
previewed this month, 
you can expect 
Rainbow Warrior in 
September on all for- 
mats. (ST pictured.) 



We all know that 
two-player programs 
add an extra dimen- 
sion, so Xenophobe, 
with its split-screen 
play (first seen in Spy 
vs Spy's Simulvision}, 
is eagerly awaited 
here at TGM. All for- 
mats feature the eye- 
catching technique, 
as well as some 
Alien-type characters 
aboard your star ship. 
(ST screen.) 




Double trouble with Alien-style graph- 
ics as monsters come at you from all 
angles in the latest two-player game, 
Xenophobe 




Top; Stunt Car Racer, above; 
conversion of arcade hit, P-47 

almost complete. Pictured on 
the ST, is should be available 
on all formats soon. 

From MicroProse, the com- 
pany that brought you 
Gunship, Stealth Fighter and 
many many more war simula- 
tions comes — in conjunction 



Every picture 
tells a story 

You don't have to be an 

award-winning artist to 

play Domark's follow-up 

to the top-selling Trivial 

Pursuit, Pictionary. All 

that's needed is a quick 

hand and a vivid imagi 

nation. Flick through 

many drawing utilities 

and sketch out a rough 

design that will give 

your friends a clue to the 

word. It's a bit like charades (Amiga 

vrith pictures . mayalter.) 



Info 



Without one sighting of 
Patrick Swayze. Infogrames' 
next wargaming extravagan- 
za is North and South — 
described by the French com- 
pany as 'a game of strategy, 
tactics and arcade', with an 
emphasis on strategy. The 
story of the American Civil 
War of the 1960s , North and 
South allows you to play 
either side, against a com- 
puter or human opponent 

In order to recruit armies 
you must acquire taxes (in 
the form of gold) which are 
transported across America 
on trains. Of course, control- 
ling a few railway stations 
will help your pursuit of said 
taxes. Get your hands on five 





Top and above. all-Ameriean 
heroes apply to hifogramea' 
latest game. North and South 

sacks of gold and a new 
army is yours, all ready and 
waiting to gain your victory. 

Arcade elements rear their 
heads in the battle scenes 
where you take control three 
types sections of your army: 
artillery, cavalry and infantry 
Obviously, certain sections 
are suited to certain move- 
ments And if that's not 
enough, there's also those 
pesky Mexicans to deal 




screen. 



Graphics 



While the French celebrate their revc 
lution. Infogrames release North and 
South (Atari ST pictures} 



10TGMTX022:9-89 



Previews 



) 



grames info 




Running for your life ... 

with... 
Only on the ST, Amiga and 

PC, North and South should 

be available in October. 
In mfogrames' Iron 

Trackers you're running for 
your life, liter- 
ally! You are 
placed on Iron 
Island, where 
the master of 
the island's 
favourite sport 




is Man-hunting! 
However. the 

rewards are high. 
so — stricken with 
poverty and 

depression — you 
volunteer yourself. 
Before the contest 
you must equip 

yourself with cer- 
tain attributes. Do 
you want strength 
or speed? And what sort of 
weapon d'you fancy? 

All you have to do is cross 
from one side of the island to 
the other — there are no 
rules I Along the track there 
are traders who will supply 
you with extra munitions for 
your chosen weapon. Filled 
with laughter and suspense. 
Iron Trackers is available on 
ST and Amiga in September. 
[ST screen) 

The year is 19B3. You are at 
the forefront of a ground {and 



nd 




space) breaking explo- 
ration trip — at the con- 
trols of the rocket head- 
ed for the moon! Good 
luck, Tintin! 

Before you even set 
down on the moon, you 
must pilot your way 
through meteor show- 
ers, take evasive action 
to thwart your competi- 
tors plans to sabotage 
your mission, and successful- 
ly complete a complex entry 
and landing procedure. When 
on the moon, keep an eye on 
your faithful companions 
Snowy, Captain Haddock, 
Professor Calculus and Woolf. 
the engineer, The evil Colonel 
Boris will try to capture them 
all, sabotage the ship and pre- 
vent your return to earth. 

It's intergalactic action all 
the way Tintin is available on 
all major formats this autumn. 




(ST screen.} 

Also new from Infogrames 
is their first ever roleplaymg 
game. RPOs are even bigger 
in France than they are here, 
so expect Drakkhen to con- 
tain every feature imaginable 
It's taken five of France's top 
programmers, artists and 
designers a whole year to 
develop, and contains a 
plethora of rooms, monsters 
and spells Coming soon on 
the PC, Amiga and ST. 



RPG action and outer space adventure with 
Drakkhen (top) and Tintin (above and right) 




Tell 'em about the mumm 



Rainbow Arts, producers of 



top-notch arcade games, are ty as you try to unravel the 

about to surprise everyone conundrum. Jump in your 
by releasing Mystery of the chauffeur-driven car (your 



Mummy — an adventure! 



>< 1 >' -j*> to Clh«- 
v!..*Vir, V-Uil Mtllwlli t-.i<hoi*Y 
shockpil A* he looked at )ils u.Uiiti. 
"Tli* Komi MIP Mil Ttu*S 

in Mi i. mi. hi f.iu.ii-1-fnj... 

It srill br siTfl* if imj nake if. 




Detective skills are a ne 



employer's not poor! ) and use 
it to travel to any of 136 loca- 
tion in Hamburg and question 
people Yuki've only five d 
to solve the mystery, and time 
is running out! The game con- 
tains over sixty original 
graphics drawn in charcoal 
and then digitised to coniput 
er, thus the strange sepia 
tones in the ST screen, 
Through these, Rainbow Art* 
feel they can convey the 
antique atmosphere of 1 
Hamburg. Available on th 
C64. ST, Amiga and IBM PC... 

BOOH 




>t»m*v, i*. 



491 n 



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>■••■ at th* 
habtv ■••4CH 
••r bat ■•tedv 



Note the sepia tones that convey an 'antique atmosphere' 



TGM TX 022:9-89 11 



Previews 




Hewson onslaught 




Hewson's latest 16-bit shock- 
er Onslaught, programmed 
by Chris Hinsley and Nigel 
Brownjohn (of Verminator and 
Custodian fame), is set in the 
Says ot knights and 
bloodthirsty warriors. As a 
peaceful sort of chap your 
task is to destroy the warring 



factions that are pulling the 
many kingdoms apart, and 
take control of all the land 
(meglomaniac}, 

The whole game is set on a 
campaign map with ten king- 
doms (each with 2E6 
locations). In true roleplaying 
fashion, travel over many 



types of terrains [some need a 
talisman), and encounter 
cults, cavalry, carpets and 
cannons. 

There are a variety of 
undead 1 who must be treated 
with caution — especially the 
Dark Rider. And you can come 
up against four types of oppo- 



nent in desperate mind duets 
There's also the risk that a 
territory already governed by 
you might rebel 

Onslaught is a truly epic 
adventure (even allowing you 
to create and save your own 
kingdoms ! } , November 

release on Amiga and ST. 



Aboard the Ocean liner 



Looks a bit familiar, doesn't it? 
Well, it seems that even the 
great Ocean can't miss out on 
a good thing whan it comes 
along With Hawk, Bomber and 
more Falcon Mission Disks 
about to be launched, the 
flavour of the season is defi- 
nitely flight. 

With most of the US An 
Force planes already snapped 
up for simulation, Ocean have 
plumped for the futuristic F-29 
Gruman prototype, Presently 
tided F-29 Retaliator. the game 
features a high proportion of 
strategy, as well as the usual 



dogfight sequences 

Programmed by Digital 
Images lm fact one of the pro- 
grammers helped on the 16- 
bit skyward hit, Falcon). 
Retaliator is set for a 16-bit- 
only takeoff soon. 

Ocean are hoping their lat- 
est Taito coin-op conversion 
will succeed Operation Wolf 
in being the year's Christmas 
number one Programming on 
the Spectrum version of 
Chase HQ (pictured) is practi- 
cally finished, with plenty of 
people helping out on the 
other versions. Although 



another track game, Ocean's 
ebullient Software Manager, 
Gary Bracey, was quick to 
point out that it's a vast 
improvement over the unsuc- 
cessful WEC Le Mans. 
Whereas WEC was like a 
drive through a ghost town, 
Gary assures us that they'll be 
no let up In Chase HQ, And by 
all accounts he's right, the 
Spectrum version we played 
was great fun, with all the 
characteristics of the arcade 

game- 
Beach Volley isn't the nrst 
sports game to spring to mind 



when thinking of a sports 
simulation. However, due to 
its increasing popularity 
(mainly through Channel 
Four), Ocean have commis- 
sioned their overseas 
affiliate. Ocean France, to 
produce a beach volleyball 
game. With just two players 
on each side of the net, 
there's no time to eye-up the 
local talent (from 12 coun- 
tries). Graphics are great, 
sound contains rock n' roll 
tunes and speech, and some 
hilarious inter-country 

scenes are thrown in for 
good measure Expect Beach 
Volley on all formats in 
shops very soon., (Amiga 
screen.) 





Beach Volley (far left) on the Atari ST. with 
Chase HQ (Spectrum Bcreen) centre and bl 
Retaliator above 



12TGMTX022;9-B9 



LANCASTER 




£19.95 AMIGA, ATARI ST 

t:RL Group PLC, 7D King's Yard, Carpenter Road, London F15 2HD 

For more in format inn rail I 




i rj 



IS THIS THE GAM1 
OFTtf 



■\/i 




TECHNICOLOR 

(c) 1989 Elmtech Research Productions Lid • Screenplay by Robin Candy 
Cameraman Michael Parkinson • Director Roger Kean 



Par sec, n.. a unit of astronomi- 
cal distance equal to the dis- 
tance from earth at which 
stellar parallax would be one 
second of arc; equivalent to 
3.262 tight years, (From PAR- 
ALLAX and SECOND.) Uses: 
Star Wars; Han Solo and the 
Millennium Falcon complete 
the Kessel Run In less than 
12 parsecs. 

TGM first previewed the ParSec 

Graphic Interface way back in 



Issue 7. Since then we've heard 
relatively little from the designers at 
Elmtech Research in Birmingham. 
In Fad the ParSec seemed des- 
tined to join the ranks of great 
machines tnat never were. 
However, the design has been fin- 
ished.. Ihe casing picked, the pro- 
grams perfected arid Elmtech are 
ready to amaze the world all over 
again. 

Elmtech are a four-way partner- 
ship between David Enctll, Martin 
Lockhart, Ian Moore and Mike 



Holding It was formed when Ian 
Moore approached David and 

Martin with an idea for a graphics 
board. David and Martin provided 
the financial backing and Ian 
designed the hardware Software 
design has been handled by free- 
lance programmers spread around 
the country, with the art program 
designed in West Germany. It is 
only recently that the whole team 
has got together in one place ready 
for the final push to launch the 
ParSec 



l4TGMTX022:9-89 



Graphics 



£1.25 










JFTWARE HOUSES »— « 
3M0ONE PIRACY! ATARI MUSIC 

p*t»*fmm*r ■ h i ll i Htrit 



IV 



SX II IS GREAT! ~£ZZ££Z 
THREAT TO .,„, , 

cmuM -^r- || 

r*W«* • rO^LIIMMI PHI! I || 

,f «t MAIL « » ANT A*» «<H t PiAYtMG 



If you previously missed all the 
hoo-ha about the ParSec Graphic 
Interface , here's a quick summary. 

The unit is designed primarily for 
graphics use, being capable of pro- 
ducing very high resolutions with 
many colours. But it isn't just a 
graphics board, rather a computer 
with its own onboard 32-bil proces- 
sor that happens to be extremely 
good at graphics. The present ver- 
sions plug into the ST and use it as 
a host computer. The ST's mouse 
and keyboard are used as input 
devices, information is saved using 
the ST's built-in disk drive and 
sometimes the ST's memory is 
used to provide additional RAM. 
while the ParSec performs all the 
difficult work. II was originally 
planned for the ST merely because 
the ST had the larger market, par- 
ticularly in Germany where the 
majority of STs are used for busi- 
ness applications, However, ver- 
sions are now also planned for the 
Amiga and PC, 

The ParSec was already in pro- 
totype form 12 months ago. So 
what then caused the year-lor>g 
delay 9 David Encill: Essentially it 
was the world shortage of Video 
RAM chips. Prices rose by as 
much as four times. The ParSec 




he Parsec Pixel Plus board, 
hardly larger than a copy of TGM 
(the issue in which we first broke 
the news), will fit inside a case 
making a handy monitor stand. 
Pixel processing Is the name of 
the game {above, in a special 
demo which uses different com- 
mands), and SPEED! The horses 
in the demo (right) speed up fan- 
tastically while a magnifying 
glass (not seen in pause mode) 
floats smoothly over them. 
Below: a Da Vinci PC port-across 
showing block commands and 
the ability of pixel processing to 
switch from positive Id negative 
image. All the pictures are from 
facilities included in the Parsec 
free package- 
uses 24 VRAM chips and we would 
have had to pass this increase 
onto the end user. So we decided 
to delay the release and use the 
lime to fine tune the hardware. As it 
is we've had to increase the price 
only slightly." 

The basic unit, the ParSec 47613, 
costs £918 05 (and nol £458.85 as 
reported in last TGM). This unii 
boasts a resolution of 1024x768, a 
colour palette of 4096 colours, 
756K VRAM and speeds of 6.25 
MIPS. 

Bundled with Ihe hardware is Da 
Vinci, an art package. This includes 
most of the (unctions featured in 
popular art programs: zoom 
modes. block commands, 
adjustable airbrushes, outlined and 
filled geometric shapes. However, 
one completely new feature is a lit- 
tle menu entitled Pixel Processing. 
Although not too sure how it works 
themselves, Elmtech were quick to 
show what it can produce. 
Basically, the program takes two 
numbers, puts them through a 
choice of logic gates (logical oper- 
ate rs are basic binary calcuiators) 
to produce another number (con- 
verted to a colour), Using this 
option you can create many 
colours with one stroke of the paint 



1MS34O10GSP 

Puts Real Horseoou 



In Your Graphics Applications 




TGM TX 022:9-89 15 





All the pictures on 
these pages were 
taken on an Atari ST 
using the lowest 
Par sec resolution 
mode: 640x460 



brush, create weird animation 
effects, and even give the impres 
s ion ol a negative when using a 
black and white pictures, (See pho- 
tographs.) 

Once you've bought your 4768 
you can increase its graphics capa 
bilfttes to phenomenal levels with 
the 8768 expansion board 
(£456.85). The palette is increased 
to a mindblowing 16,777,216 
colours with a maximum of 
196,608 colours onscreen at any 
time — that's an incredible 256 de- 
ferent colours per line! Memory can 
also be increased to 4Mb with 
optional HAM cards. 

The hardware specifications are 
impressive enough but what will 
the ParSec actually be able to do. 
In terms of graphics, just about 
anything you want — and iike its 
name says, FASTI Upgrades are 
planned for the Da Vinci art pack- 
age. But it is the professional paint 
package (due for release sometime 
in October) which should really gel 
the graphic artists slavering The 
programmers have been working 
on the package for a lew years 
now and have just been waiting for 
the right hardware to arrive, The 
program is not only capable of pro- 
ducing the ParSec's 16 million 
colours, but also simulating a vari- 
ety of canvas textures and paint 



techniques, like water colours and 
chalks. This is not a simple pixel 
positioning program. Anyone who 
has painted with watercolours will 
know that the appearance of the 
paint on the canvas is heavily influ- 
enced by the texture ol canvas. 
Similarly with chalks* and the 
amount of pressure used. This 
could well be the first 'true' art pro- 
gram —designed for professional 
artists rather than computer users 
who can draw. The package will be 
modular with additional programs 
available for animation and ray 
tracing. 

Ray tracing is a technique used 
to generate realistic shadows and 
shading. The user specifies the 
light source{s) and the computer 
does the rest for you. Currently 
such packages have been rather 
limited. Some only allow you to 
construct pictures using geometric 
shapes, while others take a long 
lime calculating the ray trace (up to 
half an hour!). The ParSec will be 
able to calculate ray traces as you 
drawl 

Rather (nan develop a wide 
range of software themselves, 
Elmtech have included a GEM driv- 
er with the ST version of the 
ParSec This allows any programs 
which run under a GEM-based 
environment lo work in conjunction 



with the ParSec The benefits are 
obvious. For instance, if you 
already own a good GEM DTP 
package the ParSec will enhance 
its performance with increased res- 
olution, colour palette and speed 
Amiga and PC versions ol the 
ParSec should also be compatible 
with a number of existing applica- 
tions packages 

Genlock and digitiser interfaces 
are planned for the beginning of 
next year. Just a quick look at the 
TGM Guide to Digitisers (Issue 
21/22) shows lhat the Amiga is 
already capable of digitising to high 
standards Imagine a lull-colour 
digitised picture on the ParSec at a 
resolution of 1024*766 —it will be 
almost impossible to tell which is 
the photograph and which is the 
digitised picture. Couple the graph- 
ics capabilities with a genlock inter- 
face and you could be producing 
broadcast quality titles and anima- 
tion at a fraction of the cost, In fact, 
video production companies have 
already shown great interest in 
Elmtech 's new baby. 

The ParSec is clearly aimed al 
the specialist graphics market. The 
cost ot the top-ol-the-range system 
may seem expensive (arid bear in 
mind you need a non-interlaced 
monitor with a minimum resolution 
of 640x480) bul it seriously under 



16 TGM TX022:9-89 



Graphics 




A standard port-across From the PC. the girl in the top left picture hardly 
fills the screen, and so uses even less of the lowest resolution. Above is 
a pixel processing demo showing what can be done with just one brush 
and the right commands! Showing ofl. Robin Candy did the picture 
below: He drew the right-hand half then used pixel process commands 
(highlighted) to convert the colours in the left-hand halt of the face. It 
may not look like much, but it represents staggering paint power 



cuts the £100.000 graphic worksta^ 

lions which perform similar func- 
tions. Anyone involved in any 
aspect of design, from textiles to 
architecture, will find the ParSec an 
;nvaluable, and very cheap, tool. 

Of course the potential for 
games software is enormous. 
Elmtech have already been 
approached by several well-known 



software houses, A Barbarian- 
style game is already in the 
pipeline —now thai could be the 
first computer game that really 
does deserve an 18 certificate! 
Imtech Research Ltd: 
Witherfofd Way. Selly Oak, 
Birmingham 829 4AX. Tel: (021 ) 
472 5719. 
■ TGM LAB REPORT soon.. 




Above: another PC port-across, showing how the block 
command (highlighted) has removed the shuttle's nose, 
and (below) the rotate command has the vehicle blasting 
off sideways on apeculiar heeding for outer space. 




TGM TX 022:9-89 17 




lake ihe heroically 

bronzed HAWKEYf ihmugh I 2 individually ludded level* 

ofniMVstopiornti.it action, IcilurinR real [kir.iM.iv 

H raffing, darling j^P"*" Jnd snund declined to Hive 

your ears I hi' trt'ji of thi'ir lives. 



ATARI ST & AMIGA «. 



^n addictive and beautifully presented shoot 'em up of the highest calibre! gold medai 2ZAP! 64 CBM64/128 

TlnUmift, 1 btuni House. Cileva Part, \ldwm**m, Bwtshir* IC74QW «10? J5W 77 JIM 





(ksMC***' jgZ. 



t&yvrvV)' 



Not "alf! Image Works serves up another ace with this 
conversion of the Sega* 1 coin-op smash. 

Featuring tennis-ational singles or doubles action on clay and 
grass courts from around the world. Passing Shot 7 ' is the most 
accurate simulation of the noble sport to appear since the real 
thing! 

Game, S«t and Match to Image Works! 

"It's rally volley good!" 
Doris Decker 



Available soon on: 

Amiga 

Auri ST 

Commodore 64 (cassette) 

Commodore 64 (disc) 
Amstrad CPC (cassette) 
Amstrad CPC (disc) 
Spectrum (cassette) 
Spectrum (disc) 
MSX {cassette) 

Screen shots from Atari ST 
version 



"I can't fault it!' 
Ivor Lentil 



fI(M 



Image Works, Irwin House, 1 18 Southwark Street, London SEl OSW. 
Tel; 01 -929- 1454- 

PAS5ING SHOT™ HAS BEEN MANUFACTURED UNDER LICENSE FROM 
SEGA- ENTERPRISES LTD, JAPAN, AND "PASS NC, SHOT* 1 AND SKA* 
ARE TRADEMARKS OF SEGA* ENTERPRISES LTD 
• 1 988 SEGA ENTERPRISES LTD, MANUFACTURED BY MIRRORSGFT LTD 






II One Man 




Tall 
buildings, 
crowds of people, 
strange aliens — 
where else could it be but New 
York. TGM's man-on-a-mission, 
and Manhattan resident. 
Marshal M Rosenthal, jumped on 
his pogostick and met the illustrious David Crane 
(author of Little Computer People and Ghostbusters) to 
ask him, among other things, about his latest game A 
Boy and his Blob. 




2QTGMTX022:9-89 



Feature Preview 




J (range things and New York 
seem to go hand in hand. The 
movie Ghostbusters could 
only have taken place in New 
York City, and even 
Ghostbusters it continues this 
fact. New Yorkers EXPECT 
the weird, the uncommon- 
place — and tend to ignore it (You 
might eapect people on 5th Avenue 
In stop and gawk when a mono 
cyclist emerges on his wheel from 
within a revolving door of a busy 
skyscraper — but not here.) 

Considering how strange things 
in general have gotten (when was 
the last time you took a realty 
GOOD look around), its entirely 
appropriate for New York to be the 
setting for David Crane's return to 
producing video games. 

Game designers may be prolifer- 
ating now — with software houses 
producing dozens of games every 
month. However, there was a time 
when the video craze was in its 
infancy — when waiting for one 
game cartridge or disk to appear 
created enormous antrcipation 
(Asteroids was being advertised in 
New York for two months before it 
made its Atari VCS2600 appear- 
ance!}. So it's time for a short video 
history lesson for those who don't 
know or remember. 

Atari started it all in late 1979. 
They did well, after all they had the 
field entirely to themselves — no 
third parties existed. A group of 
game designers left the company to 



'roll their own' as it were, and the 
result was Activision. 

Crane was one of the shining 
lights of Activision back when 
Pong was still considered state-of- 
the-art (he started at Atari before 
going on to be one of Activision 's 
founders). Crane's games included 
Laser Biast Pitfall. Pitfatt 2 (an ani- 
mated television series came out of 
this), Decathlon (the first multi- 
event game can) and Little 
Computer People, among others. 
Others being Ghostbusters, one of 
the most popular and best-setling 
computer games ever (reputedly 
selling over 250,000) — featuring 
that great opening screen with the 
bouncing ball as the theme went 
by. 

Then, the dark forces conspired, 
the planets moved oul of line.., 
well, actually Crane just plain 
decided to get out of the business 
for a bit — this was in 1987 — to 
work on other projects (which he 
still won't talk about). But now he's 
returned, and through Absolute 
Entertainment, he's brought his 
know-how and expertise to bear in 
A Boy and his Biob. 

Before we get Crane to answer a 
few questions, let's take a look al 
A Boy and his Blob (and you ASK 
him very politely since he stands 
something like seven feet tall, and 
with his red beard looks something 
like a Viking warrior who forgot lo 
bring his sword to work that day). 
The packaging tells the story of 



how a young Blob has escaped the 

tyranny perpetuated on all of 
Blobo Ionia by the Great Blob King. 
Arriving on Earth, he befriends a 
young boy. who agrees to help. The 
boy must somehow attain the vital 
component missing from 

Bioboionia — Vita mens. 

Besides this task, they both must 
somehow find a way to reach 
Bioboionia. This requires the two to 
search for a way into Outer Space. 
Which means penetrating the most 
secret levels and layers of New 
York, and Earth. 

Fortunately the Blob can help, 
Bouncing along behind the boy, the 
Blob isn't exactly a fighter. But he 
has the ability to change shape, 
and become a variety of useful 
tools and devices. This doesn't 
happen as a gift however. It's nec- 
essary to supply the Blob with the 
appropriate foodstuff that will cause 
the change. And to know what that 
food will do r and what the Blob will 
change into. 

Fortunately again, the boy has a 
knapsack full of jellybeans, the 
manna of Blobolonians. Tossing 
one down the Blob's throat enacts 
the change, with different flavours 
doing different things. So you see 
lhat there s a lot to do. You must 
fmd jellybeans to perform special 
tasks, discover what those tasks 
are and how to put them into effect 
when Ihe Blob changes. Pius find- 
ing Vitamens to store for later. All 
the while the team are penetrating 



Photographs by 
Marshal M Rosenthal 



"It's entirely 
appropriate 
for New York 
to be the set- 
ting for David 
Crane's return 
to video 
games" 




Digilised pictures of 
New York's skyline 
add atmosphere lo A 
Boy and his Blob. 
while below the sur- 
face, graffiti enlivens 
the subway stations 
(above) — all the 
work of veteran pro- 
grammer Oavid Crane 
{.left}, a Viking warrior 
who forgot lo bring 
his sword to work 
that day'. 



TGM TX 022:9-89 21 



Feature Preview 




Somewhat" reminis- 
cent of an Indiana 
Jones movie poster, 
and the opening bars 
of Blobs music 
sound awfully famil- 
iar... 

Below: fwo more 
Nintendo screens — 
how long will it bo 
before we see the 
conversions? 



Strang e and unknown areas; the 
New York sewers, the underground 
caverns; and somehow find a way 
to leave all this behind and get to 
Blobolonia, All happening In a 
game that combines arcade action. 
adventure and strategy. 

Blobbing along 

Now we turn lo David Crane to find 
out a bit more about the mechanics 

of the game — and maybe a little 
also on how to win. 

'One of the first things to notice," 
begins Crane, is that there are 
digitised pictures of New York 
being used. This helps to create a 
realistic feeling — you're not look- 
ing at artwork; it's really screens of 
the New York skyline. The same 




"Just donl 
give up when 

something 

touch comes 

along..." 



goes lor the graffiti and posters on 
the subway system — it all lends to 
more realism and greater adven- 
ture,' Crane points out that you will 
be running all over the place, arid 
getting into all kinds of trouble. 'But 
that's where your friend the Blob 
comes in; he notes. 'The Blob is 
faithful — he's always behind you. 
waiting to help,' And help he does, 
The blob has the same kind ol big 
warm eyes as a friendly puppy, and 
is just as loyal — following behind 
you no matter where you head, 

The Nintendo joypad gets a 
heavy dose of use here. Crane 



continues: We've learned that 
tossing a jellybean down the Blob's 
mouth does the tnck — but the 
bean doesn't just automatically 
land where you wani it to go, you 
have to be close enough lo do it 
right. There's also times where the 
Blob isn't right behind you, 
because you're somewhere special 
or up in the air. So keep in mind 
that you must learn to control your 
character through a combination of 
the joypad and firing button _ and 
that there are lessons to learn as 
you become more aware of just 
wtiat happens and when.' 

It's also important to keep track 
of the Blob, since he can'l always 
run as fast as you do and some- 
times is a few screens behind 
[screens appear in whole when you 
exit the sides or top]," 

It's important to remember that 
the purpose is fun," notes Crane, 
"Your character can get hurt and 
will have to be replaced by another 
life, but there's only danger to over- 
come — no extreme violence like 
in a karate game." Here Crane 
uses mnemonics for the jelly 
beans. Without giving too mush 
away — a Vanilla bean = Umbrella. 
And part of the fun is watching the 
Blob go through his change — his 
big fat body shrinking info ItseU 
before becoming something unusu- 
al, like a trampoline or ladder. 

This information is echoed on 
the lower screen, while at the top 
another line displays information as 
lo the number of treasures found. 
We hadn't mentioned lhat yet," 
says Crane. 'Treasures are impor- 
tant, although they are difficult to 
find and acquire — I guess 
because they tend to be in remote 
places or guarded by si range 
things. Of course these "things' are 
of Earth, and not half so strange as 
what's going on in Blobolonia.' 

Crane has added other innova- 
tive features to pump up the enjoy- 
ment; one being Point of View. He 
explains: Like in a movie, the pic- 
ture follows the boy around, 
However, when he does something 
which goes into another screen 
(like toss a jellybean off a cliff) , the 
camera will follow this action. It's 
like in a movie where things are 
going on all around — it's not as 
much fun to be limited to one view 
of one character all the time. Point 
of View makes it possible to 'peek' 
into unknown areas without having 
to take a risk.' 

Crane notes that this function 
has been made intelligent — it 
wont happen in the midst of any 
sequence where il could prove 
fatal to lose sight of the boy you're 
controlling. Speaking of scenes. 
there are hundreds of screens in 
the game, plus hidden ones that 
can only be found by investigation 
and perhaps a bit of luck. This is 
one thing that helps lo keep Ihe 
game fresh and replay able once 
you've managed to reach 
Blobolonia and defeat the king — 



though it is much more reasonable 
to use the word IF here. 

'Aboul doing that.' says Crane, 
'that's where the Vitamens come in 
handy. Once you gel to the Blob's 
planet, you'll be using Ihem in a 
special gun to defeat the many 
foes that appear (guess where the 
gun comes from?). Plan to take on 
evil Marsh me I lows, exploding 
Cherry Bombs, mad Popcorn, a 
whole gamut of violent foodstuffs. 
Plus some decidedly unwholesome 
Chomping Sweet Tooth Monsters!' 

Try and try again 

Crane doesn't need to mention 
what is evident onscreen — that 
fast animation was given a priority. 
The Boy even skids when he slops 
abruptly. The Blob, on the other 
hand, has a steady plodding effect 
that is reminiscent ot a bowl of jelly 
being shaken (should the jelly ever 
decide lo jump out of the bowl and 
take off). His eyes blink occasional- 
ly, for a definitely comic look, and 
get a load of how he compacts 
after swallowing a jellybean. The 
screens are bright and colourful 
(except in those areas where rhey 
are purposefully dark and dingy i. 
whip by quickly, aimosi too quickly 
at points where a sate and judi- 
cious look is more appropriate 

Any hints for winning? Just try 
hard; smiles Crane. "There's a lot 
of things to do, and it requires lots 
of Skills; reflexes, quick decisions, 
a fast trigger finger, and plenty of 
thinking — that can be a lot 
tougher than any arcade 
sequence. Just don't give up when 
something tough comes along.' 
Thanks loads, David We were 
were hoping for a secret level 
password, or sequence of actions 
that would turn us invulnerable to 
those blessed Cherry Bombs! 

Crane has designed A Boy and 
his Blob initially for the Nintendo 
system. Asked why, he replies: l va 
designed on many systems, from 
the Atari VCS26O0 to Commodore 
64, to Amiga and ST — each has 
its own characteristics to work wiih. 
This is where we wanted to begin 
our focus — due to ihe high 
demand for game cartridges, and 
the huge number of people using 
the console ' Crane remarks lhat it 
took quite a bit to get the program 
to work the way he wanted on the 
Nintendo system. To accomplish 
what we wanted entailed our creat- 
ing a new programming environ- 
ment from scratch,' he says, 

Crane's designs always exhibri 
ihe sense ot humour and fun that 
should always be a part of any 
video game You may notice that 
the graphic colour of The title is 
somewhat' reminiscent ot an 
Indiana Jones movie poster, and 
the first couple of opening bars' of 
music for Blob sound awfully famil- 
iar. Blob is a two- megabit game, 
and will be available for Christmas. 
So start practising your jellybean 
tossing now. 






22 TGM TX021 ;889 



WATCH YOUR SCREEN - SEPTEMBER 




ocecn 



TM & c: 1964 DC Comics Inc. 



c-c 



ATTENTION 

NEC PC ENGINE ANNOUNCEMENT, 

NEC Corporation, NEC Home Electronics Ltd, and NEC (UK) Ltd (collectively J NEC hereinafter) have 

recently become aware that the PC ENGINE is being offered for sale in the United Kingdom. 
NEC believe that it is important that UK consumers should be aware of the following information. 



The PC ENGINE is a product manufactured by NEC Home 
Electronics Ltd for use with the NTSC transmission system. 
It is not compatible with the UK PAL transmission system 
nor any other non NTSC transmission system, for this 
reason, NEC Corporation does not market the PC ENGINE in 
the UK or in any other EEC countries. 

There are no authorised distributors of the PC ENGINE in 

the United Kingdom at present. 

Therefore, if you are offered a PC ENGINE whkh is said to 

be compatible with the PAL system or any transmission 

system other than NTSC, you should be aware that it will 

have been modified by a third party. 

This modification is made without NEC's permission 

or approval 



NEC (O'porjt.on NEC Hem* Electron^) L!d NEC (UK) Lid 



In the event that a defect should arise in any modified 
PC ENGINE you must contact the dealer from whom you 
purchased the product. NEC cannot be held responsible for 
any defects in any modified PC ENGINE nor be involved in 
any disputes between purchasers and sellers of such 
products, tn particular, NEC (UK) Ltd cannot respond to 
service calls in respect of any modified PC ENGINE. 
Please note that the guarantee provided with each PC 
ENGINE sold in Japan by NEC Home Electronics Ltd extends 
only tn the use of the unmodified PC ENGINE in Japan and 
therefore NEC cannot assist you if you purchase a 
modified PC ENGINE in the UK. Any other guarantee pro- 
vided with a PC ENGINE in the UK is not an NEC guarantee 
Finally, any modified PC ENGINE'S sent to NEC (UK) Ltd for 
servicing will be returned to the sender. 



SEC 




CONFRONTATION: 
COIN-OP 



Mark Caswell checks out four new arcade 
machines and looks ahead to the autumn and 
Christmas licensed coin-op conversions from the 
top software houses 



US CLASSIC 

Think you could beat the likes of 
Lee Travino, Gary Player and 
or Sewy?Time. then, to have a 
bash with US Classic After 
inputting your name, you re 
taken to the tee where a tall 
dark haired chap in golfing clob- 
ber awaits tor your commands. 

The selection of available 
clubs is shown in a window, and 
it helps to have some idea 
which club to choose — as 
golfers know, the length ol the 
hole determines the choice. 
Choose wrongly and you might 
end up in the rough or a bunker 
{or 'sand trap' as Americans 
know them;. 

The game's played with a sin- 
gle ball conlrolier. Whizz this as 
fast as possible in the desired 
direction you want the golfer to 
whack rhe ball, and off il goes 
through (he air with the greatest 
of ease onto (he fairway (or 
bunker...). 



Each time a shot is taken the 
clubs appear and another 
should be selected appropriate 
to your position on the fairway, 

rough or green. US Classic is 
definitely one for the golfing fan 
and ail il lacks is ninteenth hole. 

FIGHTING 
FANTASY 

Once a year the top warriors on 

the planet visit the Hippodrome 
(no not Peter Stringfelbw's 
joint) to battle for fame, glory 

and lotsadosh, You're a tall 
healthy young fella with a strong 
right sword arm, so whay not 
have a go and take a bash at 
the title- 
Alter the very nice title screen 
which explains just what the 
heck is going on, there's a 
choice of three opponents lo 
light: a skeletal creature, a 
lizard and a nasty snake 



woman with a decidedly dan- 
gerous tail. As soon as you've 
picked which one of these 
beauties you reckon you can 
beat, it's into the arena to kick 
hell out of one another. I was a 
little disappointed to find that 
the character movements are 
limited to slashes of the sword 
and jumping — it limits your 
chances of survival because the 
ol her guy often has something 
extra to ensure his. The lizard 
has a shield, the skeleton can 
fly and the snake's tail crushes 
you to death at She slightest 
chance (which produces gush- 
es ol blood from your charac 
ter's mouth.. .nice). 

But when you win a round 
your character raises hs sword 
in the air and a large victory 
message blazes across the 
screen. It's now up to you to 
decide how best to spend your 
hard earned wages, you could 
buy a new weapon (a sword, 
mace or bailie axe), armour or a 
healing potion. Whatever, you 



only have a tew seconds to 
decide which, then it's into the 
ring with the next nasty Overall 
Fighting Fantasy is an average 
bash-em- up marred slightly by 
its lack ol options Worth a lew 
ten pees though. 



CRACKDOWN 

A| the start of the 21 st century a 
group of genetic warriors were 
created, led by an evil alien who 
wanted to destroy the world. 
Earth Delence reckoned on 
thwarting Ibis plan {of course) 
and sent their two (if you play 
with a friend) lop operatives into 
the alien base, there to destroy 
the mega bomb with which" the 
genetic warriors intended carry- 
ing out their liendish plan (cue 
maniac laughter). 

Armed with a laser gun and a 
limited supply ol mega 
grenades (which act a bit like 
smart bombs, blast the hell out 



24TGMTX022:9-89 



I 



1 


1 

ft 

It 
111 




It's beat 10 already know your clubs when you play US Classic 
(far left), whereas avoiding a stubbing is more to the point in 
both Fighting Fantasy (left) and Golden Axe (both above) 



of everything on screen), our 
heroes sneak in. The play area 
is viewed in Gauntiet-Styte 

bird's eye perspective, The aim 
is to charge around each 
screen and locate the red Xs 
painted on the ground, 

When one is located (using 
the overhead map placed at the 
top of the screen), you place a 
time bomb on the spot. Out to 
prevent you are the guards; 
some can only hit you, others 
possess guns. A swift shot in 
the pants is enough to turn the 
toughest soldier to radioactive 
dust, but a well placed shot will 
do the same to you, so beware. 
Scattered around there are 
chests andopening them 
reveals ammo, more powerful 
weapons {the bazooka is a 
dandy) and bonus points. But 
we can't stand here and chat 
cos the bombs" timers are run- 
ning out. Place the last one and 
run like hell for the exit. Some 
good play in this one and 
Crackdown is a fun way to kill a 
couple of hours, 

GOLDEN AXE 

In days of old when Knights 
were bold and heroes had 
names like Gillms 

Tnundemead, Tillius Flayer and 
Axe Warrior, the scene is set for 
this sword W sorcery ramp from 
Sega Golden Axe lets you play 
one of the three toughies in a 
quest to seek truth, justice and 



a chance to run someone 
through with your sword. 
Befleve me, there are plenty of 
chances to do this before the 
game's finished, 

As with Fighting Fantasy 
there is only a jump and fight 
button, but there are a lot more 
combat moves ranging from the 
lethal looking 'web of death' 
decapitation move to literally 
picking up your assailant and 
hurling him bodily across the 
screen. Beware of the occa- 
sional attacker on a mount, 
these are usually fire-spitting 
dragons, or a strange creature 
called a Chicken Legs which 
whips you with its tail, Tables 
can be turned if you gain a 
mount, but if all else fails there 
are always the magic potions — 
if your have collected any..,). 

Each character uses magic 
differently. Giflius can create 
lightning, Tillius makes fireballs 
and Axe can call up an earth- 
quake. Depending on the 
amount of potions possessed 
and the skill level of the user, 
this magic can be useful to dis- 
pose Of a band of attackers. 

Out of the four games 
reviewed here I must say that 
Golden Axe is my favourite, 
partly because of the attention 
lo little graphical details, such 
as the twirling of the sword prior 
to laying into an enemy, and 
partly because I'm a sucker for 
a good sword 'n" sorcery tale, 
Look out for Golden Axe in your 
local arcade ■ 




Arcades 



Coming into Season 

'From the arcades to your home computer!' is the usual pre- 
Christms software house cry. So what s everyone got lined up 
for us this year? 

domark w^^mmmmmmm^mmi^^mm 

Following ^the successful launch of their Tengen licences with 
Vindicators and Xybots, Domark will be releasing APB soon. The 
story of Officer Sob, a copper filling his daily quota of arrests, or fac- 
ing the fiery wrath of his superiors, you are gently eased into the 
game with a tew litter bugs. But soon enough nastier characters 
show (heir faces.. We previewed this last month. 

Naxl on the list. Dragon Spirit lakes you to a mythological age to 
play a hero changed into a blue dragon by divine intervention. He's 
hurrying to save a beautiful princess from an egregious demon. Find 
out in late August if our 
brave hero can save the 
day. 

And round about PC 
show time watch out tor 
Toobin'. This wild and 
whacky game sees |wo 
fun-loving kids setting off 
to a party on a strange 
choice of transport — 
automobile tyres, Hard 
Drivin'. the latest racing 
game to feature stunning 
flight simulator style 
graphics (Domark have 
the arcade version sitting 
in their offices 'purely for 

research purposes' says Mark Strachan, as the swine beats my high 
score), should be out during November, And finally there's Cyberbail. 
a 21st century American Football game featuring very large robots 
instead of humans. The release date is set for early next year. 

OCEAN MHHBMIM^HaB^MHMl^Bi 
Hot on the heels of New Zealand Story (see review on page 64) 
Ocean have Cabal set for release, where one or two butch and well 
'ard mercenary types will be able to vent their violent anti-social ten' 
dencies on a range of enemy soldiers and vehicles. 

And the arcade action 
doesn't stop Ihere: around 
Christmastime you can get 
Chase HO and Operation 
Thunderbolt. Jusl in case 
you've been in outer space for 
the last six months, Chase 
HQ sets you behind the steer- 
ing wheel of a black Porsche. 
Five nasty villains are on the 
loose, your job is to bring 
them to justice. Operation 
Thunderbolt probably needs 
no introduction, the sequel to 
one of 1987's most popular 
coin-ops, the mercenary (this time with a friend) is back. The rescue 
ol spies is the aim. but the usual violent conflicts ensue as the sol- 
diers of fortune yomp around the screen 

ACT1VISION ■■■■■■^■■■i 

Activision have a veritable flood of titles set lor 
release within the next few months. Between 
August and November) Altered Beast, Super 
Wonder Boy and Dynamite Dux should see the 
light of day, The Christmas biggie will be Power 
Drift— nol, perhaps, as violenl as the hydrauli- 
cally powered arcade game. 

And there are loadsa conversions set for 
early 1990. The ones we have into on are 
Galaxy Force (the hydraulic version of This Is 
worse than Power Drift), Fighting Soccer 
(Rambo meets Liverpool Utd perhaps), Hod 
Bod, Sonic Boom and Ninja Spirit. 

Three from Activision. top to bottom: 
Power Drift, Altered Beast antf Hot Rod 





TGM TX 022:9-89 25 




pace, it 

seems, is my 

final frontier. 

'Don't waffle', 
says my editor, 
because you haven't 
the room. And why 
not? With all this sun* 
shine, who wants to 
waste time? So her 
we go, straight in 
with this month's £50 
Star Tip... 




(Nintendo) 

This months Star Tips come 
trom Michael Turner who lives 
in Essex, He's been playing 
Super Mario Bros 2 for some 
time and has sent me the 
complete solution. But that 
might ruin your enjoyment of 
the game, so I'm only publish- 
ing tips for the first two 
worlds this month — more 
next issue... 

World 1-1 

After passing through the first 
door, climb the first beanstalk. 
Once on top of the hill pull the 
piece of grass furthest to the 
right Now throw the potion at 
your feet to ihe left. Go through 
the door and pick up the mush- 
room and (he grass. After exiting 
the subspace. keep going right, 
over the waterfall, till you reach a 
hill with a piece of grass and a 
PQW block on top, Pull the grass 
for an extra lite. Now keep going 
right till you come to another 
door. 

Go through the door and up 
the beanstalk, At the top continue 
right and go through the door. 
Pull the first piece of grass you 
come to. Throw the potion and 
enter subspace. Pick the grass to 



SUPER MARIO BROS 2 



collect coins. Exil subspace. 

Climb beanstalk — in this section 
careful climbing is required, 
Beanstalks vwth monsters can be 
tackled by jumping from below 
onto the monster. If this isn't pos- 
sible, climb above the monsters 
on an adjacent vine then swap 
vines and continue upward, 

When the music changes you 
have reached the section with the 
end-of- level enemy, To kill it jump 
on lop of the Mint Imperials it fires 
at you, pick them up and throw 
them back. Three hits are gener- 
ally required to kilf the thing And 
once dead the monster leaves a 
crystal behind Colled this to 
progress to the next level 

Bonus Chance Screen 

The wheels do not spin randomly. 
It's in fact very easy to stop the 
wheels as required. The secret is 
to watch for a cherry to appear in 
the first wheel and learn how 
often it appears: with this in mind 
the wheel can be stopped on the 
cherry, 

World 1-2 

Climb onto the highest of the 
three hills and watch when Pidgit 
swoops, Just before a swoop, 
jump vertically SQ' that you land on 
Pidgit's head. When you're air- 
borne pick up Pidgit and you have 
control ol a flying carpet. Bui 
move quickly, because the carpel 
doesn't last long Head right, 
throwing Pidgit at any threatening 
enemies. When the carpet starts 
shimmering, position yourself 
over some land till it disappears. 
The first piece of grass contains a 
polion. Enter subspace and get 
the mushroom and as many coins 
as you can. Exit subspace and go 
down into the first jar. Get the 
grass for an extra life. Now exit 
this jar and enter the next one. 

Pick up the key and get out as 
fast as possible to avoid the chas- 
ing Panto, Once out of the jar 
drop the key and wait for the 
Panto to disappear, (hen pick up 
the key again. Run right and open 
the locked door. Always use the 
pick-up key and drop key method 
lo avoid Pantos 

Throw the two enemies down 
holes, pick up the grass nearest 
lo the brick wall. Drop the bomb 
on the bit of the wall that juts out 
and siand back. Now use another 



bomb to destroy the rest of the 
wall. Climb the ladder and pick 
the first piece of grass on ihe left, 
Throw a bomb against the right 
wall so that the floor pieces are 
destroyed. Repeat this twice, 
using the furthest two pieces of 
grass. A potion's hidden under 
Ihe other piece of grass and you 
use this lo enter subspace and 
gel Ihe mushroom. Now go right 
through the door. 

Jump onto the mound and go 
left. Pick up the piece of grass 
and return right with the potion. 
Throw it into the middle of the 
grass and enter subspace for the 
coins, Go right through the door. 
The end-of- level enemy can be 
defeated the same way as the 
previous level. 

World 1-3 

Climb onto the mask and jump 
right onto the hill. Head right. At 
Ihe log pick the second piece of 
grass lo gel the potion. Carry the 
potion to the hill with five blades 
of grass. Use the potion and enter 
subspace for ihe mushroom and 
coins. Head right again. Pick the 
first blade of grass under Ihe log 
for a potion and enter subspace 
for some coins. Continue right 
and go through the door, 

Do a running jump up to the 
rope, then climb up. Take one 
mushroom block and throw it onto 
the platform above. Take another 
and jump up to ihis platform and 
from there onto the block. Do a 
power jump. The mushroom can 
be thrown al the enemy if needed. 

Now jump to the platform on 
the left, then power jump onto the 
middle platform. Continue up to 
the door and go through it. 

Power jump onto Ihe platform. 
get the key and run out of the 
room. Go right and drop down till 
you reach the platform above the 
one where you found the mush- 
room blocks. Proceed along this 
platform and drop down toward 
the right. Throw the key at the 
Shyguy, Wait a moment then pick 
it up again. Head downward. 
Drop through the hole with the 
rope in it, Fall to the right and then 
go through the door. 

Go right and get the crystal, 
Now go through the mask. You 
now meet Ihe end-Of-world 
enemy — Mouser, Use bomb 
found in the grass Id blow the 



wall, then go right lilt you are in 
the section beneath Mouse t He 
throws bombs either to Ihe lar left 
or just left of you, When Ihe area 
to the left is clear of bombs stand 
there and catch the next bomb 
which he throws. Quickly jump 
and throw the bomb at Ihe plat- 
form on which fvtouser's stand- 
ing. Hit him three times.-, and it's 
on to World 2. 

World 2-1 

Head rig hi, watching out tor the 
Cobrats — particularly those 
which jump qui of Ihe jars at you 
You soon come across a hill with 

four blades of grass, the first 
blade on the left contains a 
potion. Enter subspace and col- 
feel the mushroom and coins, 
Continue right, jumping over the 
quicksand, till you reach a door 
Go through it, 

Dig down in the sand using 
button B. It's a better idea to dig 
lots of small tunnels rather than 
one deep one Don't pick up any 
enemies Go down the ladder 
and through the door, When 
a Hacking the end-ol- level enemy 
beware of the holes either side ol 
the platform, Once again three 
hits are required to destroy the 
guardian. 

World 2-2 

Pull the frrsl Wade of grass for a 
potion. Enter subspace and col- 
lect the mushroom and coins. Go 
through the first door you coma 
to. There are lour blades of 
grass, Ihe lowest of which is an 
extra life while Ihe other three are 
all bombs Pick up one and do a 
power jump lo throw it left at (he 
wall. Go left and pull she middle 
blade ol grass. Collect the potion 
and enter subspace for a mush- 
room and coins. Now continue 
right across the desert Go 
through the first door you come 
to. 

Dig down till you come to 
another door. Go through it. You 
now meet the end -of- level 
enemy. Use the usual procedure 
to destroy this one. but beware of 
the fireballs. 

World 2*3 

The first blade of grass contains 

a potion. Keep going right till you 
see a red building with a door 
above you Jump onto a Beezo 



26 TGM TXQ22:9-89 






and then up into (he building, 
Once inside, pick the lirst grass 
on the right and collect the 
potion. Enter subspace and col- 
lect the mushroom and coins. 
Leave subspace. continue right 
and enter the pyramid, 

Drop down to the left, then dig 
down to the door. Go in. get the 
key, go back up to the surface 
and through the locked door. Go 
right, get the crystal and go 
through the mask to meet 
Tryclyde. 

Put two mushroom blocks on 
top of the end column. The mush- 
room btocks prevent any of 
Tryclyde s fire from reaching you. 
Pick up another mushroom block 
and power jump onto the pile of 
lour blocks. Jump out onto the 
platform on the right and throw 
the block at Tryclyde. Don't miss 1 
Repeal this with the remaining 
block. The final hit requires one 
of the mushroom blocks from the 
pHe of four, so take the top block 
and jump onto the right platform 
and Iftrow it at him. You should 
now be transported to World 3-1 




Playing Tips 



VOYAGER 



(Amiga) 

Another routine from the 
Spectral Hacker Follow the 
same procedure as the Blood 
Money POKEs, 

10 REM Wait till game has 
loaded (hen on the options 
screen press 

REM W and then the DEL 
key, you then get the 4th 
option which 
Hem is a cheat 
Joker=459108:Bal=0 ; 
Man =204309 

FOR x=45907B TO 459138 
STEP 2 
READy$:*=VAL("&h-'4yS) 



15 



17 
20 

30 

40 



50 
60 
70 



80 

00 
100 

110 
120 



130 



Bat-Bat+z 

POKEWx,z:NEXTx 

IF Bat=Man THEN GOTO 

80 ELSE PRINT 'Data 

Error" 

Print -Insert VOYAGER 

Disk In DFO" 

Prim "Press Any Key" 

S$=INKEY$: IF S$=" 

THEN 100 

CALL Joker 

DATA 41 FA, 0010, 397C, 

4EF9. 0130. 2949. 0132, 

4EEC 

DATAOOOC, 33FC,4E7t, 

0002, 01 E4, 4EFB. 0800, 

2C7S 
140 DATA 0004. 2Q7C, 00FE r 

88C0. 43 F9. 0007, 0000, 

303 C 
150 DATA 0145. 1208. 51 CB. 

FFFC, 4EF9, 0007, 001 A 



CHUBBY GRISTLE 

(Atari ST) 

David Whittle, Bury 

When the title screen appears 

type BUUURRP for Infinite 

lives. 




BLADE EAGLE 3-D 

(Sega) 

Christopher Yardley. Glasgow. 
To choose the level that you 
start or move the joypad in a 
clockwise direction when on 





(Atari ST) 

Harjit Singh from Dalton has 

sent in these codes for both 

orve- and two-player games, 

1 -Player 

Level 9 - RAD AG AST 

Level19 YARIWAK 

Level 39 - ORCSLAYER 



Level 59 SKYFIRE 

Level 75 MIRGIAL 

2 Player 

Level - GHANIMA 

Level 19 GILIEP 

Level 39 MOURNBLADE 

Level 59 J AD AW IN 

Level 75 GUMBACHACHMA 



BLOOD MONEY 

(Amiga) 

No sooner had the ptea gone out for more Amiga POKEs 
than what should arrive In the office but two routines from a 
hacker calling himself the Spectral Joker of Gotham City Type 
the program into your Amiga (save it to disk tor future use J, 
run it and then Insert the Blood Money disk. Unfortunately. I 
haven't had a chance to test out the Amiga POKEs because 
our photography department seems to use our Amiga more 
than we do.,. 

10 HEM infinite lives for both players 

20 Plus=5G1 925: Three=0; Spec=626 30 FOR x=518 TO 667 

STEP 2 

40 READ y%: 2=VAL("ah'Vy) 

50 Plus=Plus-z 

60POKEWx,z;Next K 

70 IF Plus=Three THEN GOTO 8D ELSE PRINT "Data Error": 

END 

80 PRINT Insert BLOOD MONEY Disk in DFO" 

90 PRINT "Press Any Key" 

100 J$=1NKEY$:IFJ$="" THEN 100 

110 CALL Spec 

120 DATA 23FC, 0000. 0214, 0003. 0038. 4EEC. 0GOC, 23FC 

130 DATA 0000, 0224, 0007. DC4E, 4EF9, 0007, DBB8. 23 FC 

140 DATA 0000. 0234. 0007. C40A. 4EF9. 0007, A120, 21 FC 

150 DATA 4E71 , 4E71 , 3E2A, 31 FC, 4E75, 4402, 31 FC, 4E71 

160 DATA 2C16, 31 FC, 4E71 . 31 72, 21 FC. 4EB8, 0268, 067E 

170 DATA 21 FC, 4752, 4946. 7E3E, 31 FC, 4F20, 7E42, 4EF8 

180 DATA Q40O, 0879. 0001 , 00BF. E001. 4E75, 2C78. 0004 

190 DATA 2E3C, 0003. 0000. 20 7C. 00FE, 88C0. 43 F8. 00C0 

200 DATA 303C, 0145, I2DS. 51 C8, FFFC, 21 FC, 2007. 4E71 

210 DATA OI02. 4EFB. 0ODE 



LORDS OF THE RISING SUN 

(Amiga) 

Andrew McGarrigle from Mexborough sent me these tips on 

how to achieve Shogun on the easier levels of the game. 

If you're a beginner select Yoshitsune — this allows you to 
practise your strategies. To begin with concentrate all your ener- 
gies on the eastern castles. These tend \o fall very easily at the 
start of a game. Next try recruiting as many men as you can, 
especially from the White Ronin. If your army is at lull strength he 
may decide to join you. Should he 
wish to pass unhindered let him — 
he doesn't pose a threat to your 
armies Dr lands early on in the 
game. 

As you've been taking castles in 
eastern Japan your brother, 
Yorimto, has been causing havoc 
in and around central Japan, Rest 
at one of your castles for a while. 
Then go and fight your brother — 
with a little luck he should be killed 
in the battle. You then inherit your 
dead brother's lands and armies, If 
you don't succeed in killing him. 
persevere till he's dead. You can 
now start to conquer the rest of 
Japan. 

Once you have taken the main- 
land make a couple ol visits to the 
Emperor at KoyotO- He should give the sacred scroll and on fol 
low up visits the sacred sword. Around this time keep a watchful 
eye on the encounter screen. Your enemies will be growing 
increasingly nervous as your power increases and will send nin- 
jas to kill you. As soon as you as you see a message about a 
ninjs press the left mouse button, and with a bit ol luck the offend- 
ing general will commit seppuku. 

Your next task is to take the remaining two islands and the last 
four castles. Send one of your generals to Nagoya, one to Arkawa 
and one to Matsue. This prevents your enemies from resupplying 
when they retreat to trie mainland. When you take the final castle 
you will become Shogun. 
General Tips 

Always check your siege skills before attacking a castle. If neces 
sary swap skills with anoiher of your generals. The same applies 
to sword skills (for skirmishes on land) and bow skills { when 
defending castles) 




T 1 



TGM TX 022:9-89 27 



Playing Tips 



WORLD GAMES 

(Amstrad CPC) 

Derek Milton. Buckpool 

1 ) Load Barrel Jumping 

2) Set number of barrels to 20. 

3) Keep fire button pressed 
while moving the skater's (egs. 

4) When the black flag appears 
at the edge of the screen, the 
skater automaticaly jumps 

5) Keep the fire button pressed 
while the skater jumps over the 

flag. 

6) Pull the joystick down when 
trie skater begins to fall (keep 
the fire button pressed the 
entire timej. 

7) The Skater lands in front of 
the barrels. You can take your 
finger off the fire button now, 



DUNGEON 
MASTER 

(Atari ST) 

Mark Lawrence. Basildon.. 
Before using this cheat make 
a backup of the file START. 
PRG on the Dungeon Master 
disk in case you want to play 
the game without the cheat- 
insert the Dungeon Master 
disk into the drive; RUN the 
program, Once the game has 
loaded you should have infi- 
nite health and strength. 

10 REM '"""Cheat Routine for 

Dungeon Master""" 
20 OPTION BASE 1 : DIM 

A(512):CHEAT = 

VARPTR(A(1)) 
30 DEF SEG=0: REM remove if 

new ST Basic is in use 
40 BLOAD "A:STAflT>PRG". 

CHEAT 
50 FOR N=t TO 5: READ B: 

POKE CHEAT+B, &H4E71 : 

POKE CHEAT+B+2, 

&H4E41 : NEXT N 
60 FOR N=&H26Q TO &H2GE 

STEP 2: READ B: POKE 

CHEAT+N,B: NEXT N 
70 BSAVE "A:5TART 

PRG",CHEAT,770 
80 DATA SH93CG, SHQQDe, 

&H00FC, &H0118. &H0154. 

&H93C0 
90 DATA 8.H337C, 5H4E71 . 

4H4338, &H337C, SHB06B, 

SH4SD9, &H4E92 




LEISURE SUIT LARRY 2 



By popular demand here are 
some more tips for the sec- 
ond Leisure Suit Larry game, 
this time from James 
Norwood of Gloucester. 

Boat Scene 

1 ) Enter ruoom 1 and get Fruit, 

2) Go behind the dresser and 
lake your clothes oft. 

3) Leave room, go to room 2. 
Get in (he pool and swim. Then 



dive and swim to the bottom 
Gel to the top. ihen gel out ol 
the pool, 

4) Put some sun screen on 
and, then lie down on the 
sunbed. 

5) Get up and exit the pool 
area 

6) Go back to room 1 and put 
your clothes back on. Leave 
room 

7) Enter room 6. get the dip 



and eat it. Leave room, 
B} Enter room 3 and sit down 
After the sequence has fin- 
ished leave the room 

9) Enier room 4. Walk to the 
lever on the right of the cap- 
tain. Pull the lever and leave 
the room. 

10) Go to place 5 and get in 
one of the life boats 11 ) Put 
some sunscreen on, and then 
use wig. 





RESTAURANT 



Resort Map 

1 ) Enter scene 4 and get the 
flower. 

2) Talk to the man in the 
restaurant and then sit down 
Wait. 

3) Go over to the food display 
and stand next io the table on 
the west Get the knife and 
leave the room. 

4) In the jungle type TAKF 



SHORTCUT' or TAKE 
CLOTHES OFF ". 

5) Once In the room go over to 

the bed and get the matches. 
Then go to the bathroom and 
get the soap. Should the maid 
come in type "F... LADY' but 
you must save the game at this 
point because in the end you 
will be shot. 

6) Leave the room Go to the 



SUPER MAR! STEREO BEAST 






DrfvO 

(Nintendo) 

Stephen Royle. Saiford 
To get a continue game 
option hold down the A' 
button while pressing start 
when the title screen 
appears. 



(Sega) 

Glenn Jackson, Horn church. 

On the title screen press the 



barbers and sit down. 

7) Leave room. Go back to 
scene 1 and type GET BOT- 
TOMS 

8) Enter scene 4, leave the 
restaurant. Enter room 6; go to 
the far wall around the corner 
and take your clothes off. Then 
put the soap in top and leave 
the room. 

9) Go to room 7 and sit down 
When the sequence has fin 
ished leave the room 

1 0) Go to scene 3. walk to the 
righl and you shouldn't be 
recognised by the KG8 agents. 



top left direction button along 
with both tire buttons When 
you start the game you arise 
from your grave with five 
energy bars. 




WORTH Or SOFTWARE MUST BE WON! 

nonth the besl set ol tips. POKEs or maps 
earns the sender an incredible 50 worth of soft- 
ware of their own choice along with a TGM 
shirt. Send all your gaming information Io: 
Robin Candy's Playing tips. TGM, PO Box 10, 
Ludlow, Shropshire SYS 1DB 



28 TGM TX02 1:8-89 



CAPTAIN 



DARK PESTROYER, WE F/ENP 
WITH A £GVER£ PERSONALITY 
PROBLEM IS TRyihlG TOPESTROX 
ALL We GAMES SOFTWARE 



DESTROYER 



WWANNA PLAY 
GAMES SUCKERS? 
HAW/HAWfmW/ 

NO MORE FUN 
MEAWEAPS' 



^ 



m 



*.. 



* y 



WM 



fa 



tfOLP IT 
RfSHT WERE 
SCREWBALL f 



AJ 






" captain craur 

L YOU BRAIN LESS WtMPf 



SO IT WAS A &T 

BEWW7WEBELZ 
WHO CARESP ONLY 
TROUBLE fS, HE'S 
PESTROYEPALL 
WE 6 AMES 
SOFTWARE 



r 



fc 



Jb 



\ 



MEY f WATT A SECONP 

THERE MiGNT 00 ONE 
&UMMER OF MOPE. . . 



/I 



.* 



01 



y^i\ 



Pa*l To. The flr>itHial Carruulef Shaw, 
Tiek*1 Office, 11 ManrhMtar Stjua'P 
k London W1.M SAB 
, Plw?5» Wndm«Tirhcli|I«(!i|10'hliP*T*riO' 

i \ Compuls* Sbo* 

\ Ng of Tictd? 



MdkMt 



I- \ ^ 



I ENCLOSE A CHEQUE/POSTAL OSDES 
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AITO'S ARCADE HIT *0CDNCES 
ONTO YOUR MICRO SCREEN WITH 
A BURST OF ZANY ACTION. 

Wally Walrus has captured his tea - 30 of Joey Kiwi's friends from ttie New 
Zealand too, and if Joey doesn't rescue them all by tea-time they'll be stuffed, 

served and swallowed at Wally's taWe-. Joey has to search Wally's domain which <s 

just h 0W yOU WO u!d expert i I to be - FAT with danger' 

Armed only with a bow and arrow. Joey can accumulate more weapons, 
along the way, Beware of the malicious rabbrts, boomerang throwers-, 

deadly frogs, blood-sucking bats, and many, many more villainous 
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\an Software Limited ■ 6 Central Street • Manchester ■ M2 SMS 
>*: 061 832 6613 Telex : 669977 OC EA MS C ■ Fax: 061 8 3 4 065O 



\ 



1 



a 




Colour or Line Artwork: 



As long as you have a mono 
video camera, or a Super VHS 
camcorder, with a reasonable 
copy stand, you won't 
encounter any problems in 
achieving reasonable results. 
The main two things to watch 
out lor is picture distortion and 
lighting. Most digitising cameras 
are supplied with a wide angle 
lens which creates an unrea- 
sonable amount of distortion. If 
you're into photography (owning 
an Instamatic will do), you'll 
know that the smaller the view- 
ing angle, the smaller the image 
distortion win be. An ultra wide 
angle lens such as a fish eye 
displays a completely circular 
distorted image, while a tele 



From the glamour and glitz of last month's digitised pics to 

cars and other sexy things. Whatever subject you choose to 

immortalise with your DIGIVIEW, you will have to cope with a 

number of different picture carriers, important is to make 

your Digiview setup swallow any possible format there is. 

Here's a range of alternative sources: 



lens displays a near-perfect 
geometry thanks to its near-par- 
allel lens angle 

So why the choice of a wide 
angle lens on the digitising cam- 
era? 

Well, you'll normally want to 
digitise artwork up to and over 
A4 size, which means you hav- 
ing to scan a picture height or 
length of 3QCmm at feast. If you 
were to have a lens with a big 
focal length (ie a small lens 
angle) your copy stand would 



have to cope with an enormous 
cam era -to -artwork distance. 
The ang!e on your standard 
lens is approximately 45 
degrees, which gives you a 
camera-to-artwork distance 
equal to the artwork length, ie 
approximately 300nnm for an A4 
size. If you don't want to put up 
with an image border looking 
like an old Fifties-style telly, you 
have lo dump the standard lens 
(usually 8.5mm focal aperture) 
and go lor a big focal length 



A famous olde 
town featuring the 
brightest brains in 
computer maga- 
zine publishing. 
Yes. you guessed 
right... we hope. 

Digitised from a 
35mm neg with an 
18. 5 mm video 
lens, the original 
wide angle shot 
gets an extra warp 
treatment, Colours 
corrected and 
heavily DIGIVIEW 
sharpened to cre- 
ate sepia and 
grain effect (if 
nothing went 
wrong with the 
printing prcocess 



TGM02 



ALSO IN THIS ISSUE OF CENTRE BYTES... 

EMULATING 

New state-of-the-art hardware makes state-of-the-art software 

possible for Amigas and Atari STs. We look into emulating IBM 
ATs and XTs and Macintoshes on the popular 1 6 -bit machines. 
Plus a TGM Lab Report on A -Max, a hardware add-on which lets 
Amiga users run highly sophisticated Mac publishing programs 
• Page 37 



EMULATION ST/Amiga to IBM Mac.,.....,,., page 37 

INFORMATION DESK - page 43 

INDEPENDENT REPAIR SERVICES ....„„„„, page 44 

TOOLBOX — those useful new bits and pieces page 46 

CLASSIFIED ADS , ..„.,page50 

READERPAGE....... page 52 

a^BlT HARDWARE GUIDE page 57 

MEL'S TRIVIA QUIZ RESULTS..... page 61 



TGM TX 021:8-89 31 




lens of, say, f=25mm or 
1=50 mm, 

Swing the camera on the 
copy holder to a horizontal posi- 
tion and fix !he artwork to the 
wall at a distance of 1 to 2 
metres. Video camera manufac- 
turers such as Panasonic won't 
supply special lenses. II you 
own the very popular Panasonic 
WV 1410 camera. 

find a good video equipment 
shop which can provide you 
with the necessary 2/3-" C- 
mount lens with manual iris. 
Expect to pay anything between 
£40 to £100 for the lens (old 
rule; the bigger the focal length, 
the bigger the price!}. 

Fiat luce l Please let there be 
light! Nothing more true in digi- 
tising than that, Only problem is 
colour digitizers are quite finicky 
about the colour temperature of 
the light, ie whether you use 
normal, colour corrected, halo- 
gen or fluorescent light sources. 
To avoid wasting hours of your 
time and great reamfuls of 
pound notes, try using miniature 
fluorescent tubes or pinch the 



miniature halogen lights which 
illuminate your chic art collec- 
tion. Seriously, your video 
equipment store can provide 
you with special video lights, 
although they may want to sell 
you ©ilher portable battery oper- 
ated camcorder lights (expen- 
sive!) or l.OOOW-plus flood- 
lights, Other than that, go to 
your Do- It- Yourself store and 
buy the shod fluorescenl tubes 
used in bathrooms and 
kitchens They're not colour cor- 
rected, but you can compensate 
the bluey tinge with the 
DIGIVIEW colour control slides. 
When setting up the lights, 
make sure you avoid horspots. 
Use four bulbs or two tubes lo 
ensure even lighting across the 
artwork and set them at a large 
enough reflection angle lo avoid 
shiny patches on the artwork 
(not easy to overcome!) 

SLIDES AND NEGS 

These are probably the easiest 
media lo use There's an abun- 
dance of slide copiers available 
on the market, but very few that 



L 



DIGIVIEW GOLD (Newtek) RRP £1 49.95 

DIGIDROID (Newtek) RRP £69-95 

PANASONIC WV1500 VIDEO CAMERA w/o fens RRP £19980 

HITACHI HV720 VIDEO CAMERA w/O lens RHP £208.00 

8mm VIDEO LENS with manual iris RRP £45.66 

16mm VIDEO LENS with manual Iris RRP £37.20 

COPY STAND RRP £59.95 

XEROX 4020 INK JET PRINTER RRP £1 437.50 

XEROX CUT SHEET FEEDER HHP £253.00 

XEROX 4020 STARTER PACK (roll holder and complete set of 

consumables) RRP £146.68 

XEROX CUT SHEET PAPER (500 sheets) RRP £28.97 

XEROX 50m x 210mm PAPER ROLL RRP £19,98 

XEROX O.H TRANSPARENCY PACK RRP £5571 

XEROX MAINTENANCE CARTRIDGE RRP £1 8.33 

XEROX INK RAINBOW PACK RRP £16,33 

XEROX BLACK INK RRP £9, 1 7 

XEROX CYAN INK RRP £9 17 

XEROX MAGENTA INK RRP E9.17 

XEROX YELLOW INK RRP £9.1 7 

DELUXE PAINT 3 (Electronic Arts) RRP £79.99 

DELUXE PHOTOLAB (Electronic Arts) RRP £69.99 

Available from any specialist computerstore or {in despair) direct 
from TGW SHOPPING. 



QUADRAFLIGHT! 

Not for sale this one- 
off sports car on 
Triumph basis. 
Digitised from a 
35mm slide with high 
contrast and sharp- 
ness settings. 



provide adequate performance, 
Avoid systems which require 
the slide or neg to be back-pro- 
jected from a normal slide pro- 
jector onto a halfmirror, onto 
which your video camera focus- 
es, as they are very difficult to 
set up and you usually end up 
with a centreweighted illumina- 
tion pattern. Better are the tube- 
shaped slide holders (which 
screw onto the camera lens. 
They require you to organise 
your own lighting, but if you 
have a slide projector, you have 
a halogen light source, which 
you can point directly onto the 
diffoser which is normally locat- 
ed at the free extremity of the 
slide holder. The problem with 
these units is that they don't 
provide for the existence of a 
mechanical colour filter wheel in 
front of the lens and you there- 
tore loose the colour option 
(camcorders usually don't fea- 
ture such eccentricities'). 

A further drawback is that 
[hey don't provide enough con- 
trol over the picture format, ie 
size/scale and subject centring. 
If it's versatility you're looking 
for. construct your own slide - 
copying system by ransacking 
your old photo kit. If you can 
obtain a piece of milky -white dif- 
fuser glass for plastic) you're in 
business. A bit of clever card- 
board engineering generates a 
slide holder with the diffuser 
glued in place between light 
source and slide. Ideally you 
should obtain a macro bellows 
guide or any solid holding 
device, which can be positioned 
on the copystand above the II u- 
orescent/halogen light source to 
position the slide or neg hori- 
zontally at a correct distance to 
the lens. By cranking the video 
camera up or down the copy 
holder column you can adjust 
the picture ratio on the monitor. 
Don't forget to leave a gap 
between the lens and your 
copyholder for Ihe colour lilter to 
do its rotation cycle. 

The deliberations on the focal 




length of the lens apply here as 
well, but the difference is thai 
the original size is only 
35x24mm (assuming you limit 
yourself to the popular 35mm 
format), which means that using 
an f25mm lens not only pro- 
vides you with an undistorted 
image, but also gives you a 
generous 120mm distance to 
the lens — enough leeway to 
close in on an interesting sub- 
ject and magnify part of the pic- 
ture. To this purpose the whole 
unit can be freely moved over 
the copystand for besi picture 
composition, 

VIDEO SOURCE 

A large range of applications fall 
under this heading and possible 
video sources are TV, video 
recorders, camcorders and 

computers, The major draw- 
back of DIGIVIEW is that it can't 
cope with colour modulated 
video signals without extra 
hardware. Although the first 
Amiga-based colour mage 
grabbers are at long last coming 
onto the market, I here will be a 
large number of DIGIVIEW 
users who baulk at spending in 
excess of £500 for these new 
devices, They may however 
consider upgrading their 
DIGIVIEW system so it can 
handle colour video sources. 
This is going to be the subject 
of next month's article. 



Right: PhotoLab blowing 
sultry Kim Basinger out oJ 
all proportion! This large 
picture is only one quarter 
of the digitised image, 
which can be seen, small- 
er, at (he top of the page 




32TGMTX022:9-89 



Centre Bytes 




TGM TX 022:9-89 33 



Centre Bytes 




Left: a detail of thegumt-sized PhotoLab poster of Michelle 
Pleilfer (see last month s article!). Thanks to anti-aliasing, pic- 
lure detail exceeds digitised resolution. Above: screen shot of 
the digitised Ludlow street used in the printed title picture 



XEROX 4020 INK JET 
COLOUR PRINT- 
ING 

Setting up the printer is a dod- 
dle if you follow the instructions 
provided in the manual and 
there's no point going into the 
nitty gritty. Make sure you have 
the Workbench 1.3 printer 
drivers, as there's a major 
improvement in speed and print 
variable options over version 
1 .2 drivers. Have a wet cleaning 
cloth to hand for the first print- 
out — when you do an A4 size 
print the paper has to be cor- 
rectly positioned on the printer 
platen, which can only be done 
by trial and error, leading to 
part of the picture printing 
directly on the platen. Insert the 
paper about an inch to the right 
of the casing edge and you 
might not have to clean up the 
mess. 

The print preferences allow 
you to set all the necessary 
parameters including left offset 
and density etc Operate with 




density 1 or 2 depending on 
whether you can afford the 

extra ink pumped onto the 
paper with setting 2. The sub- 
windows GRAPHIC 1 and 2 
allow you to mess about with 
scaling, dithering and smooth- 
ing controls etc Color Correct 
RGB reduces the amount of 
possible shades achieved by 
dithering, but provides better 
rendition of the screen colour, 
The results obtained are simply 
excellent and can only be beat- 
en by much more expensive 
thermal transfer colour printers, 

ALL ABOUT YOUR 
VECTOR ACCOUNT 

For those fortunate enough to 
be able to consider purchasing 
the XEROX 4020 colour ink jet 
printer (HRP of £1,437.50!). 
here's a rundown of the 
machine's running expenses 
and other quirks — assuming, 
of course, that it's mostly used 
for colour graphics work, It's 
highly unlikely that anyone 
would purchase it tor text appli- 
cations only 1 

The consumables costs split 
into paper, ink and maintenance 
fluid. By tar the most expensive 
of these items is the ink. 
Although this printer allows you 
to top up each of the four 
colours (cyan, magenta, yellow 
and black) separately, unlike 
some other ink jets (HP PAINT- 
JET), you'll quickly find your 
graphics printing being regularly 
interrupted for topup requests 
for one colour at a time. At least 
you're not forced to throw away 
a multi-coloured cartridge with 
plenty of ink still left in it. 

Top On the popularity list is 
the black ink. as most shades 
are heavily mixed with it to give 
a good dense appearance to 
the printed image — about a 



4:1 ratio, ie by the time you're 
asked to topup cyan, magenta 
or yellow, you will have proba- 
bly done four fillups of black. 
The ink supply comes either as 
a RAIN80W PACK of 5cc car- 
tridges for the four colours, or 
you can acquire single-colour 
packs of 2 x See cartridges- 
Assuming full colour A4 prints. 
expect to get between 15 and 
20 copies with one black car- 
tridge and between 50 and 80 
for the other colours — a cost of 
about 4Qp for each A4 copy. 

The consumption ol the 
maintenance fluid is more diffi 
cult to predict, as it depends on 
the amount of times you switch 
the printer on and off between 
printouts. The XEROX 4020 
performs a lengthy wash rou- 
tine on startup and shutdown. 
or on command by pressing the 
recover switch at the back of 
the printer when clogging 
occurs, and this is the only time 
it uses maintenance fluid. Add 
another 5p per copy to be on 
the safe side. 

This leaves the paper cost, 
which varies depending on the 
paper format you use. Best 
cost performance is achieved 
with single- sheet A4 paper at 
5.8p per sheet. Roll paper 
works out at an amazing 12p, 
assuming a Cut waste of only 
3mm, It would appear that 
XEROX has structured the 
paper cost in favour of cut 
sheets, so that you will be 
inclined to purchase their cut 
sheet feeder accessory, partic- 
ularly as it's liddly to load cut 
sheet paper into the printer. So 
the total cost of a page adds up 
to 50. Sp per Sheet and don't for- 
get the meter is running even if 
you don't gel the hardcopy right 
first time. On the plus side, think 
what it would cost you to have 
an A4 photographic print made I 



APPLICATION SOFT- 
WARE 

The Amiga is probably the only 
machine to include colour print 
drivers in its basic configuration 
All application software makes 
use of the standard drivers and 
compatibility is thus ensured. 
There's no particular piece of 
software to recommend for the 
hard copy output, the obvious 
choice is DlGlVIEW itsell. as 
you can alter your digitised 
image while it's still in 21 -bit 
RGB form in memory and make 
the necessary corrections on 
brightness, contrast, saturation. 
colour balancing and sharpness 
to adjust tor a perfect printout 
Always remember to optimise 
for a perfect printout, even if the 
screen representation may look 
Impaired! 

DlGlVIEW is also foe only 
graphics software to provide a 
full display of a high resolution 
interlaced screen. DPaint 1.2 
and 3 will not allow this and con- 
vert on loadup to medium reso- 
lution display , which has to be 
scrolled around approximated 
under a special menu com- 
mand. On the plus side DPaini 
has an excellent palette control, 
and il there's any retouching to 
be done. Dpami's the one, 

Favourite choice must be 
Deluxe Photolab with its incredi- 
ble poster program allowing you 
to print massive posters by split- 
ting the image info pages or 
strips, which can then be tiled 
and assembled, on a carrier. 
What makes this program a def 
inite hit is its excellent anti-alias- 
ing feature, which removes- the 
'j aggies' and creates I he impres- 
sion of a higher resolution than 
actually exists, important il you 
consider a resolution of 640 x 
512 spread over metres of 
poster' 



34 TGMTX02 1:8-89 



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Top Quality 2nd Drives for the Amiga 
and Atari ST at lowjow prices 




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• External plug In PSU (Atari ST) 

• Throughpert (Amiga) 

• Very quiet 

• Slimline design 

• Colour matched to computer 

• Long cable for location 
either side of computer 

• Full 12 months guarantee 



Don't forget^ prices shown 
include VAT and delivery 



ATARI ST VERSION ONLY 





AMIGA VERSION ONLY 





including VAT and delivery 




A ATARI* Hardware Offers 



520 STFM POWER PACK 



Amazing vaijB, all-raw special ST package 1nom Atari I Iftduoes 5205TFM witti 1MEQ driva, 

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Of Chlrt-topptng software worTh Over £500 1 Software included l»: 

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Mwturner SUqfAr Bd*w*i Smgnosa /Vf 

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on/y Inc VAT A delivery 



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Fantastic value package, comprising of a 520STFM with 1Mb 
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many extra software titles worth over £620 In total I 
ATARI HAVE SUPPUED THE FQU-QWING SOFTWARE TTHES : 



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520STFM with bu>li-in TV mofluEetpr arvd 1 Mb Internal drive £26900 

550 STFM 1MEG internal drive upgrade kit with full instructions ,,.., £74,95 

520 STFM 1MEG rnftnwy uprndeTuL requires soldering ESS. 00 

52D STFM 1MEG memory upgrade- fitted by <jb , £119.00 

1 040 STFM with buHHn TV modulator. 1Mb drive, 1Mb RAM £389. OO 

10*0 STFM "Super Pack' including 21 games and! joystick 

plus 'Organiser' busirwss software for only ..... £410,00 

1040 STFM Hyper Peek, including Hyper Paint, Hyper Draw. 

'Organiser S £50 software vflucner redeemable with Atari £429.00 

'Supar pack software' 21 Games etc.. a* supplied by Atari £60 OO 

MegaSTl wilh mono rhDhitof .... .... ,~. £599.00 

5M124 high resolution monochrome monitor .... , £119.00 

SC12Z4 Dolour monitor ....... , , £27fl.QO 

Megafile 3QMb hard disk, new low price .... . £43900 

Vertex HDpJu*40Mb hard diak ..,....,..,.-, £519-00 

5.25" External 40VBO track drive OWV720K) tBM compatible , £99.00 

Vidi-ST 16-tonfl video frame grabber Inc. dlgiusing software £95.00 

Philips CM8B33 colour monitor with ST cable - £229.00 

Philips SCMB52 as above, higher resolution ........ £253.00 

fTT CP322S 16-5* remote Ctrl TV/Monitor, with ST coble £229.00 

Py* 1185 IS - FST TV/Monitor wilh Teletext., rem/Ctrl a cable £269.00 

Kempaton Mouse, h.gh resolution A oood_guaiij^epjaoe^nen^ ;ll Jga : 9S_ 



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TV/MONITOR 

(MODEL 11851 



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VALUE I 

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Inclyde* VAT 

md computw 

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AMtGA ACCESSORIES 



A501 RAM,' Clock expansion unit lor the Amiga M0 £119.00 

External 5.25" 4GVB0 track swhlchabia floppy drive £1 14,95 

Vortex 'System 2000' 40Mb hard disk, wilh interface a software ..,„,.. £529,00 

ITT CF3228 16-5 ' TV/Monitor wl|h lull ram/ctri a SCAflT c«bj« ,. £229,00 

Philips CMeS33 COtaur monitor. c/W Amiga cable .„ £229.00 

Philips BCM852 colour monitor as above, higher resolution £259 00 

Amiga 500 dusl cover .„ , „ „ „ £4.95 



All prices Include VAT delivery & cable 





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Colour version elao avelleble. 

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Pricee Include 2 extra 
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How to order from 

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Saou d«* etCBabA wtjco*n;r pgeubk 

All goods subject In inilibilitt, UtO.K 

Open le nllen e dajf, 9 JB-5 JO 



Evesham Micros Ltd 

63 BRIDGE STREET 

EVESHAM 
WORCS WR11 4SF 

© 0386-765500 

fax 03BS- 785354 
te«e* 333294 



Mt» m: 17« hntm H4, Coiirridcc. Binwi|;han. n w JDil Td; Kl 451 4S44 



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A. PB 6 99 6.99 6.99 10.50 

ftcbon Frahter 6 99 6.99 6,99 10-S0 

Afterburralf 7.25 7 25 5 9 10.50 

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Am*Ttean ks H«*,eyN,'A 6.99 N'A N/A 

Archipeiigos N-'A l*A N/A N/A 

Balance of flower 1990N 'ANA NA N.'A 

Barbarian II 4.99 4.99 5 99 tOSO 

Batman II 5 50 £.50 6.50 1150 

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BlasiewoifJs 6.50 6, 50 6.50 10.50 

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Chicago 30 s 6.99 7.50 7.50 11.25 

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12,89 


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ACtrUnStmca 


5 99 


Altariala FUaoty 


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■M»"LV]e'L.:.r 


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CyDemrjtd II 

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5 90 7 35 7 25 10.50 13 99 13.99 



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Machine 6.50 6.50 6,50 12 SO n» 11-99 

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> Only f 99 



rfr 



The Amiga at 
the front of this 
picture is run- 
ning a high-end 
Macintosh DTP 
application 
with almost 
effortless ease 
— it's all 
part of 
the latest 
computing 
rage — 
time to... 








Emulation means to 'become like* — to do exact- 
ly as the other computer does in all things. As 
Paul Daniels might say: 'Computer, become an 
IBM... now turn into an Apple Macintosh/ Now 
you too can say Hey Presto! and turn your ST or 
Amiga into any IBM. Mac, or piece of furniture 
you like. Marshal M Rosenthal grabs a magic 
wand and announces his own Emmys from 
America, and Franco Frey provides an amazing 
TGM Lab Report on A-Max, the add-on which 
means major Macintosh electronic publishing 
packages like Quark Xpress and Adobe Illustrator 
83 will run on an Amiga. Some Amiga-only mags 
have said A-Max can run PageMaker 2, but that's 
in the Mac dark ages — you have to read TGM to 
discover the really astonishing truth... 

TGM TX 022:9-89 37 



Choosing a computer is very personal. 
Sometimes It's easy _ there's a fantastic 
game available only for the Compubrill. or a 
great deal on the Budget buster. The Atari ST 
and Amiga computers are great machines, but 
sometimes it's tempting to look towards the 
so-called "rear computers, the IBM and 
Macintoshes which have so much respect _ 
and software. What do you do? You can go out 
and buy an IBM or clone for an extra £500, 
get a Mac SE for over a couple of thousand... 
or you can emulate. 



Atari ST — IBM XT 



Avante Garde's PC-Ditto has 
been a big seller for those 
needing MS-DOS compatabili- 
ty. This software IBM emula- 
tion package enables the 5T 
to become an IBM done. First 
you use a special Menu pro- 
gram which sets up the 
parameters; here you can 
specify which drive will be A 
and B, how many characters 
of text across the screen, 
default colours for CGA mode 
and even simulate a serial 
mouse. And, of course, you 
can designate the printer and 
serial ports. Once this is 
saved as a configuration file, 
you can exit the program and 
then run PC-Ditto, 

The disk dnve will whirr 
and stop, then ask you to 
insert an MS-DOS operating 
system disk (one of the help- 
ful things is that the Atari 3-5- 
inch drive is the same as that 
on an IBM — you can also 
install a 5.25-inch drive). After 
this disk runs, you are pre- 
sented with the famous, and 
boring A> prompt, 

ST users did have one BIG 
complaint about PC-Ditto. 
though: it ran slow, slow, 
slow, about 15% the speed of 
a 4.7 MHz XT This made it 
very tough when displaying 
graphics, and nearly useless 
for games. 

And so comes PC-Ditto II, 
The speculation over this 
HARDWARE device has been 
going on for a while — and 
many thought that it would 
be a plug-in cartridge, AG's 
president. Bill Teal, has the 
latest on the realities of ver- 
sion n. 

'We decided to go with an 
internal board; begins Teal, 
because it's easier to leave 
alone than having to deal 



with popping a cartridge in 
and out, The hoard is only 4x5 
inches and fits inside all the 
STs. even those 520s that 
have installed added memory 
devices. It's a simple installa- 
tion that takes about 20 min- 
utes AH you do is follow the 
instructions for your particu- 
lar ST — remove the cover 
and take off the shielding 
over the motherboard, There's 
no soldering or wire-cutting 
— just fasten two simple clips 
over the 68000 chip, place the 
board down, and close up the 
computer' 

Teal notes that custom gate 
arrays are used to achieve an 
IBM XT clone, a clone that is 
dormant until the PC-Ditto II 
program is run. The program 
even duplicates the bugs that 
are found in the original com- 
puter for greater compatibili- 
ty 

'The advantage now is 
speed,' says Teal,. 'In fact, we 
had to have special programs 
to slow n down to the 4.7 
MHz of the XT so that games 
and the like wouldn't run too 
blindingly fast. Warp speeds 
the system up, while Sublight 
slows it down, Want to talk 
about fast? How about run- 
ning quicker than an XT 10 
Mhz Turbo?' 

Teal is quick to point out 
the few negative sides, 
Joystick support is not includ- 
ed, and n isn't compatible 
with the newer AT series, nor 
will it run OS 2 or 286 com- 
mands. 'But,' he says, '90% Of 
the software out there uses 
the XT standard, and will 
work on our system.' 

'Colour is still in the realm 
of monochrome and four 
colour CGA. hut we've been 
working on this also,' com- 



ments Teal, who points to 
Avante Garde's policy of free 
software upgrades, 

So what about those 
upgrades BilP Okay,' he 
relents, 'we are completing 
four functions that should be 
available before the end of the 
year. The first is 16-colour 
EGA support, which hasn't 
been easy — remember that a 
lot of EGA is activated using 
strange hooks 1 by the pro- 
grammers, and this could 
cause all kinds of confusion, 
Second is that we're going to 
crash the 64 OK barrier, for an 
extended memory system that 
will allow RAM disks, multi- 
tasking and the like. This 
extended memory, by the 
way, is what lets us do EGA.' 

Functions three and four are 



equally interesting. PC-Ditto 
would let you use an 
Epson/compatible printer,' 
says Teal, but PC Ditto n also 
supports the Atari Laser (in 
Epson MX80 emulation). The 
final addition is music: IBM 
MIDI support for the Roland 
MPU-401 synthesizer through 
Atari's built-in MIDI ports. 
That should make a lot of peo- 
ple very, very, happy.' Teal is 
also quick to state that the 
softwareHsnly version of Ditto 
will continue to be sold. 

Having used PC -Ditto H in 
a 1D40ST with excellent 
results, we concur With 
Teal's statement above If 
you want an IBM clone, for- 
get about buying a new 
machine — the ST and PC- 
Ditto II is the way to go. 



A 



Atari SI - Apple Macintosh 




Now for the Mac, which is a 
lot trickier. David Small 
(Gadgets by Small) created 
the Magic Sac some time 
back. This was a cartridge 
which plugged into the ST 
port, and duplicated a Mac 
through software — inside 
the cartridge was the Mac's 
operating system ROM chips. 
Refinements since then 
brought us to Spectre 128 — 
again a cartridge, but one 
containing the 123K ROMs 
necessary to use the 
HyperCard (the mam 

Macintosh database software) 
and other applications Here's 
how you get to the Mac SE 
one meg. black and white 
screen that the Spectre 128 
emulates so well. 

You can leave the cartridge 
plugged in — nothing will 
occur until you activate the 
program (1.9 being the most 
current version}. Up will come 
a configuration window to set 
parameters of memory, sound 
implementation, and format- 
ting of disks (including hard 
disks). The sound driver gives 
you all the beeps and bongs 
you'd expect, and the new 
software lets the ST sort of 
duplicate the digitised sound 
quality of a real Mac (Small 
really outdid himself here 
because this has to be done 
through software), 

Now you let the program 
go. After a short bit, you are 
told to insert a Mac Startup 
disk. Mac disks have to be 



transferred to this format to 
work, because they're truly 
bizarre — a Mac drive speeds 
up and slows down while it's 
working. This is why there's 
the formatting commands, 
because you must use the 
special Spectre format. To get 
programs over to this format 
means connecting the ST to a 
Mac. or downloading a pro- 
gram using the ST and then 
running a conversion pro- 
gram. The only alternative is 
the Translator One device 
that lets Mac disks work in 
the Atari drives. But it 
doesn't always work, costs 
too much, ties up the MIDI 
ports, and is extraordinarily 
slow. 

To continue, the Startup 
disk performs, and WHAM 
there's the Mac welcoming 
screen A few moments later 
and the Mac desktop makes 
its appearance. This screen 
looks best when using a 
monochrome monitor — in 
fact you get a bit more picture 
area as a bonus. Using a 
colour monitor is bearable, 
mostly due to switching 
which lets you scroll between 
a two-screen sized image 
stacked vertically. But this 
eats up memory on a 1040ST 
that keeps HyperCard out of 
the picture, and text looks 
pretty awful. Anyway, now 
you do whatever you want. 
with a few rules peculiar to 
the Mac and Spectre So 
what's to complain? 



38 TGM TX022:9-89 



Centre Bytes 



Just that you can't use Mac 
disks. But that's being 
changed, because Gadgets 
are releasing then GCR cart. 
Standing for Group Coded 
Recording, this new product 
takes care of the funny Mac 
disks direct. Just pop a 
Spectre Or Mac disk in a drive 
and go foi ill GCR plugs into 
the cartridge port and takes 
the Mac ROM chips that were 
in your Spectre cart {ROMs 
can't be sold by Gadgets but 
are available through other 
vendors). A cable is then 
attached from the GCR to 
your external drive, or to the 
external floppy port if you've 
only the internal one. 



Using the cartridge port 
enables the transfer of infor- 
mation at a rate of one million 
characters a second, That 
pretty much says it all. Speed 
is now the norm, 

Printer support on a 
Spectre/GCR includes Epson 
compatibles, the popular HP 
Deskjet (you have to purchase 
a Mac printer driver for 
these), plus the Atari Laser 
printer (Gadgets are still 
working on getting Ultraacript 
to kick in — give Dave a bit 
more time). Gadgets also 
send out a newsletter on an 
irregular basis that is full of 
timely and useful information, 




Amiga — Apple Macintosh 



' 



A-Max, by Readysoft, is simi- 
lar in many ways to the 
Spectre cart. It's also a car- 
tridge which contains the 
128K ROMs, and plugs into 
the computer — in this case 
to the Amiga's external disk 
drive port, Unlike Spectre, A- 
Max has two connectors on 
the back, one for an Apple 
BOOK external drive and the 
other as a pass-through for 
additional Amiga drives, The 
choice here is to either use 
the Apple drive for normal 
Mac disk use. or transfer the 
software as you would do 
with Spectre. 

Let's skip aside the similari- 
ties to Spectre (like configur- 
ing printer and serial ports), 
and focus on the differences. 
Firstly, a number of video 
modes are supported; 
640x400 interlaced. 640x200 
with scrolling. 512x342 inter- 
lace (Mac standard), plus 
1008x800 in use with the 
A2024 or Moniterm Viking 
high- res monitor. PAL support 
is included foi screens up to 
640x512 interlace. But where 
this all gets exciting is in use 
with the new Commodore 
Extended Chip Set (ECS), 
which not only lets you use a 
lot more memory for running 
programs (ECS allows one 
meg of chip RAM), but also 
gives you a 640x400 NON- 
INTERLACED picture 1 

David Foster, President of 
Readysoft, continues to note 
the advantages of A-Max on 
the Amiga A-Max has many 
special features of great 
value; he begins. The 



Preferences program lets the 
user emulate an Apple 
Imagewriter on 9 and 24 pin 
Epson compatibles, and if 
you've a 68020 in the Amiga, 
A-Max will use it too — pro- 
viding you've the 128K ROMs. 
Besides doing the opening 
bong sound and letting you 
change preferences within 
the Mac startup environment, 
it's also worth mentioning 
that you can "hard wire' a 
500/2000 so that it will use 
one meg of continuous memo- 
ry even though you've not the 
new chip set, and there's a 
built-in RAM disk too,' Foster 
also notes that the cartridge 
can be left connected all the 
time, and that A-Max will also 
read Magic Sac and Spectre 
disk formats [doesn't work the 
Other way however). 

Among its pleasures, A- 
Max is able to use a colour 
monitor to get that interlaced 
full screen (not having to see 
a scrunched up colour image 
as on the Spectre/GCR — or 
attaching a monochrome mon- 
itor). Two disadvantages do 
exist, though; one being that 
you can only read information 
from Magic Sac/Spectre disks, 
the other is that A-Max 
doesn't support hard disks 

Hopefully these two areas 
will be addressed soon (in fact 
I have just received a soft- 
ware upgrade to correct minor 
bugs in the starting programs 
— Readysoft aren't slacking). 
These two points aside — A- 
Max does just about every 
thing you could ask foT in a 
Mac emulator. 



Amiga — IBM AT 



The Amiga can also emulate 
an IBM, and does so using an 
internal hardware card from 
Commodore called the 
A2286D Bridgeboard. This 
fills a slot in the 2000 series, 
and provides full AT class MS- 
DOS compatibility. The board 
is activated by running a spe- 
cial library file called Janus — 
and can be used concurrently 
with the Amiga, this because 
of the computer's multitask- 
ing ability. 

The Bridgeboard Is really 
an IBM AT clone, with a 

80286 CPU chip (running at 8 
MHz), one meg of onboard 
RAM, and a socket for an 

80287 maths coprocessor. 
Besides coming with a 1.2 MV 
5.25-inch floppy drive drive 
(which can be installed inside 



the Amiga 2000). a hard disk 
can be shared between MS- 
DOS and AmigaDOS. And the 
Amiga mouse can also emu- 
late a Microsoft mouse, 

Use is simple and exactly as 
you would think when you're 
inside an MS-DOS window — 
graphics run at normal speed 
as they should, although the 
Bridgeboard can only display 
monochrome and GCA graph- 
ics. 

One must keep in mind, 
though, that you could buy an 
IBM clone for less than the 
card — Commodore's own 
Colt IBM-clone sells for about 
half of the retail. But there's 
nothing like watching two dif- 
ferent computers running 
together, and it's a lot easier 
on desk space for surel 







Product Information 



■ A2236D Bridgeboard; Commodore Business Machines (UK), 
Cnmmodore House, The Switchbank, Gardner Road, 
Maidenhead, Berks SL6 ?XA. Tel: (0628) 770088. XT version: 
£460.00 AT version £780.00 

■ A-Max: Readysoft Imported under licence by: Entertainment 
International, 4 The Stannets, Laidon North Trade Centre. 
Basildon, Essex SSI 5 6DJ. Tel: (0268) 541126. £134.95 (ex 
ROMs), £249.95 (inc ROMs) 

■ PC-Ditto n # : Avante Garde, 381 Pablo Point Drive, 
Jacksonville, Florida 32225. $299.95 (US price) 

■ Spectre/GCR*: Gadgets by Small, 4 10 West Littleton, #210- 
211, Littleton, Colorado. Spectre; $199.00 (US price) OCR; 
$299.00 (US price) 

* Grey imports are also available from other outlets in the UK 



Fully Professional Electronic 
Publishing is here on the Amiga. 
How? Turn the page to read the 
TGM Lab Report on A-Max and how 
it can run the two most important 
Macintosh publishing packages 



TGM TX 022:9-89 39 




AMIGA DONS A 
MACINTOSH 



Everybody put up their 
hands who has had the 
slightest yearning for a 
Macintosh (preferably a 
Mad lex)? Thought so, drop 
your hands. 

But I bet anyone who's 
reached the price list stage will 
have been convinced of the 
unlikelihood of ever being able 
to own one. But what about an 
Amiga in Mac clothing (or is it a 
Mac in Amiga clothing?) 
Impossible? Not so says Ready 
Soft Inc and goes on to perform 
a miracle. But is the apparition 
of the A-Max Mac Emulator an 
oplical illusion created by a lot 
of hot air? Lets lake a closer 
look at this hybrid and find out. 

Anyone expecting to invest in 
a £134.95 Mac Emulator and to 
be a proud owner of a Mac 
lookalike will be sorely disap- 
pointed. As with all good things 
in life, a Mac lifestyle is not 



cheap and easy lo come by. A 
quick read through the manual 
convinces that there are a num- 
ber of hurdles and obstacles to 
be overcome. 

For a start, the light grey A- 
Max unit which plugs into the 
external disk drive socket of the 
Amiga comes with two conspic- 
uously empty IC sockets. This is 
where the two Mac ROMs 
should be fitted. No. they are 
not supplied with the base unit, 
and yes, Entertainment 
International Ltd — the UK 
importers of A-Max — can sup- 
ply them to you at extra charge. 
Total price of A-Max with the 
128K ROMs is C249.95- Still, a 
small price to pay for total 
Macability. 

Although there's a choice of 
fitting the old 64 K ROMs instead 
of the new 12BK ROMs, it's rec- 
ommended to use the new 
128Ks because the old ROMs 



won't allow you to read the new 
system disks under the HFS fil- 
ing, system and won't cope with 
68010/20/30 accelerator boards. 
A Hard Disk 20 file is included in 
the A-Max utilities disk which 
overcomes this problem, but 
you're limited lo System 3.2 or 
older! (Latest Mac issue is 
System 6 — finding a System 3 
or under is likely to be difficult) 

What other hidden extra costs 
are there? None really, other 
than the fact that you may want 
to overcome the disk drive 
incompatibility by connecting a 
standard SQ0K external floppy 
disk drive, otherwise you have 
to cope with standard Amiga 
3.5" drives using the special A- 
Max format (which incidentally 
cannot be read by a Mac drive). 
You can however read Magic 
Sac/Speclre 12& (Atari ST Mac 
Emulators) formatted disks sup- 
plied by your Atari ST buddies, 



but you can't write to them 

Also you have to start up first 
time with a Mini Transfer disk 
created on a Mac, which is 
required lo transfer across the 
Mac System and Finder files 
necessary for booting up the 
Mac environment on (he Amiga. 
Which brings us to another 
minor problem! First of all, 
you re not really supposed to be 
pirating Mac software, even il 
you do have a friendly Mac 
owner to hand. In fact. Apple 
are well known to be very 
aggressive in the defence of 
their property and quit© justly 
So. So if you are going to run 
Mac software, system or appli- 
cations, be sure you acquire it 
legally! Assuming you have pur- 
chased the required items, you 
Still need a friendly Mac owner 
to help you put across the 
System and Finder files to your 
A Max Mini Transfer Disk 
(MTD). Easy? Not quite so The 
MTD is limited to 272K and you 
MUST have the System and 
Finder files for a bootable start- 
up disk- Now, System and 
Finder files may easily be of 
megabyte proportions depend- 
ing on the amount of Fonts and 
OAs (see panel) attached lo the 
System — fortunately these can 
be stripped to a bare minimum 
by removing all unnecessary 
items for initial boo! -up. 
However, this still leaves |ust 
over 300K when you use a 
System v5.0 or above. Your 
only option is to find an older 
system (3.2 or lower) in order to 
tit the necessary files 

Having achieved this, things 
ease up. A-Max lets you format 
A-Max disks on the Amiga 3.5" 
drive and provides you with 
every possible option of disk 
and tile transfer to and from 
Mac and AmigaDos. There s a 
better way if you're seriously 
considering running Mac appli- 
actions on your Amiga — save 
the hassle and buy an external 
Mac drive! (Details provided 
below). 

So we have it How does it 
look on the Amiga/Mac? The 
Amiga's booted up in the usual 
way till you're in Workbench. 
The A-Max Startup program on 
the A-MAX PROGRAM DISK 
displays (he startup preferences 
window. This is where video, 
memory and print options are 
chosen. They may be saved for 
future boot-ups. From here it's 
straight to GO MAC and after a 
lengthy setup time the Mac boot 
screen appears. You re now in 
Mac mode? You have the last 
chance of selecting your prefer- 
ences by pressing ihe rfght- 
hand mouse switch and chang- 
ing most of the preferences set 
initially (this gives you the 
chance on Mac shutdown to 
reboot the 'Mac' with changed 
options without having lo reboot 



40 TGM TX022:9-89 



C&ntre Bytes 



VIDEO OPTIONS 



The Mac boot-up occurs in whatever screen mode was set in the 
preferences menu. You may choose between the Mac standard 
format of 512x342 pixels or a 640x51 2- pi *el mode. The imple- 
mentation of this format on the Amiga can be set with the Video 
Mode, which determines how the Mac screen is displayed on the 
Amiga, 

Without any special hardware you can choose between inter- 
lace mode, which displays the entire Mac screen, and non-inter- 
laee, which splits the Mac screen vertically m two. displaying only 
the half in which the cursor is positioned. The A-Max-contralled 
screen follows the cursor position automatically either by fast 
scrolling, slow scrolling or by paging depending on the selection 
you make. The only problem Jies with the aspect ratio: the display 
is vertically stretched (2:1 ) , but it's either that or live with interlace 
in robbing. 

A-Max caters for two more video options, both requiring extra 
hardware. If you install Commodore's Extended Chip Set (if ever 
available here in the UK...), you can operate with a non- interlaced 
display of 4&0 lines, or 960 lines interlaced — assuming you're 
prepared to purchase the appropriate monitor of course. Other 
than that, you may have your eye on set on the A2024 or Viking 
Momterm full-page monitor, which provides a resolution of 
1008x800 <n A2024 mode, 



PRINT OPTIONS 



The Mac has two serial pods and no parallel port. One is the 
modem port the other a printer port, You have the Choice Of con- 
figuring the Amiga serial and parallel pons to either of these Mac 
ports, Pnnting on the Mac is done either by Postscript to ihe 
LaserWriter through the Appletalk netwark or to the Image Writer. 
1 Provision is made to hook I mage Writer emulation to any of the 
two ports. However, even if you do have a Postscript laser printer 
connected to your Amiga, you wont be able to print directly from 
any software applications, First you need to intercept the print 
routine and create a Postscnpt file on disk, which can then be 
sent via a File Dump program provided on the A-Max utility disk in 
a serial or parallel port, or sent to a Postscript bureau for typeset- 
iing. 



the Amiga!) Your 'Mac' may now 
be booted by inserting either the 
MTD or a fullblown A-Max sys- 
tem disk into the Amiga drive, or 



— AAAHH! what a luxury — by 
inserting the real floppy Macoy 
m the external Apple drive. 
A-Max is an excellent Mac 




Essential for the serious user: BOOK Macintosh 3.5" external drive. 
with Adobe Illustrator SB, Quark Xpress and A-Max utilities disk 



MEMORY OPTIONS 



A-Max lets you allocate a variable size of Amiga RAM memory to 
the Mac operating system. All sorts of combinations are provided 
for starting from 12SK righl up to your Amiga RAM total You have 
the option of disabling the second 51 2K of memory in A2000s and 
1 Mb A500& to improve Mac compatibility with some stubborn Mac 
applications. As A-Max has a built-in RAM disk that automatically 
uses any Amiga memory you're not using as A-Max system mem- 
ory, it's best to allow for some Amiga memory to be left over l"he 
A-Max RAM disk is particularly useful because it's recoverable 
and will survive A-Max system reboots, and can be booted Irom it 
it contains the necessary Mac System and Finder files. 



emulator providing a very com- 
patible Mac operating system 
with a very reasonable operat- 
ing speed, The original Mac 
HO Ms and Mac system soft- 
ware guarantee a high degree 
of compatibility as long as the 
application software accesses 
hardware through the Mac oper- 
ating system (the case with 
nearly all major Mac applica- 



tions) and doesni bypass it 
Reflecting this high degree of 
compatibility there's a high entry 
price, but a quick glance at a 
Mac price list will soon convince 
anyone that it still is a bargain. If 
you can't live without a Mac 
environment, but can survive 
screen deficiencies and lack of 
Appletalk and hard disk support, 
A-Max is the solution, 



+++STOP PRE3S+++ ARRIVED: QUARK XPRESS, 
THE PROFESSIONAL MAC PAGE MAKE-UP TOOL 
FOR PROFESSIONAL PUBLISHERS, NOW RUNNING 
ON THE AM3GAI + + + 

+ + +STOP PRESS ARRIVED: ILLUSTRATOR 88, THE 
BEST GRAPHICS PACKAGE FOR THE MAC, NOW 
ILLUSTRATING ON YOUR AMIGAI + + + 



Yes, thanks to Ready Soft Incs 
A-Max Mac Emulator you too 
can new obtain the most profes- 
sional and versatile DTP and 
graphics package to exist on the 
Mac lo run them form your 
Amiga 2000. 

Right, you will say, Where's 
the catch - or is that cash? 

All you need is an Amiga 
£000 preferably with lots of 
RAM memory and an external 
Mac BOOK disk drive. The cost, 
well, if you assume you already 
have an Amiga 2000 with a total 
of 3Mb RAM (2Mb fitted on an 8 
Mb RAM extension board), then 
the purchase of the A-Max emu- 
lator with the 1 28K ROMs fitted, 
the external Mac BOOK disk 
drive, Mac System disks and 
Quark Xpress or Adobe 
Illustrator $$ will set you back 
well over ut.100. Thais 
u249.95 for the A-Max emulator 
with the 128K ROMs fitted. 6250 
for the original 800K Mac exter- 
nal floppy disk (cheaper to go 
for third-party drives although 
you may encounter compatibili- 
ty problems), and the resl for 
the system software and Mac 
application programs 

Whys all that RAM required 
Well, if you're only going to 
operate with one Mac drive, you 
need to make the Mac RAM 
drive {which incidentally resides 
outside the Mac allocated RAM 
area) the active system. This 
would be the procedure to Pool 
and convert the Amiga into a 
Mac iookalike: boot up the 



Amiga as normal. Stan the A- 
MAX STARTUP program on the 
A-Max Program disk. You're 
taken to the A-Max preferences 
window. Set the video and sari- 
al/parallel and Imagewriter emu- 
lation options, For the memory 
Options Select USER and set 
the Mac RAM size to 1,5Mb 
This leaves you with something 
less than 1.5Mb which A-Max 
allocates to the Mac RAM drive, 
Now GO A MAX and after a 
while the Mac boot screen 
appears. Insert the Mac system 
disk and your Mac' boots up 
Press Fl and initialise the RAM 
drive Copy your System Folder 
from the boot -up disk to the 
RAM drive. Now Shutdown the 
system and Restart. By pressing 
Ft during the Mac boot screen 
display you make the RAM drive 
your active system. 

Voilal You now have some- 
thing in excess of 700K on the 
RAM drive [if your onginal boot 
disk had a slimmed down 
System Folder) and can easily 
load Quark Xpress or Illustrator 
88 onto the RAM drive. Startup 
the application from RAM drive 
and you have made free ihe 
external Mac drive ready for 
normal data tiling duties. Whats 
more, operating from RAM drive 
avoids disk loading delays and 
makes up lor the little speed 
penalty incurred on the Amiga 
(compared to the Mac II), 

Is it worth it? If you compare 
Quark Xpress with Professional 
Page (which is totally unfair due 



TGM TX 022:9-89 41 



to ihe price differences!) you 
may start to understand why the 
Mac gained its Number One 
positron in the electronic pub- 
lishing field 1 ., same's true of 
Adobe's illustrator 88. 

Your main problem however 
is that after having spent all tbai 
money, you still don't have a 
complete Mac system — the 
lack of trie Appletalk network 
environment and of any hard 
disk support on A-Max are 
heavy penalties. For one, hard- 
copy printing must be done by 
generating Postscript files 
(described in main article) 
Alternatively you can supply Jhe 
Postscript tile on a Mac disk to 
a Mac owner or Postscript 
bureau for laser printing or 
type/image setting. A-Max does 
provide an Image Writer emula- 
tion program, which allows you 
to us* a 9 pin or 24-pin Epson 
compatible printer on the serial 
or parallel port of your Amiga. 
Hard disk support may be pro- 
vided on future upgrades. This 
certainly is a requirement, as 
anybody who's been working on 
a Mac knows what mega file 
sizes have to be transferred 
even for the simplest jobs. 

As to the compatibility? So far 
no problems. The mainstream 
programs, which have been 
written within the strict 



Macintosh operating system 
protocol all run perfectly well. 
Care has to be taken with pro- 
grams which access hardware 
directly, such as Midi software, 
copy -protected software, games 
and certain types of shareware. 
Giffer, a graphics compacting 
and translation program would 
not load, for instance. 

Last, but not leasi, the video 
modes. Unless you want to 
walk around with constantly 
strobing eyes and you don't 
have a flicker fixer, avoid inter- 
lace at all costs. A-Max does 
provide an option to change the 
two colours from the normal A- 
Max option to the Workbench 
default and if suitable default 
colours are selected, the strob- 
ing can be minimised. 

Beyond these minor differ- 
ences from a real Mac, all our 
Mac operators agreed that 
using Quark Xpress or 
Illustrator 88 on an Amiga was 
immediately familiar, The Amiga 
key doubles instantly as the 
Mac Apple key, so Xpress users 
who know all their key com- 
mands rather than using the 
pull down menus, can get going 
straight away. A Max keeps all 
those intuitive methods of work- 
ing. The same's Irue in 
Illustrator 88, a vector graphics 
program which uses Postscript 



SYSTEM, FONTS & DAs 



The great strength of the Mac is its software systems control It 
ensures applications compatibility, and as Apple designers 
improve the Systems program, users can be sent cheap upgrades 
which are simply installed to effectively upgrade their Mac The 
System file basically runs the computer. The Finder speaks for 
itself, noting where files go to and from so they can be found 
again, operating dialogue boxes and generally acting as a disk 
operating system front-end. 

Given that the computer's system is software-driven, it follows 
that you can attach other types of file to the System on a tempo- 
rary basis. Fonts are typefaces — different sorts of letter design 
(this is called Helvetica, the headlines are in Franklin Gothic and 
most of the rest of Centre Bytes is set in Glypha, for instance). 
Postscript fonts provide immensely high resolution and quality; but 
are heavy on chip memory. If you want a lot available, the Mac 
environment allows you to toad them (or attach them to the 
System), You may have 100 sitting on a hard disk somewhere 
(several megabytes), but by using a program called Font'DA 
Mover, only the fonts you want to use can be attached to the 
System file and then appear in most applications such as Quark 
Xpress. They can be removed as easily and replaced with others. 
Desk Accessories (DAs) are small programs which provide 
facilities which can be accessed (from under the Apple Menu) in 
any application while it's running. These can range from the useful 
(calculator or alarm dock) to the essential (colour display, printer 
status, external disk mounting) to the utterly silly (amazing sound 
samples instead of bongs for alarm sounds). There are hundreds 
available at charge, in PD and as shareware- 
Depending on what environment you want to work in. Fonts and 
DAs can amount to megabyte-plus additions to the basic System 
file, which is why they must be stnpped out with Font/DA Mover 
before the System file becomes small enough to be copied across 
to the A-Max MTD. 

This is also where the Mac's great flexibility comes in. You can 
create many boot-up disks tor different jobs with the Fonts and 
DAs you need for each different fob already attached to the 
System, Thus your Mac, or Amiga/Mac, becomes whatever type 
of computer you want for a specific job 




Top: drawing of a Mac II On an Amiga in Adobe Uluslrator 88 (Ihe 
preview version can be seen at Ihe top of the previous spread), 
and below It, one of last month's TGM review pages taken straight 
off a Mac-format disk but seen on the Amiga 



paths to describe open or 
enclosed areas which can then 
be filled with colours, or ihe 
lines given a weight and 
coloured [called stroking). It's 
as simple as it sounds (but 
complex to get to know), and is. 
simply, one of the most power- 
ful graphics packages ever 
developed. Graphics made in 
Illustrator 88 can be saved in 
various file formats, but most 
importantly as an Encapsulated 
Postscript File (EPSF), which 
provides a low resolution image 
for importing into page maker 
programs, from where, when 
the page is printed, the real 
image goes as well as ihe text, 
and in full printers' process 
colours il thats the type of work 
you're doing. 

We promised an article on 
how TGM is done using the 
Mac, but felt it wasn't entirely 
relevant at the time. Now time 
has caught up, and in fufure 
issues of TGM. Centre Bytes 
and the TGM labs will be bring- 



ing more detailed articles on the 
use of Quark Xpress and 
Illustrator 88 for Amiga owners 
who can now use the programs 



THE PRODUCTS 



A-Max Version 1.0 
Macintosh emulator for the 
Amiga: Ready Soft inc., avail- 
able from Entertainment Int. 
Ltd 0268 541126. Excluding 
Mac HOMs HRP £134,95 inc 
VAT; fitted with 1?8KMac 
ROMs RRP £249 95 

Apple external 3.5 ' 800 K 
disk drive, E287.5G inc VAT. 
available from Digital Print 
Services Ltd. 05 1 630 6288 

Quark Xpress, Adobe 
Illustrator 88 and all other 
Macintosh based products 
available from Digital Print 
Services Ltd, 



42TGMTX022:9-89 



Centre Bytes 



INFORMATION DESK 



Are computer auctions much kop? And where can 
you buy Atari VCS cartridges? The Centre Bytes 
gurus dive into the postbag once more to answer 
your questions... 

Making the 
grade 



I am a potential upgrader to 
either the ST or Amiga. 
However, I ant worried about 
compatibility problems 
between the newer models 
and existing software. 
Huw Dairies, 
Hemel Hempstead, 
At TGM the only compatibili- 
ty problem we've experienced 
is with the Older 520 STFMs 
disk drive. As it is single- 
sided you cant retrieve some 
information stored on a dou- 
ble-sided disk. All STFMs 
now come fitted as standard 
with a doubie-sided drive so 
there shouldnl beany prob- 
lems While the Amiga hasnt 
given us any worries (yet). 



Is there any- 
body out 
there? 

Tve recently bought a PC 
Engine and am very happy 
with it, Unfortunately 1 don't 
know anyone else who owns 
one. Do you know of any PC 
Engine user clubs? 
Stephen Penfold, Rhyl. 
PC Engine owners are a small 
select band and should stick 
together. The PC Engineers 
are a group of PC Engine 
users based in Leicester 
They've just set up their own 
user club and each month 
members receive a newsletter 
which covers all aspects of 
the PC Engine. There is also a 
facility to swap unwanted 
games with other PC Engine 
users. PC Engineers: 6 Gelen 
Ave, Leicester LE5 2NS. 



Southgate Technical College, 
London N14 Generally auc- 
tions are great places to buy 
secondhand PCs, but not so 
hot for STs or Amigas. Most of 
the stuff is ex-office equip- 
ment and generally m good 
working order — but there axe 
no guarantees' There are 
usually several models of each 
item, if you want to pick up a 
good bargain (like a cheap 
printer) dont bid for the first 
[ew items as these always go 
for a higher price, save your 
bidding for the last few when 
most people have lost interest. 



Going, going, 
gone. 

Could you please tell me the 
addresses of any computer 
autioneers in the Avon or 
London area. Are they good 
places to buy Amigas, STs 
and PCs. 

Sean Batten, Bristol, 
There's a computer auction on 
the 2nd September at 



Simulation 
frustration 

Tm an avid simulation game 
fan but I'm getting bored with 
flight sims. they all seem a bit 
samey to me. Could you rec- 
ommend any other types of 
simulation game? I own an 
Amstrad 1640FC 
Matthew Kennedy, 
High Wycombe 
The PC really does seem to be 
the machine to go for if you're 
interested in simulations; 
there are just so many avail- 
able. If you're getting bored 
with flight sims you could 
always try tank simulations 
(Abrams Battle Tank from 
Electronic Arts) or submarine 
sims (688- Attack Sub from 
Electronic Aits and Red Storm 
Rising from MicroPrase are 
both recommended). There's 
also the vast range of car sim- 
ulations (Ferrari Formuia One, 
agam from Electronic Arts, 
and, probably better 
Accolade's Duel; Test Drive 11). 
Electronic Arts: Langl&y 
Business Centre, 11-49 Station 
Road, Langley, near Slough, 
Berkshire SL3 8YN. Tel: (0753) 
49442. MicroProse: Unit 1, 
Hampton Head Industrial 
Estate, Tetbury Gloucester 
GL8 8LD. Tel: (06§6) 54326. 



Cartridge 
blues 

I've recently bought an Atari 
Video Games console. 
Unfortunately tm having prob 
lems getting hold of car- 



MIDI 
madness 

rve just started a band with a 
couple of friends, We're using 
two synthesizers [both with 
MIDI ports), an ST and an 
Amiga with Datel's Midi 
Master. We were hoping to 
Link them all up and use the 
Amiga as a drum machine. 
Could you suggest a setup? 
What software would we 
need? 

John Hicks, Warrington, 
It's a little difficult to tell you 
the ideal setup since you 
dent say in your letter what 
you intend to do with the syn- 
thesizers; whether you're 
going to sequence them, play 
live to a drum track or a com- 
bination of both. If you're only 
going to play live then you 
don't really need MIDI. Just 
load your drum track into the 
Amiga, play and away you 
go. If want to sequence the 
synths and use the Amiga for 
a drum machine then you will 
need to use MIDI. The ST is 
the master device and sends 
MIDI messages to all the 
other devices in the system. 
The diagram shows how to 
setup your MIDI system Set 
the MIDI channel receive 
options as follows: Synth 1 
channel h Synth 2 channel 2, 
and the Amiga channel 3. 
We're assuming that your 
synths arent multi-timbral. 



but if they are then that's no 
problem just make sure that 
the Amiga is receiving MIDI 
information on a different 
channel from the synths This 
setup allows you to sequence 
all the devices and to a limit- 
ed degree play at the same 
time. When you want to 
record a sequence into the 
sequencer software on the ST 
just follow the instructions on 
recording in the sequencer's 
manual and play the 
sequence on Synth 1 . As for 
software you're spoUt for 
choice on the ST. There are 
sequencers available to suit 
most price ranges — watch 
out for a TCM sequencer spe- 
cial soon While the best 
Amiga drum machine has got 
to be Bullfrog's A drum 
(£35 95). The program can 
handle up to 26 samples at 
one go and play back four at a 
time — one for each of the 
Amiga's sound channels. It's 
also MTDI-compatible. 
Bullfrog Productions: 3 Bridge 
Street, Guildford, Surrey GUI 
4RY 



r* 


i 


H 


Thru Qui In 

SYNTH 1 




Out In 
ST 




tridges. Do you know of any 
stockists. 

Robert Boom, Leeds. 
The A tan Games Console 
seems to be makmg a bit of a 
comeback but as yet the car- 
tridges arent widely available. 
However, Silica Shop stocks 
most Atari products including 
VCS cartridges. Send an SAE 
for a full list of products and 
prices. Silica Shop: 1 -4 The 
Mews, Hatherley Road, 
Sidcup. Kent DAI 4 4DX. Tel: 
(01)3091111. 



Perplexed by ports? 
Struggling with hardware 
scrolling? Muddled by 
monitors? Send all your 
computing questions to 
Information Desk, TGM, PO 
BOX 10, Ludlow, Shropshire 
SYS 1DB. We regret, due to 
the pressures of magazine 
schedules, personal corre- 
spondence can not be 
entered into, but the 
stamps come in handy. 



Buying from 
Mail Order 

At TGM we often receive let- 
ters from readers complaining 
about the service they get 
from mail order companies 
who advertise m the maga- 
zine — not many, but impor- 
tant to those who write them 
There are some rogue com- 
panies about, but the majority 
are straightforward and hon- 
est Having run mail order 
ourselves for many years, 
we're well aware that it's 
often software houses who let 
dealers down on delivery 
dates of newly released prod- 
uct. SO, to avoid disappoint- 
ment, before sending off that 
Cheque in the post, ring the 
company up first and make 
sure what you want is in 
stock — it's easier than sort- 
ing out the problem later. If 
there is no phone number 
don't use that company 1 



TGM TX 022:9-89 43 




REPAIR 




No matter how much i 
for a computer, eventi 
something goes wrong. 

And you can bet your life it'll 
happen after the guarantee 
has expired, so you can forget 
about sending it back to the 
manufacturers. In most cases, 
they won't want to know. 

Before packing your comput- 
er off to a repair firm, check to 
see if your local computer deal- 
er can recommend a local 
repair outfit . 

Phone the company you 
choose and try to get a rough 
guide of the cost of the repair. 
how long it will take — and 
whether they'll give a warranty 
to do it again for tree if the 
repair doesn't work. 



Make sure that the quoted 
price includes parts, labour, 
VAT. and return postage. 

When sending your computer 
by post, pack it carefully — 
preferably in the original box. 

Always include a letter with 
your name, address, and tele- 
phone number and the effects 
of the fault. 

Send the whole package by 
recorded delivery — just 24p 
on top of the stamp cost — 
and pay the extra cash for an 
advice-of-delivery slip (25p if 
you ask for it when yog post 
the package, 65 p if you leave 
It till later), 

That way you know It s got 
there. 



■ Al Computer Services. 
Unit 9, Paddock Mount 
Offices, Dawley, Telford, 
Shropshire TF4 3PR (0952] 
502737. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED 

'Virtually any computer' — 

including Spectrum, C64/128, 

BBC, 16-bits, C16, Vic20and 

Plus 4 

PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 

Printers; also full disk-drive 

service for £25. 

PRICES Mostly E25-£3D, but 

C12B is £42.50. 

WARRANTY Three months. 

■ ACE Repair*. 

Outways Farm, Pelynt. Lose. 
Cornwall. FL13 2NW {0503) 
20232. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED Major 
tusker except Atari ST. 
PERIPHERALS REPAtRED 
Sinclair Interface 1 and 
Microdrive. Amstrad disk 
drives and printers and 
Commodore disk drives, print- 
ers and datacorders. 
PRICES From £15 upwards 
depending on fault 
WARRANTY Six months. 
INFORMATION Sinclair, 
Amstrad and Commodore 
spares and leads. 

■ Ampower Video and 
Computers, 

15A Alcester Rd, Studley. 
Warks, BB0 7AJ(0527} 
853374 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED All 3- 
hi! ;ind 16 -bit machines. 
PERIPHERALS Printers, moni- 
tors, disk drives etc, 
PRICE Phone for information 
WARRANTY Three months, 

■ BCL (Be*t Computers Ltd). 

Galaxy Audio Visual, first 



floor, 230 Tottenham Court 
Road, London W1A 3AP (01) 
631-0139 or 5BG-6640 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED All 8- 
bit and 16-bit including PCs, 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED All. 
PRICES A typical small repair 
would cost C15-E20. 
WARRANTY Six months. 
INFORMATION Free estimates. 
Galaxy Audio Visual also sell 
micros. 

■ Cambridge Micro Surgery. 
Unit 4. 377B Cherry Hinton 
Road, Cambridge CB1 4DH 
(0223) 410234 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED 
Spectrum. G64. BBC, Amstrad. 
PCs. 

PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Printers, monitors, disk 
drives etc. 

PRICES Cheapest is 48K 
Spectrum at £18 95 plus cost 
of parts; others from £23.50. 
WARRANTY Three months 
INFORMATION Will provide 
annua] maintenance for busi- 
ness micros, on a contract 
basis. 

■ The Computer Factory. 
Analytic Engineering Ltd, 
Unit 1BA, Grainger Road 
industrial Estate, Southend 
SS2SDD (0707) 618455. 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED All 
major models except Aran. 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED Disk 
drives and printers. 
PRICES E7-C40. 
WARRANTY Three months 
INFORMATION Free estimates. 

■ Electronic & Computer 

Services. 

1000 Uxb ridge Road, Hayes, 

Middlesex UB4 0RL 

(01)573-2100. 



COMPUTERS REPAIRED The 
full range of home computers 
— that includes all the weD- 
known 8-bit and 16-bit 
machines, 

PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Electronic 8t Computer 
Services will repair some 
peripherals, but write or 
phone for details m case yours 
isn't included. 

PRICES According to the prob- 
lem Phone for a quote. 
WARRANTY Write or phone for 
details. The warranty only 
covers the problem repaired, 
not the whole computer, 
INFORMATION Turnaround 
varies, depending on the prob- 
lem, from two days to a week. 

Electronic & Computer 
Services also sell spare parts. 
Again, write or phone for 
details. 

■ Hlndtey Electronics. 

97 Market Street, Hmdley, 
Wigan. Lancashire WN2 3AA 
(0942) 522743. 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED 
Spectrum. C 16/64, Vic20, CPC, 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED Some 
PRICES Set price for each 
machine, ranging from El 7 
(48K Spectrum) to £25. 1541 
disk dnves £32.50. 
WARRANTY Three months, 
INFORMATION Average two- 
day turnaround — well quick- 
er than the average. 

■ HS Computer Services. 
Unit 2. The Orchard, Warton, 
Preston. Lancashire PR4 1BE 
(0772) 6326E6. 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED All 
Spectrums. 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 

Phone. 

PRICES From £14.95. 

WARRANTY Three months 

■ Hytek Computer (Rentals) 
Unit 4C, Yeovale Industrial 
Estate, Lapford, Crediton, 
Devon (03635) 604 
COMPUTER REPAIRED Major 
makes, including Acorn 
PERIPHERALS Most major 
makes. 

PRICES Fixed price list avail- 
able on request. 
WARRANTY Three months. 

■ Ladbroke Computing 
international. 

33 Ormskirk Road, Preston. 
Lancashire PR1 2QP 

(0772) 21474 or 27Z36. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED Mainly 

Atan. 

PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 

Printers and disk drives. 



PRICES According to machine 
— for example ST £34 50, 
XL/130 XE £23 (these prices 
include VATJ. 

WARRANTY Phone for informa- 
tion. 

■ Microtech Computer 
Services. 

216-219 Cotton Exchange 
Building. Old Hall Street, 
Liverpool L3 9LA 
(051) 236-220B 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED ST. 

Amiga. BBC. Amstr-. 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Printers, monitors, also elec- 
tric typewriters and other 
office equipment, 
PRICES Start from £30 — call 
M;ke Lopez at Microtech for a 
quote. 
warranty Three months. 

■ MP Electronics. 
Wendling. Dereham, Norfolk 
NR19 2L2 (0362) 87327. 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED 
Spectrum, C64. BBC B, PCs — 
in fact ail major makes except 
ST and Amiga. 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Printers, plotters, monitors, 
disk dnves etc. 

PRICES All-inclusive prices for 
most machines — 48K 
Spectrum £15, 128K Spectrum, 
BBC B and C64 £27 50. PCs 
from £20- £100+ These rates 
cover all faults except those 
caused by other people's 
botched repairs! 
warranty Phone for 
information. 

INFORMATION Free estimates. 
£20 repair and overhaul ser- 
vice for 4BK Spectrums — MP 
Electronics replace sockets, 
keyboard membrane etc and 
will repair any faults that 
develop within sue months of 
overhaul. 

■ Ortec Micro Computer* 
QRC GEC ITEC, GEC Switch 
Gear, Distribution Division, 
Higher Openshaw. 
Manchester Mil 1FL (061) 
301-2210. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED All 
home micros and PCs 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Printers, monitors and disk 
drives. 

PRICES Depends on fault — 
phone for details, 
WARRANTY Three months 

■ PM Engineering. 

Unit S, New Road. St Ives. 
Cambridgeshire PE17 4BG 
(0480) G1394 



Attention 



i 



repair firms - 

If you would like a mention In 
the Back Bytm repair page*, 
pteaM wnd the relevant 
details to Bach Byte*. TOM. 
PO Bqx 10. Ludlow. Shropshire 
SYS 1DB. Including a phone 
number and the manager' i 
name (for our files). 



44 TGM TX022:9-89 



Centre Bytes 



COMPUTERS REPAIRED All 

home computers 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 

Printers, monitors and disk 
drives. 

PRICES Phone There's a set 
t epair price for each comput- 
er, regardless of the fault and 
including ail parts and labour. 
WARRANTY Three months. 

■ RA Electronics. 

133 London Road South, 

Lowestoft, Suffolk, NR33 QAX 

(0502) 5662 B9. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED AD 

Spectmms 

PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 

Phone. 

PRICES Spectrum 48K £14, 

Spectrum 128KE20. 

information RA Electronics 

also se!) components. 

■ Roebuck Designs. 
Victory Works, Birds Hill, 
Letch worth, Hertfordshire 
SG6 1HX (0462) 480723 or 
4BQ929. 

JOYSTICKS REPLACED 

Roebuck Designs run a clever 
joystick- replacement service 
which offers faster 
turnaround than a repair firm 
might 

Send in your broken joystick 
— any model — and they'll 
send back a second-hand but 
working siick of the same 
model Later, they repair 
yours and pass it on to anoth- 
er customer. 

PRICE £4.50 including return 
postage 

■ Telegames. 

KiLby Bridge, Wigston, 
Leicestershire LE8 1TE 
(0533) 880445 or 813606, 
CONSOLES REPAIRED Atari 
VCS2600, Colecovision, 
Intell i vision, Sega, 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Phone to ash, 
PRICES VCS2G0Q £17 95, 
Colecovision £14.95, 
Intelhvision £19.95. Sega 
£14.95 

WARRANTY 90 days. 
INFORMATION Telerjames 
promise to return the console 
to you just three days after 
they've received it. They're 
also the official UK repair cen- 
tre for Sega and Colecovision- 

■ Venan Micro-Maintenance. 
Albany Park. Frimley Road, 
Camberley. Surrey GUI 5 2PL 
(0376) 662G6. 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED 
Spectrum. Amstrad, 
Commodore. 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Printers, monitors. 

PRICES Range from £19 95 for 

Spectrum to £96 for Amstrad 

PC1512. 

INFORMATION Established six 

years. Approved by Amstrad. 

■ Video Vault 

140 High Street West, 
Glossop, Derbyshire SKI 3 8HJ 
(04574) 66555. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED Most 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 



Phone. 

PRICES From £19 95. accord- 
ing to machine. 
WARRANTY Three months 
INFORMATION Wrule-you-wait 
service m Manchester. 

■ VSE Technical Services. 
Unit 6, 8 Nursery Road, 
London SW9 8BP (01) 738- 
7707. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED All 
Spectrum, Amstrad, Atari and 
Commodore models. 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED OpuS 
Discovery drive (partner Ian 
Vaudrey is official repairper- 
son for the Sinclair Discovery 
Club). 

PRICES Each model has a set 
price which covers all repairs 
except very major ones like 
keyboard or disk- drive 
replacement. Spectmms range 
from £1290 to £17.90; C64 is 
£19.90, C128 £24 90; CPCs 
range from £21.90 Co £24.90; 
all PCWs are £31-90 

Parts, labour, VAT and 
return postage within the UK 
are all included. 
WARRANTY Four months. 

■ Wight Computing Home 
Micros. 

122 High Street, Ryde, Isle of 
Wight POS3 2SU (09 33) 68978 
COMPUTERS REPAIRED Most 
PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Printers and monitors, but 
check first that the service is 
available for older models, 
PRICES According to the 
problem. 

WARRANTY 90 days, 
INFORMATION Wight 
Computing will also check, 
clean etc computers which 
are not obviously faulty, 

■ WTS Electronics. 

Studio Master House, Chaul 

End Lane, Luton, 

Bedfordshire LU4 BEZ (0682) 

491949. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED AU 

home computers. 

PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 

Printers, disk drives, 
modems etc. 

PRICES Very competitive on 
all models.' 

WARRANTY Three months 
INFORMATION WTS 
Electronics promise to com- 
plete the repair within one 
week from the day they 
receive the machine. 
Authorised Amstrad/Smclair 
repair firm. 

■ Wynter Electronics. 
Umt 30F, Atlas Village, 
Qxgate Lane. Staples Corner, 
London NW2 7HU (01) 452- 
5660. 

COMPUTERS REPAIRED 
Spectrum, Commodore, BBC, 
Atari PCs. 

PERIPHERALS REPAIRED 
Phone for details 
PRICES £18 upward, depend- 
ing on machine. 
WARRANTY Three months. 
INFORMATION Repair done in 
one week. 



TELEGAMES 



Europe's Largest Stock of Video Games & Cartridges for - 

■M£V 

Q^ 
MOW 

ClMinTendo) 

SEGA MEGADRIVE NOW AVAILABLE 

WICO JOYSTICKS FOR NINTENDO IN STOCK NOW V 

The leading Video game specialists. 

Send for lists (state make of game) 

TELEGAMES, WIGST0N, LEICESTEfl, LES 1TE (0533-880445) 




SUPERVISION ELECTRONICS 



SEGA MELA 
DRIVE 



I*C ENGINE 
CD ROM UMT 



VIDEO GAMES & CARTRIDGES FOR:- 

N1NTENTJO 

TAMIL* 

COMPUTER 

U< -■! arrivti from Japan Tin- hw Situation of Id Bit Sega the new 12 

Bit family Nintendo. PC Engine and CD Rom Interface unit. New 
design joysticks and pUntif af exciting new games are in stock NOW! 

Ma] I Order please make chetnjt-*» anti pwUL i*rJors pay<itik- In 

Supervision Electronics. 



! ■ 1 1 . . r 1 1 ■ uf, with your Accessor Visa details tin ' 0602475151 
I t MANMII.LDROAD, NOTTINGHAM, NCI 3FB 



ES 



£165.00 Inch FREE GAME 
PAL OR SCART 



drunken Maaiar 


19-U 


*JlM»Cruah(r>inl>ali> 


26.95 


Wpn^nrboy II 


19 95 


Son Son II 


2T.95 


Chan £ Chan 


1».9» 


Waiura 


27.95 


TbIos Honsierpaih 


19.95 


T*1nCgbfHTIo»rrh*ll| 


29 95 


Spat* Harror 


Mb 


Dungeon Eiplorsr 


M85 


B TVp* I or R Type I 


Z4.SS 


P4T 


W.tS 


Vtgllanlc 


2*95 


Fin* 1 Lip - n&* 


MM 


Galaga '96 


14.95 


Nlnja Warrtwa ■ naw 


w.« 


Victory Hun 


2*95 


Gun H*a4 ■ m* 


»« 


Fantstv Zona 


MM 


Paelano - new 


3S.9S 


Hoforaadtr 


26.95 


Cybfcroai naw 


71 »5 


World Court TvnrM* 


25.M 


WrEilllng - new 


3*» 


Leojcndnry fcir 


26.95 


Side *rma - na<" 


29/95 



SEGA 16 BIT MEGADRIVE (SCART) 175 - TV VERSION SOON 
PC Engine joysticks available p&p £5 machines, £1 games 

Cheques and P.O'a'SAE lor full price- list to: 

RAVEN GAMES L QHDON, §6 Dwtum Rosd. flr«uJito|f, Kent 8R2 QSW 

Tel: Of 464 2S33 



3 1/2" DISKS 

EVEN BETTER DISKS - EVEN LOWER PRICE 



10x3 1/2 
25X3 1/2 
50x3 1/2 
100x3 1/2 
250x3 1/2 
500x3 1/2 
1000x3 1/2 



DS/DD 
DS/DD 
DS/DD 
DS/DD 
DS/DD 
DS/DD 
DS/DD 



8.50 

19,00 

37.00 

72.00 

16000 

310.00 

599 00 



Ordering 100 disks or less? 

Use our credit card hotline 

ACCESS - 0742 726435- V«SA 

Trade enquiries welcome. 

Dial our M.D Direct on- 

0742 725353 



"Our disks are cheap but they are top quality - 

LI FETI M EG U ARA NTEE D" 

SAME DAY DESPATCH. PRICES INCLUDE V.A.T AND NEXT DAY 



HARDWARE DISTRIBUTION (dept CM) 

19 DIVISION STREET, SHEFFIELD SI 4GE 

0742 726485 



TGM TX 022:9-89 45 






TOOLBOX ■ For the harder things in life 



AMSTRAD PCW 



The sheet's 
hit the fan 

Amstrad have just launched 
an automatic sheet feeder 
(£113.85) for the Amstrad 
PCW9512- The feeder can 
hold up to 30 sheets at once 
and accepts A4-siae paper of 
weights up to 82gsm. Also 
included in the package are 
modified versions of 

LotoScript and CP/M, 

Amstrad: B rent wood 

House, 169 Kings Road, 
Brentwood, Essex CM14 4EF. 
Tel: (0277} 230222. 



PRINTERS 



Swift stuff 

No sooner than last month's 
printer guide had been fin- 
ished but what should arrive 

through the post but details 
of the latest Citizen 24 -pin 
printer. The Swift 24 prints at 
speeds of 1 92cps draft quality 
and 64cps letter quality, 
comes complete with four let- 
ter quality fonts and a built-in 
BK buffer (which can be 
expanded up to 40K at extra 
cost), An optional seven 
colour card can be bought for 
£38 making the Swift 24 one 
of the cheapest 24-pin colour 
printers available A resolu- 
tion of 360 x 360 dots per inch 
makes it ideal for graphics 
and word processing alike. 

Citizen: Wellington House, 
4/10 Cowley Road, Uxbridge, 
Middlesex UBB 2XW. Tel: 
(0895)72621 



ATARI ST 



Bundles of 
goodies 

Computer distributors 

Parkfield Communications 
have announced a new bun- 
dle for the 1040 STFM (£499) 
Included with the computer is 
£220 of free software includ- 
ing Hyperpamt, Hyperdraw, 
Organiser and First Basic. You 
also get a £50 voucher 
towards three Atari pack- 
ages- Borodino, Backgammon 
and Bridge Master. 

Meanwhile, fellow distributor, 
Hugh Symons has decided to 
add an extra three titles to the 
normal ST Powerpack. The 



free extras are Star Raider, 
Fmal Legacy and 

Backgammon. However, both 
these companies are distribu- 
tors of computers and there- 
fore only sell to shops, with 
their recommended price, so 
look around the independents 
to find the best bundle. 



AMIGA 



And the 
word is... 

Kuma Computers Ltd have 
converted their popular word 
processing aid K-Roget 
(£29.95} to the Amiga. Based 
on Longmans Pocket Roget's 
Thesaurus, K-Roget contains 
over 150.000 words and phras- 
es The program also incorpo- 
rates a phonetic spell checker 
— mismatched words are 
highlighted and the user is 
given a list of possible alterna- 
tives. However, to use the pro- 
gram your Amiga system 
must include either two disk 
drives or a hard disk. More 
information on the K- series 
can be found in last issue's 
Centre Bytes (page 37) where 
we reviewed the K-Word 2 
word processor, for the Atari 
ST 

Kuma Computers Ltd: 12 
Horseshoe Park. Pangboume, 
Berks RGB 7JW. Tel; (07357) 
4335 



Guide to 
style 

Prose checkers are notoriously 
expensive. However, 

Scandinavian PG Systems' 
package runs in at only £49.95 
[on either 6.25- or 3. 5- inch 
disk). The menu -driven pro- 
gram examines your docu- 
ment to see how it compares 
with other styles of writing, 
including general purpose, 
advertising copy, novels, mag- 
azine features, technical 
reports and children's books. 
Results of sentence and style 
analysis are shown graphical- 
ly next to an idealised set of 
results to quickly highlight 
problem areas. At such a low 
price it's well worth investi- 
gating. 

Scandinavian PC Systems 
(UK) Ltd: Freepost Ickenham, 
Uxbridge UB10 8BR. Tel: 
(0895) 679367. 



ARCHIMEDES 



Rock me 
Armadeus 

Clares Micro Systems have 
just launched a sound sampler 
board [£149.95) and software 
(£79.95) for the Archimedes. 
The Armadeus board offers 64 
levels of software, selectable 
gain, stereo input and high- 
quality line output. The soft- 
ware is not only compatible 
with Clares' own sampler but 
also a whole range of readily 
available samplers including 
the Armadillo 

448/448b/448mb, the 

Wild vision ADC 1208 board 
and the UNILA8 general pur- 
pose A to D interface with 
sampling rates of up to 
83KHz! The software allows 
you to read Atari ST disks to 
convert samples to 

Archimedes format. Echo, 
fade in/out and reverse are a 
few of the comprehensive 
editing facilities available. 

Clares Micro Supplies: 98 
Middlewich Road. Northwich, 
Cheshire. Tel: (0606) 48511. 



ATARI ST 



Going 
public 



ST owners in search of cheap 
public domain software need 
look no further than Paradise 
Computers PDL. There are no 
membership fees and all soft- 
ware retails at 75p (excluding 



disk} or £1.50 including disk. 
For a full catalogue send an 
A4 SAE. Next month in 
Centre Bytes, we'll be taking 
a comprehensive look at the 
whole area and concept of 
public domain software. Don't 
miss it 1 

Paradise Computer PDL: 9 
Westfield Crescent, Brighton. 
East Sussex BN1 8JB 



SPECTRUM 



You live and 
lerm 

Lerm Software have been 
releasing transfer utilities for 
the Spectrum since the year 
dot Their latest utility for 
microdrive owners, the Lerm 
Micromate (£11.99), formats 
cartridges with up to 20% 
more space, repairs files, 
graphically displays the con- 
dition of a cartridge, includes 
rename and copy cartridge 
options as well as a host of 
other other options to make 
cartridge management easier. 

Microdrive owners wishing 
to transfer games to cartridge 
are well catered for. Transfer 
Pack 5 [£12) is capable of 
transferring many of todays 
popular games. While three 
information books (£2 50 
each) provide details on trans- 
ferring some of the more inge- 
niously protected programs. 
Microdrive cartridges are also 
available at £1.75 each (mini- 
mum order 4). And, remem- 
ber, all those dongles that 
allow snapshotting d! pro- 
grams (like the Romantic 
Hobot's Multiface series) may 
be banned as of August 1, 
due to new legislation. 

Lerm Software: 11 
Beaconsfield Close, Whitley 



JOYSTICKS 



Blast from the past 



Veteran joystick designers 
Spectravideo (remember the 
Quickshot series?) have 
launched a new joystick, the 
QS-118 Wizmaster (£11,95). 
Facilities include two differ- 
ent control mecha- 
nisms, two fire but- 
tons and an autofire 
switch. There are 
three versions avail- 
able, allowing com- 
patibility with most 
makes of popular 
home computer. An 
infra-red remote 
control version is 
also planned for the 
Nintendo later this 



Spectravideo Ltd: 

Abingdon Industrial Park, 7 
Biacluands Way. Abingdon, 
Oxon 0X14 1SU. Tel: (0235) 

555455. 




46 TGM TX022:9 89 



Centre Bytes 



Bay Tyne and Wear NE25 
9UW Tel: (O&l) 2533615. 



AMIGA 



Engage 
photon 
drive 2 

After contract, wrangles with 
Activision, Photon Paint 2 is at 
long last set to be released in 
the UK The original Photon 
Paint was a strong contender 
for best Amiga art utility. 
However, that title was firmly 
stolen by the spectacular 
Deluxe Paint IE. Now Photon 
Paint 2 is set to give that a run 
for its money. 

Unlike Electronic Arts' 
DPaint series. Photon Paint 
operates in HAM (Hold And 
Modify) mode allowing the 
Amiga's entire 4096 colour 
palette to be displayed on 
screen at once The new pack- 
age includes all the old fea- 
tures that made Photon Paint 
great such as extensive brush 
manipulation commands 

(including an impressive 
brush wrap) and freehand 
tools as well as several new 
ones, Like Deluxe Paint IE, 






Photon Paint 2s mam selling 
feature is a set of easy-to-use 
animation commands. 

However, if you're Amiga isn't 

equiped with a few megabytes 
of memory you're animations 
are going to be very short and 
simple. Look out for a full 
review in a future issue of 
TGM 

Microlllusions: Unit 4, 
Cromwell Business Centre, 
New Road, St Ives. 
Huntingdon, Cambs FE17 4BG. 
Tel: (0480) 496497. 



ATARI ST 



Arthur's 
listening 

Steinberg (creators of the pop- 
ular Pro24 sequencer) recently 
released Avalon (£200) a sam- 
ple editing package for 1Mb 
STs. Some of the options 
include^ conversion between 8 
and 16-bit samples, frequency 
domain editing, stereo from 
mono samples and the ability 
to work on eight samples at a 
time as well as the usual sam- 
ple edit options Evenlode 
Soundworks: The Studio, 
Church Street. Stonesfield, 
Oxford 0X7 2PS. Tel (099) 
3898484 



DISK DRIVES 



1 



Once in a lifetime 



In last month's Tooitoox we 
inadvertently printed the 
incorrect price for the MGT 
Lifetime disk drive. It is in 
fact £12996 and NOT £199 as 
stated. You will also need a 
cable to connect the drive to 
your computer. They come in 
various shapes and sizes: 
Spectrum, BBC and QL cables 
cost £10 each, while Amiga, 
PC and ST cost £18-50. 

And still on the subject of 
Miles Gordon and disks, MGT 
have just released a utility 
dish for all Spectrum +3 own- 
ers with MGT's 3 .5- inch 
Lifetime disK drive (or any 
double-sided, double-density 
80 track 3.5-inch drive). The 
DiscMate allows you to for- 
mat a disk to up to 706K (nor- 
mal format size of the built-in 
3- inch drive is 18QK), get m 
depth catalogues on screen or 
printer [detailing areas filled, 
and the file attributes), com- 
plex header manipulation 
routines (changing BASIC 
files to code headers, for 
example) and also a Boot 
function which allows a the 
user to reset the +3 from 



within a program. 

And don't forget the MGT 
Sam Coupe Hotline is still 
running. Updated weekly by 
the designer of the Sam 
Coupe, Bruce Gordon himself 
The Hotline Ansaphone num- 
ber is (0792) 791275. 

Miles Gordon Technology: 
Lakeside, Phoenix Way, 
Swansea SA7 9EH Tel (0792) 
791100 





m 




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just pack your computer. Including power supply, insurable 
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to the value of £35 00- yqu can also pay by aCCESS/BARCLAYCARD 




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■ • - i; w 

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Football Manage* £2 99 

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-run Midline £2 99 

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drfirt am 

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am 

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eui 

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ftpsi Mad mii 

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romerplij 

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Ryow 

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f-m ha. 

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loci.tr Sou (1.99 

vmef-er of Light £2» 

Solid Sold (Ciuntifl. Ac* ol Aon. 
LHiWtotrd, WmtE' Gdrr-tj 

mtflnfiltritof (499 

SofcsrorLord . £2 99 

5pwdkma [ I 99 

SpenaFlfingi (2.99 

5frj Hunter £2 99 

SferWiri „™, UJ9 

SErjrrn Wtfrigr EI.99 

5V«1 Cred ■ curbj I L'2 99 

5ife« Fighter E2.99 

Sum F-ater r £!.» 

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Bruce Lee vkI Beaeh Head 11 

£4» 

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I*rii ™ £! 99 

VHtfk - £2.99 

Tomtit £1.99 

toot Deforce . £»» 

Tremur^litandlCilu .. . . [J.99 

TvfiKEiprli 11 M 

Tu»f Font, £2 99 

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Vfrtpm Stnko Back £•■» 

■/Hi-, ol lhe £«ploding fnt .£1.99 
Wua.rdW.ri £2 99 

World damn ,„„ ___ £2.99 

YuArKungfii . .. £2.99 



9*3 

J* Pool 1999 

6f*Vn\l F4TA 

Aarah _ _ _.. (9.9h 

Arcade MusOe £11. » 

(*rUjri#iiJ £9.99 

Birry Mriiu>gafri _.. N'A 

BluTUfl , £S.9S 

Bittle island . ,. N.'A 

dug 4 Vol 3 IMA 

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Carrier Command £H-J9 

Oiuet Yeage' i .» 

Emlyn Hugiiei . .. £9.99 

Ferniidrjf Mull Die NJA 

Ems 4 Throllles f9.» 

foottall Direflor 2 [13-99 

FtwltMll Manager 2 (9 J) 

Fi»lbdll Wi-ngei 2 Esu £fi.99 

Furaotten Worlds £9 93 

Stt-H . (13 99 

6wuhip E9 99 

h.lMar N.'A 

Inlim-it. Team Sportt . h.'A 

jack NirtUu. HJK] M 

Kick Off HIA 

Lenterboard Collnlion £ 1 1 W 

Lee En(ield.Am«JDii . WA 

Lee EnfieM-TOurnilTienl NM 

Lieenoe to Kill £»9* 

M.tropnM* Soccer (999 

Mb'dernr lhe ALlanl-i NA 

Operaiion WoM (999 

rool of fladtance ■ ■• ■ l*'A 

rltalm.'Sfi-rjedOirt FfrA 

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Ren+ I*A 

Robotop (9*9 

Rodksfer (9 99 

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Supreme ChalF. Soccer ... £11.94 

Taskl h* 

Tert Oriw I (The QvrQ ■■ N>* 

Thmiderbirdi . £9.99 

nuinderioneiTiiink N'A 

iOKiil Artd £1199 

SinyV Spy Trilogy Fj.A 

Starglider2 £12 49 

SfedThur-Jer N/A 

Stew Cawn Smootk-f N* 



EIGHT BIT DISC 



AM^ » CP AMS 

£9.99 l<i.<K Sir™ HM N.'A £2 99 

£1.99 N.A SvdneyAffair „ N.A *H.'A £2.9* 

£*.» £4.9* (fltimj btroNJiifiAar M,A hd.'A £299 

£11, 9t [11.99 Xenon . . .. E9.99 £9 99 NVA 

£9.99 £3.99 Kor . .. N.'A E2 99 IWA 

N'A £2.99 WecLeM*n) £S 99 £999 [999 

£9.99 £9.99 XJ»i™i_lar N;A [2.99 M.A 

E2.99 Ni'A XTBObV E9.99 £9.99 £9.99 

£3.99 Wi'A 

£SW i|-"A Beit o1 Elite (Commando, 

*ja M.-A BombinJi. Airwol. t 

£9.99 £999 (rank Bruno) H/A 12 99 (..■* 

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N.'A £2.99 The Warlock, Slaine, 

£9.99 £999 Catch 2i i J-ulsitort £<99 hA NVA 

NM £13 99 S-dcarm> U.99 U 99 NVA 

E9.99 E999 War in Mid tad* . .. £9.99 £9 99 £9 99 

E699 £(.99 Game5et & Mlichl 0<2 £12.99 £12.99 f!2 99 

£9 99 £999 t <* Stir (iimH J (Trip 

£1399 £11.99 Door. U-rnf.um + . TauCefi 

I1J99 [Ii99 F'relord, Wly 01 the 

113 99 F..A Eiploding fist, ALens 

£9 99 hi* Strike tW Hameri UfA £499 KvA 

II I 99 N'A Edge OaiSn 1 IBobby 

E9.99 N/A Beai-ig, Irian BiooulaKe, 

[1199 {11.99 Qw t/adis. irVnrdry * 

NVA (2.99 Firrqun.1l .... N.'A 

NVA (2.99 Miriuder N.'A 

(919 [9 99 North Sljr M.A 

£11.99 £13.99 H>1etrjiu M.'A 

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(9 99 (9.99 Gunsi.nger ma 

£fS.99 N.A Hell! r t Altjck N.'A 

IWA (299 rtypenpt-eb. N.'A 

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N.A (2.99 Tr**irKt field . ,. NfA 

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(9.99 £9.99 M«ten ( the Lnvwn* N/A 

£9.99 £9.99 Supers!.. rS>,ng Pong N/A 

£8.99 M.'A Time Tunnel N/A 

£11.99 £11.99 Blood Brothm N/A 

[J..99 M/A Rim Ktfnner . .. N.'A 

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N/A 11 99 BreHfers . lir'A 

[1199 (1t.99 Bramntir ..... . [299 

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N/A N.A Red Led .. N.'A 

£11 99 WA FMlHtor VA 

E299 NM 



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SIXTEEN GIT SELLERS 



i-DPool 

Alrican Raiders 

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£<ite . 

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The Story 5o Far IBuggy Boy, Beyond [hi ke 
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, £13.94 (13.99 

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War in M-Ata Eirfh .. £13.99 £13.99 

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roo!b*:iMinagei!Eiii>aLit . ... [fl.99 £8 99 

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TV SpDrts Footbai -..„ t(.'A [199* 

Dungeon Muter ,„ El* 99' £1699 

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HaroeAofthfLjiite £16.99 (16.99 

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TTTTTyfcTtTT^^ 



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JkndBrettlfrt £199 

iirBathKB'vTm 

CKtttnao (i» 

Ms'wmir ( 1.9*9 

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lltoieriofthetfillry 

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Empire Stnkei B-lLh (J 99 

(nfJuraBA«r ... £2-99 

ifuMwKr Summer Girran 
iknpmvel* Viiipr.l f 3.49 
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FieVKk £1.99 

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footballer of tli*y»ir £2.94 

flip £<94 

frankenstein £l'W 

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Gauntlet lor 2 . .. . I!W 
Grind k*Mi*r Chest (1 99 
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hiirfighter El.99 

HanJfell £2 9» 

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HiQOuU £2.39 

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lr*hgt*F (0 99 

In^ntltX* Mi*ori 1199 
hum* Ruoby Sim £2.99 

Jack thi Nipper «99 

tftbnrik H W 

JrjeMadel or? .11.99 

fjfaBrrt2 ('» 

League fjallenge ■ B» 

Hindtup (1.91 

MM Offe* (2.99 

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fcetooiui £199 

f*th»leh<* .. n 99 

P»BiiM#dWii . 11-99 

Pfnatil ... [2.94 

Pmtm*n»it £199 

ftiwpiir I1.S1 

rWr Struggle (299 

iran« 2 Rwttall £1.99 

•»fn»«er £299 

Salt, Cum 5m £2 99 

Mmba £2.99 

Return Bfthe Je* ■■• £2.99 

RISK - £■» 

£299 
fl . £1 .99 

fantan £1.99 

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fcnT.r*, £1.99 

Skate tnzt EL99 

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fewer C £2.99 

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Jnlorhon'iter £1.99 

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Street Fijniter . £2.99 

Street sired FpathiH £2 99 
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Compendium .. £399 

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Tomtit (199 

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SPECTRUM CASSETTE 



fr« (299 

Trivial ^pwit 14 » 

Turba Elpfit .. (1-99 

Twin turbo vt . ... £2.99 
Wat D( Eiplading Fill £* 99 
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Wall Pitt: £2.99 

WorMGamn. £2.99 

*.I«mvnJInr .. . ft 93 

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ZMUltl £299 

2jn»* .. (199 

6aHM*rt« (2 99 

UJdertxuKl (2 99 

Aeuon Forrr (2 99 

»anM) ..- (o.» 

Alternative WEPld 

GirOeS (2.JS 

Burgenchaw .. £<J.44 

SUA Limp £1 99 

Bombuttl £2 99 

CUflM CIUHW4V ■■ ■■■■ £199 

Owto . _....I1.99 

CHemobjl £1 99 

CrwjKang .. £199 

Chain fseadion £1 99 

Cf&emoid .fIJi 

Defender a' lh*Cro*rn 11 33 
Deatmraiors . .. £1.99 

Druid 2 £1.99 

flunky £1 99 

Hither 2 £1 .99 

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mtmntim ■■- £'99 

10 . £199 

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M*Hf^d1th*Vil(rj £199 

ferthitir £1.99 

Pol* Ponton (1.99 

NtMi £199 

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SaaletraU* £1 99 

Slir Wirt £2 99 
Gary Lmeker fupenkitls £1 .99 

Sup*rq»rh £199 

tfmam Street Bark (1.99 

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(1,99 

SonrrtBictJGhmi iod 
CkWini (2.93 

Blicklamp (1.99 

CroHwsiie ■■ £1.99 

F*iTjndfll muU Di* .. £2.99 

Enlightenment 

1Druid2) E1JS 

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Miw*rpn £199 

QrKlrMan (199 

FJlWorm . £1.99 

Virritmwtf - (1.99 

RiddlrnDeh . (199 

Sigrnl? £1.99 

Sur&nmrkjrfrdalfin, 
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etej - £299 

ToyBilKni £1.99 

fajpanprinl (139 

Spectrum 4 (Junglt 
T«whle, nmer *ftaa 
SariM Din « Fit Warm) 

£1.99 

Ztnli £199 

lofth*M*vk ...£1.99 

frhirrtomOuh £T99 

Babble Babble .. £199 

EirthJight [1-94 

Flying Shirk 11,99 

Intern? £i 39 

MyiteryQ* the Nike [1,99 
BubMer . £1.99 



Xarl ... . £1.99 

JynnH .. £1.99 

rfsnirtoi (1,93 

JK - £199 

19Boot€»mp ■ £199 

19*2 .. £2.99 

720" £239 

AudKny (299 

Anc 1 ai 2 £2 99 

Anion Foree (2.99 

Advin<wl5a<e«f9ini (3.99 
Mien Sjndrame £2.99 

Arner.i*n (aoiWi £2» 
Arcade Flighl Sim . £2 93 
Arrhpn Cnllen«n £2 93 

Army MOWS .. £2 99 

BKktottool £1-99 

tL»rbiriin2 WW 

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Birr* bktiuijjin'iBdiirlfl 

Ultkecin . (2.99 

BIlh Thunder £199 

BHXSimlor2 ..£2.99 

BombJKkicr? 1199 

Chime Chmtin £193 

Chubby Gentle £2 99 

Chuci*£gg2 £199 

£j5fll*ctS*mCra« ....11.99 

CndcetW £199 

Cup Football . (2 99 

Cfhernold , .. £2.99 

Diley Thompwn^Detiithlon 

Deep- 

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Dim C199 

OiiirDice . £139 

TheDauHe £2-99 

DjeamNfVirrior £1.49 

Empire Strike* H«J( . (2 99 
Endura Rlter £2.99 

Endianc eTI.SS 

E ufopein 2 FDDtbaJI .. £2 93 
(wer^Setun* Counts £2 93 

Emterer f ' 99 

Fnrl4h1 UK 2 . £1.94 

ftftFwd "39 

Tint pil lh* Post . (1.99 
Foaibill Mm*9*r .. . (2.94 
rBOB>i||eroFlriey*ir 

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Foil Fighti Bi'> . ... £2.99 
Frmi.aruim £1.99 

Fruit MKhintfim £2.99 
FulUfHtnirjht .... £2 9» 

GimeQvM , 12.99 

Gan.rJd £2 99 

Gr*lvim fiwch f 1.99 

dhotlbwiiTi (1,99 

G«fnflHlDf2 (2 99 

GtlndFrilSitlilorJUH 

tireefiBe^ (2-49 

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Hirdtl*B .. £2 99 

HietvypnifiePiMgidt ,, £1.99 
HiQChi^J CtH 

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ltd, the hippe* £2 99 

MS»tWiir r [139 

, - .V lion's Dim (2.99 

Jo*Blad*1pr2 £1.99 

KiylElh . ,.._ -,£1.99 

KitaniJ (1.99 

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£*id('bciira .. £2.99 

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MinK M-rver .. £2 95 

Mtrten oMhe 1Jni**f!* 

1f.«mf (1.99 

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Huj29 — .... «-»9 

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EIGHT 8IT SELLERS 



M r.CjM.ce £191 

Monte Carlo Cu»«t £2.99 
MaanCrHtB (194 

MaloCrostiiim £2.99 

Netrtjlus £1.99 

Nflhrmttrid £199 

NiniiCofwmntlo ., .. £2 99 
Oniheften* £299 

peps. MkJ Mil £1-99 

PelerShilian ... [2 99 

PmbaliS.IB . [?99 

Powerboal im .. . £2.99 

ftjwerplej £199 

Pos'minPel f 1 39 

Premier J Fuotbilt (1-99 

Pr-0(JDl(lor2 £1.99 

Pnj Snooker £2.99 

RimlM .. . £2.99 

Rettelsliri ...£1.99 

netumotlhertdl £2.99 

He* £1.93 

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Balleramler , .. ft 99 
*ugp>Bop ■■ £194 

Bggb'i Sim £2.99 

Dyoir (1,39 

Slbolen* 1 or 2 (1 99 

koobyDotr .(1.49 
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SideArriii £1.99 

Suiieiflosi ,.£1.99 

Soccerfl £199 

SocwrStir £299 

Soldier ef Light £2.99 

Solofnon') i(ey .... 11.94 

Vjptmtry It, 9* 

'tpitr Shuttle . (939 

Speedkma2 . (199 

Sport of Kings £2.49 

SpyhUinier (2.49 

Stop the E...jx«! . (199 
Street Crett easing (2.99 
StreeKred Faatbill . £1.99 
Street Sparto BllLu-u-nH £2.99 
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Supe'cCyile £2 99 

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Tna*t il 99 

Tiroet fienerjide . £i.99 

t«CForwT. (2.49 

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Tempeil (199 

Tttril £2-99 

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fr B pdoortor2 £1.99 

Iru [Z 99 

TrbtsurelslinilDiiry £2.99 

Turbo Esprii (1.94 

Twin Turbo YB (1.99 

Wiyal the EjuAxtnij Frit 

£1.99 

Wiy ot *e Tiger (2.99 

Ai;irdWlU ,£1.f9 

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World Oust* id* rboird 

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* Pick Vol J (Eaglet Nert. 
Sir.y Ace, tn1 Siritii 

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Cipl#in Amonei (1.99 

Fit Warm ... (1 99 

He»tf ire Attn* II 99 

HKH £1.99 

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Flunk, £' HH 

Mermj.syjdneti . (194 
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BMRSirn 1 or? 

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Bruce In* _^^^_„ 

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PSi Wirrior 

PtythotoMier ....-™.„. 

RinAtemi 

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ActtJm 5T^99 

ACUOH iervirJi 5T or Amia» 4 99 
AHerijumAt »1 HI 

Aheffnie FUAtiity (The CityftT 9 49 
AnniksofBoene AmigA 9.99 

EUIjil-p a1 Paw*t ST'AnMl 9.99 
flirbimn ET Uf 

Cipta-K(lood Amijfl 9.91 

Dngrjni trtlir 1 Meg Amiga. 19.99 
El T,ini1or Amtaj 4.99 

Empiie Strikes BKk Amigi 493 



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ST 499 

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HMMUH 

Bjrbirsin2 
Mytterj on the N^e 

Eirthliijhl 

Crpffww* 
Filing Shift 
fl-nctLamp 

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*# £S50-t-t;5UHl(M£CHAUiNrjE #*«« * + 

WfatlUMtCrMMflDORE AM5TFLAD CASSETTE 

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-A************************* 

**■ £4.44 # A- Tifl Computet HHJ Vol V * * £*.» +* 

Da 'I 5<*ptre, Meg» Apacaljrn*. Tr«i, Nin|i Himsler. 

FriOHtmire Tinin, MaWWtron.MyjteryohlheMllt^Cltth 

fliDmidi 

A* SHCTItlJMOtelV ## 

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Brimlirr Llfl*|in|i Stryie 

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Cybematicn Mistersofthe TripOoor 

Vdeirmi LHw*n* Flun*) 

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Shacsled ftattl* Islanf LeeEM.eid 

949 4.99 4.91 



SOFTWARE CITY ORDER FORM 

PLEASE SEND ME THE FOLLOWING ITEMS 




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NAME., - -.-. 

I ADDRESS ».." - 

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I All ord*rt >*ni f Irstl r.la« within, 34 hours ol nctrini. iuh|BCt to iv»labil.iy. 

I Maker chniuefPCl! peyaWnw igftware City. 

Please acW $Q p (o,r posl a nd pack igLng an all of den under ( S.CHX oy e rwn Qt$tn add ( l . M p*r n*m 
ArtMtesilo SOFTWAHt CITY, 3 LICHFIELD PASSAGE, WOIUERHAMPTON WV1 1D2 

PFn,r*,,r»ieiii irivin ift r*ri.i«p fhp ahrrife rj.wniinn. 1£>% o,f HflP on arty »tl¥"r. not l«te>d 




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Look Hag War lama* Ai_-n*«*yauf annljy "* 
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awiun AB4 iflj iMMCDiATE nPPI t 

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hon ol u*"rp* *nd Ib*chrner*a ^w criBi-i> 
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mend ST «ethori Wrap 1d - Aobn Cimun. 
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FOR SALE 

9*9* l)«a«ii 1« m**ig*j«iio LflM PNnWf 
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awmt flcknirig Snmot. ard Quid* Dwan 
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gam Tn LP'S '' J' ' 5 aha 1 6pm 



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bo.i and pyat^ii Qanw nc r*ii^r]ar Biada. 
lUirt* in. Spaca Harnaf Shrtor^. Aflif 
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Mark fU>-aitfi 78 IW* attar 6pm ptaaaa 



Saga iratam *ntn two luyVKH. CKlfUhol 
and contnJl *irfli ana t*a joypafli o^m 
i)mw Wtertjumof. fl-T»pr. Qui Rial, 1>H»t 
Par Blada, Many f>' . Kixg Fu Km SMrots and 
Bj«ay rUoangd t'Ji To" 02K81»li! 

Mart SW aTTFM arxaHant [rjmdirjn luiy 
hniad witri taiana nev 1 rTrao^inma Pmia 
icctatiSi i»jk Mi., J mouaa niati. loyHrt. 
tiisndar aado. 2 .o>il>£>"=. many tlWniaf 
inciudmo &%ntto. 4*0* Of g*™ 1 t«*oon. 
FhV# ifl34+} Tf 9S7U 

VnHf»S00 Ba^adandinbnraarrlcDrloiW^ 1 
•Mtttii mouao Hjlo* Se*«r*n* complaM 
wonrti Et2« ncludmg Daliiaa Pairt 1 and 2. 
Friotor. Pant. Arn 4or PataHl MDdvitia 5 
aacaup u1« . CU maw, Qur™ aaka <*C 
anajralg' and oada mora Wn^rla- lot w4<lti 
appmii Ci900 OarOa" and a Hi«l to/ Ei3C 
ana Ftiriii lOfi". JM !HM ^ asli tc Mam 

Arnalrad C*C *M. S"*" mona, irHduaflCT. 
ILIHIIH a«t ISO swnM «B Fwonnw 
Wortra. DrBoiai hanjt wn Ich mora. So* ita 
[300 U sir.dliiHit conS'on Ptaia* 0htm« 
PaU on (01 ' .. 1J* 6*6 1 laflar 6pmi 

ifWrtnan - 3 **■ Lapr ^econW «•» ftfs 
ark, maruw magjarjna* and gamai on bdlh 

rM» and lafra ^iiMC«tlan!oaodr|>cn.*iTf17n 
Tot Smtol BXHZl arm 3.30rm 

Saga iiraaifln D gar™, ip* hna unn. joifl- 
tick, ganai inciuoa Qdutllt (K*odh, *motii, 
S|atC« H>»rr» Pro Wnaanng. Erduro E tadar 
and H>ang On [ISO e«0 F*ona (QTgii 

MM 

Alan JXaTTTM ana mag ntamal drrva. 

rrvuaa, pTpiticH onl> nm month* cad UBb 
aortwant, maot Irckp*^! BTlCtS^ f>»obt. 



Th«iiri# Blada. Alt mnt candHior. Onh/ 
pnn P^ona Gr^ wart. ll»W!. fl»H1 » a*an 
>nVwMt<*n« 



Jit 5&4?Sfi. 



pn CatsMg, m uftdar CS 
0*m*t *w*iflH >rrSC U Mana, »»c-*H) 
fcobornp. Anaada< tAiac*. Eau* many mrjia 
5<m) SAE ft" t«t lei Suntv, Clwi, M Edward 
Ejarman Dnw WnXr^Lrcn Sirucigiwa 9VI3 
1TL VBr\gcm30nHf 



100- garnet mt Cma SoUnnnna Hay. 
tWyond Tua loa PaaaPa «rJ Ujfiaf B*5tf- 
«W11i £800' "W Saiing lor £S« omi 
Phon* _a>tt on 2977 alOOMathy flpn- 

Sa4bc«hi QP100A <□" pnrtar £".99. 
ZXLpnrt HianOloadtUW Inwrormer «Ttor- 
**cb SS.99- Kamnaton iraanaca tj.*, 
EW'Ticaac* lounda^rtri Cl 1 * Snnv" 
Braman intorniiton aona 3*E C4«KrC>rj 
SriBw. ?5 RadMppd Avanua, Royaton, 
Samaary %. Yonii S71 «JP 

l|jlii:lnaTi fjimii Morth o>ar C"3(!0. aoN lr? 
T I DO ona. Inouooo Laal l»fia 3. H*n*nae)t 3. 
mdal*.T» Tal DW4 E5?rE3£aRarrS jbprn 



HlUJiuan-j, Mulnraca 1 jj. Trma» pnnin I 
oapar royMn* 'Juar M00 Crt pjma* III* t'5 
ol maoarin«a ufonn ovar E9W Any orloi*^ 
Phm Tony on IDllSlS JS05 

jypHnH CPC+W oatcu -mnliT JS lop 
Iidh, Ojtctanr" * tavat'C* Only S momni rtd 
hcrtoa. H n*w SiMiacond^ar Wjr|r.t3S0. 
Mraafi al QK. SaTnwe ritmcan Chit Hun 
Gnaati BWrt gnd Oanntlol Piona Ruolp F»e 
7HQ3 a^anjrgioniv Speai. |rj Or^ti 

Mm S200TTM «(IH dob rnofjaBVIti dnvf, 
hue rnouie nwl. duii CCnW. rcryalc. man- 
l* * 5T rnagajnai, 31 gamai iiKtudingi 
CtparalionlfVoirrSIl 1 . Mathflua - wordprocaa- 
•fr. Bp#" Cn*t^. graphci pacuon Ersoaftoni 
CondHlon a/COmm* Son*y Of «*♦ 71 RT 



niflK ff#i »«. nrinHr. mouaa. 
<iyfii-^, badu gam«. oooks. maga. CaaHa. 
gnpnci, PLOinrMa aOHnaf*. PWrH fna 
■nrjbr afT AH lor r*DG one Phono Mark on "111 
BM agio a^oniioi 

Amairad GPC <1 a ortv mcnurpi MI l B i 
He*, Curvu wran Pro fit,v&. E3aa cf ang> 
ri#a na w«ra. matrrj rM. Pnonr Dard b"* 
Ipn>mg>9iVlri < iaD 



„ loyabct. Ivro padt. nriaar 
gomas. ripKl I'ciyvi Oarnaa frckida ft-Type 
Rair^H? III. PrianrarETy Star. Aflan^jmai IMCrrth 
Mba, omy £200 BarP*yi Ring Itvn Prjrptier 
atlar Spm V-. 0BM*9*H9 Aakloi PaJ Cin. 
iKi 3B Oak Bar*.. Maw A**"al0n, Ooydon 

SUrKlinim ' 2B i boHBd with manuanl idpe 
•aoorder. caaa L-r gwimt iiM*rllc* VBf> good 
oonorltori E^O fi^i.i CchiIiKI JareTTV Grab* an 
4037101 SGa;9CI Ltont delay, crone lodlV 



lore* *aai of ad Dog Arrva gyw 
nchm™ Mi,1n.s. C*- Wtdl. CMum, PBCrnani 
Btc irrcrin [■ 100 villi j*tt tor EMct dth 
Phon* Ant m Cl r«3 32 '6 nler S0<n l(r Hit 
All bcuad crigmlra 

C«4 taaa oarrwi it> aara Pnc«a a> lo« Mp 

Gam&e Miiituda Wrjriri Gamaa, Rampage ***je 
2aW. SaratSAC tor Hal In Manau*. SAfjLKa 
I. Walariwv. L.narpool U2 eQU 



CAM «4. C2N. jflrtiick. I? gamaa noUrarq 
ChrtShiD, FJtaaMi Polrtev Pjim&o Ml. E'C'takm , 
Qaod DDndrUoTi. ESa« lor ttpp fal (DfcjSl 
*53l3 Aa* Idh Smon a.aopTn m S.Mpm 

For aa»a 36M &+ wt* dalaaatta. jaystioh. 
Baca: up carirogp. £900 o" gan<44 rn.liid.rM 
Spaodbali. D*Ao>iS. Wprtti £*». sail In EtrSfl 
imc. Fi« Aim 761X1 if oojgfn bofart A,,trjsi 
tat PnoriodMSOl6«4J7ir»fHloiii. 

ZX Spactnam vm - . Aflijl J anrjmouaa, loyi- 
Hrk ana mv [TOO al gamaa nc Ftarjoccn. 
Karnov. Ekle Arbaurrie Harger. Batrta BUf 
and Out flar ONy i2Sr8 or *wac tor ET or 
Amga Pnom Bob on |3i f1 1 68071 tjrt wmr. 
4pm and 6pm 



j(0O»t itk mail RDK< irsm rtOTon- 
Japan Auna on MSK2 SCO ar<d MM {Hitp 
■He TicorporalBO. Brat-d "a* and unopanad" 
- Q» Phona Maltha* on |DB(3| SCOBS* 

A*ri IT aarna* (oro^iala) Ifoyagar CiO. 
Wanlad", Indiana Jones I in* Trjmpla ol 
Ooom. CS aaen IrnpOattJs Msiion II ES. San- 
lr"al E7. Cantar Command tl 0. Siijnl S*V<« 
tin, Epni Gieateal Cieir** Compilation E I ft 
JIMftrT 



Tbi OH 



J6DJB 



Atwi S T *»)> a*™i» I" Wat, half 11-* onginaJ 

?nc« Of Hap. For inrbrmafeon braoB* nnrj 0Tf3 
mm 

CB4. HpooK'.nvllrCii f200 irvsrihi nf rjjmrM 
Mhictha Fmryn HiajIih, Mcid Soccet. 
H K.M., Rococco rjw £f 5 <* rwrjt, Hwda al 
POKEa {130 IrVrnn fa EWa AnKan. t 
OH/mar* Fload. Ilrougrilcfi. * CranKa* CH4 
OflN rx Tat. W*a EKHJ49 A rMrgaiiir 

C1PD1 monattK ^i ut» with ct>* and piJE 
c^mpuern^ Al$:^ iHRd Id conr*d Armga lo 
CIMI monror armoufh only *n**n CiXHrra 
onpHyed erfl •Traan fSQ - P^rar cohacti oi 
□eyi OCflaga Phono (CMSSl 81t3i7 angi 
elpm. 

Saga tor aale vnth Uorrt PntMir, pijahek and 
11 gamaa. ireuomg KtKillldan, Stunop! and 
Afoprbunwy All in aood condnlon Ekaaad 
Worth EJtt. <m anilo- 1150 *X. T*l H70S| 
S8i73a«lt*f *pm Ovck aaH plaaaa 

Alan STMrV r*axirai«lflK!fi.BBllbriiad. E4M 
* -ill . i! lolrttran '!'■ Paagpr "jtH>sr. Hi 
Worth E?Su. aa) im t2'0 Qu& Hh bqp 

orlw'ijlfrjr Hn.h*i1<«!rp WlTatD *SCu<- 

[•nliLano. hlanmch EaaoiCOif 3DC 

**+»» M«. plvi 51 ?K FtAM, 1 DBAS omou- 
■nonilor Tinilii Gaann Ptafih. ran tjl pnet 
gomoa u* EMfirwJ Monrt,. fjparaccn *prj 
ftniy a mantra od. MoO ono f^ono P«* Unn 
on Kalhanng WS3*1 520»?i anylima 

BSC B h¥Tlh Aalt dr-re ano 34*4411 PF=1 an 
Ivrt m*a (M t™ r?30O tape racordar and 
gamaa CW, two mag >2« only f 50 Phana 01 



16B rata km) LomJori atta only fj " Plant 
oorrdrlllTi 



£8M a*s. C2N d«i4**ii* Itan Jgytncas, 
nieuH. ov* rrfJOgamaa and loarJa at mm Aji 
n ■■canara condHtrn or*, [ISO oao Phorp 
KMCJl ZP-P915 

Alan Uvl STfat momrj. ? -lyinosi .ncjuOmg 
a,n'.li»hnl II i urbo. S 1 61 oi aotrn-ara T«warvg 
Fatcor. Vmj». NflaVad**. CVngajon Maalar 
D ai tM ray U BCI $i«ar Harg-O. IrVEC U 
Mam many magai"e» E'rWrhing bnaad 
afM " i|a™Bl4a*|i wndaioiv Sen & EiM 
Phort* SoutJi Walai |MU0j. A207J7 

■aK l«PU!" dnvl, OFS rrouaa datacor 
dar royal**:, aaaanil 2it KK«t Watlord 
apeoch ajnin WaitOtOraOMa tort ol aoftwari 
on b*na and drak. an boohs and laana. CSOG 
one PhorairaTJTjaaalja 

CB4 gamaa. AJI ongina' P"cr lu. lama gamp* 
onrjrnafc f2S 00 MtMSrtMV pnes 1cr njana 
T* 0Q Tittaainc^otUBin-alV.Slaain'iF^rrrari 
•4anagadc SAE 10 Phrnp Hapatona 19 
Snrtua^riam Fapod, Stamdon was. Chax and 
Tape 

Load* ml CranmorJor* M raarnaa on dnk mm 
tana Al cheap Send SAf lo W Hun. 71 Nut 
iiory !>•*» Tnattcrd Nodoft; TP5* 3£P Ehi 
O.K-X- Aa gprnai tor aale art orrwaaj, Qamai 
mctudo Were SOCCPf . F*-n Tha Eaiarllat ptu 
^vHiaifompilaliorri 

Marl HO QFmi rayitick, only a. montna oka 
OwrtlOrjOn-Hll 1 at mj^Wlp* *Kkjrtmg marl) 
new lrlkjB vVii ancapt V*OG Call JaremY on 
0779 4.1773*. 

H** JgiblH ajaanaa. r^aottarn fVoKd*. EirH. 
CH> V»oH Spki Hamor. Banaf* Al ram E13 
each &£b5 9m rcif ^hon* Matthew on iCrftin. 
76»au attar 5 Sfjpm Hurrr' 

am*ga arlginaaa. Coamc J>«-alrrj Capla* 
Stood Staralidv II Oa«ai*P n rn, Bprdi Tafet 
M w aiti Pt . 9iado%gplB tnnrtv S4aaria*,ai 
loan Ojoof. V^njo f»*ty Tap Mrndtoritai 
Ajcarnina Raolny. Sraapcfaakp' C'OQ AkTie 
076 6B. r MP Horrfi Wale* 



__ El8 BBC*. 35»i l - 
ftDcky Outrun AJiarOumar. Qraal CloK 
aTviuCH 111 goipo and p* now Aj*rjRoc*<|FBr 
und boisd. C* Phona D*S3 2M37 

■foa ayakam. Etgra top arcade rj*™» J 
rlyiliclia. maoai"**. *l good condition 
i tkaC h tna m lyrralfTl condition and parfKI 
wonsno ordar Wrjrtn im [200. *J laH tar 
£l» Phone 0W3 715fan and *Jk «or Jort 
V(H„.|.,.. 

$*g« i:=n»iil* pijl tWl Wi, *.-. i ,i- i tj .".. .! 

Fajn. bouoki Oaoon. tVmw Boy tQ. Aleu 
Kid AjClkm Fianiar ttang Crn and Aatnrj Wa>- 
npr Worth £2*0 wJaeuVdW Tal 0190' 
l.^1 | a ..<: f ?.-rr 

Atari B^ntTPM. in-n dpk orhp EkcaHanl 
oonraTtJorn RHca packago mrarth t^i'.i .• - 
garnaa worm E3«S oorvain Ftr/n Forgodan 
(Vcriiis fltfaXO AH rwrrh £770, art aar QH 
arm Pronp Nc* Bn Yo* 7*57161 

COM 121 twa lape dacka.. £2» d> xjn»«« 
io,rjiF magyi Oamaa include Batman. O- 
Ty» *ll ongtnUt Wont L"aH' . wal t*a <ur 

ri7Donil phona01M0?7flBQ.*alBarDpn'i 
Murr, *nrj pick up thai phona"" Any hrha. aak 
lor Fafut 

Amiuad *a* graan acinen ihM* OvpuIi 
Maci : |oy*tK(i. [ISO worrh game* mduckna 
Oafpa mn J and Qparapcm Wotl 3 mrjfaf«okr. 
tcrCIBa.aaryainqLreii aa*ji1a : il »i i Phon* 
Mm PM1B on «7 W1 7 '3 S3* «H*r *pm 

Alan ST with aotlwafl ■"* MlaBrHun- 2.1 1 SO 
PoM sfii* 01 oman. Aa new (200 00. buy* 

cdacli. H? Darwenl SmHK. ChopppH Na* 
!uao|lT l mt1«1i7rHt 



_„. al> manBtif old, bhcbHbp< ecu- 
oinan, Inrtidaf lavan gprnai incAinnQ Rocky. 
Wonoarocry and IS. arrKt on m gwn cotta 
CM. two CofllhJl pad* WorBi £225. aok lo- 
ft ?S T* IC3.*SI U803PO aPia *u* 

•paccy rpfaaai Many Mlr*» pyaficka. popu- 
lar gamaa WP ajKa. Cffln*>2 Anna on lllrif 
559H»*«a'»m 

Crjfiamaakara tU aim 30 oarnaa and 
magazine* [^00 No oftan Phone 0702 
MjTDO. 

Amatrad CPC IH2B buft-m onp ditva. CS00 
at Aaka, 



gamaa. (rrratprj*. a rfiOmha (ad wJOnfrl TJ9QIQ. 
aJI a*g Icy r3S0 Tal IDMti 37HS*Bwv«en 
apm and Spm waakdaya only 

CflB Cola e BVapoti Damaa and aamaa Btcaa- 
aoraH M*rt candae*. bevao. swr 30 anta 
i mi rrcm Alan Chapman OS Uma Ortara. 
Ijooonr/hirr: £»Sb. G"t*. DO* Tat «71 
BKTgsT 

■*(• tataa* a" oa»iia m imi congmpn Hiarr, 
D OCaach LiitiYrjmajar.ihppman.illjra 
Ojrovi. f>dA-W f i EkK< CMt* OQSf Ta> 
D777 tSl TWi petora a Bon 

Anwg* ABOa piu* mamory aapanaioiv HaM. 
monaor, over At] garnaa. ncAaand fjpamt 2/3. 
SCUBt JD. WBH O P C aB* 31? with Arpnabsn 
waa t7HDd mcJudna aofraan andnardwara 
wti aatHerttlOOorm, T* M*rr4y WWW 
714BJ1. aaklof Karl 

Atari *20 BTFal bpiad II momra rpd ■ 
MOD pi adman, m onona" < SO PD dbUi - 
Camp Pro jAytKk T*»Tb( sfay 5300 Ta> P au 
01 314 358B attar Bjot. 



_. gtx:*"* hi •■■: ■ : v w .- 

MiaDtarp 1 apaacti ayrHh rffrahek. paarry 
Opmat on rapat and iMtt irify gpfidjon*. 
von InrpjdP cprnputw daak Qrr- CTTjO to 1 
qkfdk baroar ibh, aiaaan an «•» 19rli S 
•vara narwig IWunl apar eaan g l n i i l 



Cap «nth i s*i oak dry. 1 101 c 
hag CMa rHWll l hap iOy*i>cu pvar 7C0 
oak md caaaafl* CB0O (no 
if* gpm T*i 09-71 H31U 



PENPALS 



C inai i adi r i M ■*•* wtahai « lajap mi 
ale I hava <t» nawaaf dufi an dapp Sand 
compiala I4H.1D Jaaon Lpntaaiar. l7CPl*nt 
9nal fPkiiBtjaiig HpgKu mat Vetera 



6t conuarh) nramad Hrla to fJaraVi Uvai. 
a Olanm* Crtae*™ laawporl OPprH NFS 



HJM! Akan IT* kamn art Caanracli waned n 

tha UK and around me wohd lo awap *m B. 
npaatc &ai«aciAlaiion«)BI nP7333arwma 
1o 9B Granga Road oomora rxrham, Eng- 
wnd DH1 1 ACl Coowri un »m«] Onlan 
fappaSaga 

Jkjaikap aaaaapaa W*rpBd rnvna) |ha pond rjai 

raah aau fcntaan" nyrt* 1o Up 1 Ek j a i i a iaiw 

Road, 9a He4aAi. AyO*- nAt of T«oM POD 

iland hk lo Mark and JuBarff 

■tfjr i at 3 ppp pall wnh app dnvaa auniad 
Bi c*ar Bhi wond *ava MSH7 hantwara 
p anic IP»*jClt son*dpi*f) Wnrp ifl 
Fplar Jau » Lpgacurry Ftaad BariBmaf. Li- 
Bum. & Antnm"kjT?7 S3.. N I . CK 100*1) 
rapty our qnty &m uapra 

BT compl-ib aanlBd Itam al oiw th# wond. 
M latBBt atulT iuih rapt, *tu lo Da*a. 1 1* 
taoVraan L>n« P-aK-fll, fngkano 

Annkja canUKIa awnwj WmaiDOal.iOvt- 
DOutpugri Drw* New tor* North Shaada 
WL»o«T lOtnuapiy NoE 



would iPib pen par* horn pi mar 
Thai wold Hasty g u a fi i ani d if nt*rHi*d 
ant* m jafl Cook al naatbur. si. Laanar- 
aykr BraofDTdBuPtPfl <>tiCrPr,Vr<K<i> 
wt W^n* kukrtat. 

P l i ACa* Kk 1 OWy B we. wnMrl yOn ij> >8 yQuf 
daal panrpv just Band £2 to the adrJraaa 

oalpw A pflrPjai rfl aaaurad P*tf* tri PROS 
nnpae 1 HpBK Qgap, Nevbi Woortcn 

K.inrj. a Lynn iKirtop lt30 JfHJ 

r wanti par pan round n< 

fipB. paoflfwnivajl Hfi 

ri J*D_Fprjan 



mora™ Want corpactaika tam Sanooamrja. 
ax*, oapat CK aiyimna Al aptara anawarad 
Wnaa 1o Ignacc iirulmi k»aooncna 2*A. 
20007 San aacklaaarl. ipa<> La 
HVW) i rj ap*aiTi r air to man, up" 



(T pepiiacia, wanted IP aaap nm« hp> and 



chaata 100*. lanty P i m a, c ki ia a < 
Jaaon Bradwal tit Cmatry Head Oranabv. 



5Ufi ma iMi ai Mu a DH33 H.V • *»» ,1^1 

4>W «*«V Waul P" Pala l» "wap *»fflt. 
IdKu * KH»p*y QUBra-IIVM HHtlf?f*l 
BPiopiarPH. flayiiflli.FwaJ-SSBBSl- Ptama 
■tMl 

n0i4 Is awap *nrr*a« and anywma (Iff *» 
if* Aitoi 5s*s Iti no Marti Hun is rtriod 
Om Ooidan Cflc y=.H r»ji r«my guvrvi- 



Amgi contacla wanMd *om m 0** Bat 
<raorj. rut rjpp, uwiiid i DQ"*i YHHa <a 
Z<*. 100 Wa*H* a, BUCtiurn. U«e» an I 
EMU. LK 

Anuoa conlacti, - Hut <*prr aesmd Serb 

t»M pfl htn BO Th* 5*jrvwaliBl, 4 Cuu^jlu" 
Ar§. IWUlt, HaaitiO Bir«s BiB ] 

Ouhv. BoKM*. & liuhr and Darlh Van* 1 

Nfr« u**T QKH41 naaBl COdsn IP lt#p *** 




100% 
■ ounrYHtd Wrrt* Hi Mark Wcho*. IB 
CM * IB lir a. CbUkiiiIMI DuAoaWW. On 



■ Contacta pi II* UK * U5*( 

> WriamanQMr I^Cavwpjr«pi! 

I Longer- H ft l 1 .. LUnl » «B tm r - la 



USER CROUPS 

■uoac Domain mlhnrt foi iW *lin ST 
Leads* *a»i wm m#r^ hip btt«i- Pnoal iranv 
rt*l«I5p*»»"nia™wTrti« Sana 5AE 
lar bolkgwG Plf MwHn,&C«i* 
CoHana.. HtngHD tMhr T^aW. UC 
gum: S-autn «**»(?« 1P5 



Alan P*joi»c r»r-wi -r- Snu^i, yoa 

^Dir: on- r T^p *JK" CraCOUflLcommttii:**' 1 

tehaari' No irwpbar raw Ft* fr«* catalogue 
vc M 5AE ro Farads* Compularv 4 
■Harllld. Cm. &ToNon. EMI SuM*. 6H1 
W HOW 



FANZINES 



GokmjIi snn*fi leetmo kX aomatrana. new 
* ihj, 4 pew «ir*acr CONSOLE (3WZV. a 1arv 
j» it* cvikM own* j * memmt,- maoai™ 
itvlng km.*" Frrf dauaaj *rrla td C C , *S 
(jtapi V"n» *aaffiara»DnB. WHt Vortuhn 



MISCELLANEOUS 

hW» aaar iwi HoiAJmjl' Of auH you 
an). But •* vCMj haha la leas n 0ia arc* ©1 4 

£!&*£ To find nul rfiyr? ■*!!» la GaDJTJfl 

iUU_>t*i 54 Walarmn Bom Frovturon 
iiri&ar f*J WjTOOrW 



Pro Pf*> Bflocar Laagua Fu*» f.Ompv'"' 
modtraiad, tncljon l_M4t<4 V^i t* nwraa 
Irtmrulicrnit. rtftnwt ban md B****t 
51*- .:i n.-n-HJ UaMDuan itljgpai 

tortraghl Wpta 10 0m™h»1» Gin™, it 
AkJUfl Way, L>irg*iMD Morwcn Mill Wl* 

tHXCfC* UA5TEH lha cnnTiHrtH aoajmn 
tormiClnilcDama inouO»**H»»nni«M 
M irM&ucllm*. KMU Mi ir<l much mar* 
SBTdWOOiDPaul. IBCli»tlBn-*pO CaPWV. 
Etate 6and Ci Uliim laf GhaU **aj 



Fmilltlc. «»*ul. «'CKin«. 
addci'W. c^TifAHTr-ti»wa ham Facing 
HJM OFTnng. baltng en WHi F*»1 
iiuriM'OLna CasnondlrStmy pin* tlHaJl- 
jf- C ■ 40 pw Hii»i MJ timtHfd Pijrtrt h«*i 
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Send to THE GAMES MACHINE READER CLASSIFIED, P0 Bt>K 10, 

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READERPAGE 



1 have watched with disgust as slowly but 
surely your mag has turned into another 
computer magazine that is geared towards 
the fantasies of naive schoolboys' 

...writes Samantha Brydon from Nottingham. 
This month she gives her view on the cur- 
rent spate of sexist games and attitudes in 
the computer industry, and wins herself this 
month's £50 worth of software 




"LETTER 





Living in a fantasy 



DearTGM 

1 am a female reader (yes you 
do actually have these!} and 
have watched with disgust 
as slowly but surely your 
mag has turned into another 
computer magazine that is 
geared towards the fantasies 
of naive schoolboys. 

No, 1 am not a raving femi- 
nist and yes 1 have a brain 
and own a computer. Indeed, 
I was upset over the censor- 
ing of Angel of Death's pack- 
aging because it was a good 
drawing. However, I did not 
expect you to then go on to 
list other censored covers or 
hear about the offending nip- 
ple' (yet again) in Game Over. 
Clearly this is all geared to 
the majority of male readers. 

Yes, I do realise that the 
majority of readers are male, 
vet this is hardly a surprise 
when one looks at the stereo- 
typing within computer 
games. Of course, this is not 
your fault but then you go on 
to print as a star letter 
Dominic Andoh Jnr's com- 
ments on harmless fun, com- 
plete with a picture of a 
woman in bra and knickers. 



What this boy doesn't seem 
to realise is that the games he 
quoted — Hollywood Poker 
Pro, Leather Goddesses (1 
mean!) etc — just verify the 
argument that there are 
enough of these scenes 
around without you making 
comments such as 'and what 
afoxtress she was, smurp 1 '. 

I find your argument that 
Vixen wasn't exploitative 
ridiculous, She was the hero- 
ine, but basically it was just 
another stereotype of the D- 
cup blonde. Luckily for me I 
have a boyfriend, who after 
playing Strip Poker once (we 
both did) commented that it 
seemed unfair that whilst 
male tastes are catered for 
female tastes are not. In 
future I wiH not be buying 
your magazine until you have 
anything decent or worth- 
while to say, 

I realise that this is not the 
first letter you have received 
in this line, yet perhaps if you 
and the computer industry 
catered for more than the 
male audience then the only 
letters you received from girls 
would perhaps be more fre- 



quent and positive. 
Saraant&e Brydon, 
Nottingham. 

We have no regrets in print- 
ing Dominic Andoh 's letter. 
We've never received a letter 
so blatantly sexist as his, and 
felt it was worth printing to 
see what everyone else felt. 
As a matter of fact we have 
received very little response 
— either because everyone is 
sick and tired of the whole 
debate, or perhaps they all 
agree with Dominic (perish 
the thought). 
Thoughts of Mr Andoh 's 
rs horn the TGM offices 
ranged from pervert" to 
"well, at ieasi he has the 
courage to admit it'. Sadly, 
the computer industry is 
reflected to the outside world 
through its advertising — 
and like the car industry is 
aimec* at egotistical and sex- 
ist males. If you stand in a 
computer shop for a couple of 
hours you soon get an idea of 
what a real software buyer 
looks like — an everyday 
NORMAL person (and usual- 
ly male — at least the ad 



men have THAT correct). We 
would ail welcome mow 
women in the industry, and 
not just in PR bimbo posi- 
tions 

Seen any games from 
female programmers recent- 
ly? Not likely In fact they 
seem to be too sensible for 
that and stick to graphics, 
like the superb Dawn Drake 
at Ocean. Even the magazine 
industry is talcing time to 
adjust. And it's not the fault 
of the employers, women 
often seem to like being 
pigeonholed in certain jobs. 
Around 90% of freelance arti- 
cles offered for TGM come 
from blokes. In fact we've 
only received one from a 
woman in the past four 
months: Ruth Pracy, who's 
just started the hilarious 
Idiot's Guide to.,., this month 
featuring Marketing People 
(PR people). 

Ladies, if you want a mare 
balanced coverage, it's up to 
you to prove to the computer 
industry, like Samantha has, 
that YOU ARE out there, and 
want some service. 



Recycled software 



Dear TGM 

Whilst listening to the radio 
not long ago, 1 happened to 
hear a short report on a sub- 
ject which, m my opinion, has 
particular relevance to the 
software industry. It concerns 
the destruction of the world's 
rain forests. I was astonished 
when it was revealed that a 
staggering one million trees 
are cut down each year to pro- 
duce the cassette/CD inlays 
and record sleeves for ail new 
albums and singles each year 



So in response to this appeal, 
artists are being asked to use 
recycled paper for their 
albums; which costs relatively 
little at today's prices. 

The relevance in this is how 
many more trees are cut down 
to supply the necessary docu- 
mentation for computer 
games? Surely the major soft- 
ware houses are aware of the 
problem, and if so, should be 
doing something about it. As 
I, and I'm sure a lot of other 
computer owners, are worried 



about the current environmen- 
tal crisis, something must be 
done to help prevent the 
unnecessary destruction of 
the precious rain forests. As 
usual, it's up to the companies 
themselves. With enough 
pressure, results may be 
achieved. 
JM Hurrell, Cornwall. 

Well, software companies. 
what about it? And until they 
do. why don 't TGM readers 
set an example by writmg let- 
ters on recycled papers them- 
selves (including yourself, Mr 
Hurrell!). 



Thanks for 

8-bit 

Dear TGM 

Thank you for having equal 
16-bit and 8-bit reviews, Most 
magazines are dominated by 
the 16-bits now. Thank you, 
Colin Stanton, Essex. 

Well, there's no doubt that 
TGM leans slightly toward 16- 
bit computers. However, we 
haven 1 forgotten that there 
are more 9-bit computer own- 
ers out there than any other. 



S2TGMTX022 9-89 



Centre Bytes 



More PC games 



Deal TGM 

In Issue 20 1 saw the 'bril- 
liant' competitions that you 
did. Brilliant, huh! Why in 
the Ast&roth competition did 
you only have the game 
available in anything but the 
PC? I would have liked to 
win the video recorder, but 
what if I only got a runner-up 
pnze? Where would that put 
me then. 

On the second competition 
(win the Porsche 959) I 
would have loved to win the 
top prize, but again I already 
have a copy of The Duel. 
Should 1 have entered it any- 
way and won another copy of 
The Duel ^^^^^^^m 
{which is 



ing our coverage accordingly. 
Unlike the States (where the 
PC takes 50% of all software 
sales}, the UK still views the 
PC as a business machine, 
basically because most peo- 
ple have only been able to 
afford cheap Amstrads with 
poor graphical capabilities 
and laughable sound. In the 
States you can pick up a 
decent machine fot the same 
price as an Amstrad ovei 
here, therefore people 
bought them fot games too 

In the UK we tend to value 
money much mote than folks 
in America (hug is beautiful 
m the States}. And the 



wicked fp 

On the 
third compo, 
I hear Blood 
Money is 
coming out 
for the PC, 
hut how are 
us PC users 
meant to 
earn a copy 
if we can't 
even enter 
the competi- 
tion?! 

Please, in 
your wicked 
mag, try and ^^^^^^^^ m 
review more software 
(games, art/animation, 
music, etc) for the PC and 
compatibles, 
Greg Wise, Basingstoke. 

It's very difficult to find a 
popular game on all formats 
to base a competition 
around. Fact is that Astaioth 
is only available on the ST 
and Amiga (no 8-bits either}, 
and it was possible to win an 
Al poster and Carrie, the 
book (without even hairing a 
computer /J. As to winning 
another copy of The Duel: 
Test Drive II, well it's Like 
that for everyone! 

Although the ST and 
Amiga are TGM's major 16- 
bit computers, we are al ways 
Joe-Jung at the growing popu- 
larity of the PC, and chang> 




Amiga and Atari ST are 
unbelievably good value 
compared to the PC. But, as 
you will start to become 
aware, TGM is beginning to 
cover more and more aspects 
of the PC Issue 20 s Indiana 
Jones Preview Special 
showed PC screens, and the 
Controversy column was on 
the PC's viabihty fot games. 
There's also the normal cov- 
erage of PC games, and 
Toolbox regularly features PC 
gimmicks. This issue's fea- 
ture on the Parsec graphics 
mterface is apphcable to the 
PC as much as (probably 
more than} any other IB-bit 
machine. We've also got a 
few PC sound features lined 
up. PC owners, keep your 
eyes and ears open for cover- 
age m TGM. 



No Amstrad action 



Dear TGM 

1 am afraid that this is a letter 
of complaint. Why is it that 
you neglect E-bit computers 

in your magazine? All right I 
admit that 16 -bits are more 
advanced than 8-bits, but the 
majority of people in Britain 



own the latter. Every month I 
open my magazine and find 
page after page of reviews on 
16-bit games with perhaps 
(with the aid of a magnifying 
glass} one or two tiny reviews 
on 8 -bit games. Unfortunately 
these reviews have no pic- 



tures of the game graphics, 
no description of the games 
plot and a naff percentage 
mark at the end of it. 

For example just look again 
at your review of Hewson's 
Stormlord on the Amstrad 
CPC (TGM 019) and you will 
find that you printed no pic- 
tures, didn't say anything of 
the game plot and gave it only 
84%. I happen to own the 
game, and the graphics and 
gameplay are the best I've 
seen on the Amstrad. In fact I 
was not the only person to 
share this view, many other 
major computer magazines 
gave Stormlord a percentage 
over 90 and wrote large 
reviews on the game with 
plenty of screen shots. 

Do you at The Games 
Machine headquarters actual- 
ly play the 8 -bit games or do 
you just read what's on the 
back cover and base your 
review on that? Perhaps you 
should call your magazine 
The Amiga and ST Games 
Machine as so much of your 
magazine is full of 16-bit 
games reviews, playing tips, 
and art and business pack- 
ages. If you reviewed more 8- 
bit games, of which there are 
plenty about, perhaps you 
would seU more copies as 
more 8-bit gamers would buy 
your magazine. 
TM Vant, Essex. 
(PS: I own an Amstrad CPC 
464 computer which I think is 
absolutely brilliant.) 

Well, you seem to have a Jot 
of facts VERY wrong. As a 
magazine that has sister 
Spectrum and Commodore 
dedicated magazines, we see 
ever single bit of software 
that's available for the 
MAJOR 8-bit owners But we 
also review every single bit of 
Amstrad software that we 
receive. However you don 't 
seem to understand the way 
the TGM review process 
works. The review' of 
Stormlord that you refer to is 
actually a Version Update 
Version Updates only state 
the differences between com- 
puter formats, and their own 
success on that format. Above 
each Version Update is a list 
of ratings and issues for the 
reviews of other formats, plus 
the issue of the main review 
(why repeat the storyiine. it 's 
the same on all formats) . 

Stormlord 's main review 
was in Issue 19, in which a 
whole page was devoted to 
the Spectrum version 
(because it happened that 
that was the first version 
available for review). It's a 
fact that the Amstrad version 
is always out after the main 
formats (PC owners suffer the 



same problem}. It seems that 
your gripe has more to do 
with the Amstrad versions 
always coming out after 
everyone else! I suggest you 
buy a more popular computer 
if that's the problem I (Like an 
MSX!) 



Programmers 
BEWARE! 

Dear TGM 

Software companies beohokl 
It is Mechanical It is 
Biological. It is,. BORING!!! 

If I see one more 
Golo^unning, Menacing, DNA 
fighting, Hyperforcing, Sky- 
Raying, Xenon mg, 
Sidewindering, Fusjoning, 
Zynappmg. Star -Goosing or 
Hellbendmg vertical/horizon- 
tal scrolling mumbo, jumbo, 
trash-bash, rubbish I'll R- 
Type your rear ends! ! 

Be careful all unoriginal 
programmers — this time I'M 
BEHIND YQUIM (And my 
Bazooka doesn't fire plasma 
lasers...) 
Olir Galmor, Israel. 

Go more for the real thing, do 
you? 



Best in 
US 



Dear TGM 

I have recently started read- 
ing TGM, after spotting it at a 
news stand alongside the 
usual collection of American 
computer magazines. All I 
can say is, what a difference! 
Not only can I read about 
(and order by mail) software 
not available in the US, but 1 
can now make informed deci- 
sions about software pur- 
chases. This is because NO 
American computer magazine 
ever publishes anything even 
resembling a negative 
review, probably for fear of 
losing advertising revenue. 
Also, the American maga- 
zines contain only a few 
reviews per issue, and many 
times the reviews are of 
games that have bean avail- 
able for months. 

In issues of TGM (and the 
other Newsf ield magazines 
available here}, I have seen 
advertisements for software 
on one page and negative 
reviews of the same software 
on another page, what a 
concept! Impartial, objective 






TGM TX 022:9-89 53 



C&ntre Bytes 



reviews! 

Yes. the British magazines 
are more expensive than the 
American ones, but it is 
worth it. I no longer have to 
waste money on lousy soft- 
ware, with my purchase 
based on the gushing 
reviews written in American 
computer magazines. I 
always had the feeling that 
England was good for some- 
thing besides Monty Python 
reruns! 

Leslie D Blaise, New Jersey. 
USA. 

Leslie, 1 think you're going to 
he even happier irom next 
issue {23). TGM will be cover- 
ing American activity in a 
BIG way, with a whole 
section of the magazine 
devoted to the subject four 
times a year. 

Home readers will also ben- 
efit from this special section 
as all the things covered win 
eventually reach the shores of 
the UK, They'U also be some 
free gifts to go with it. Read 
about if first in TGM I (More 
information on page 98.) 

Something that should also 
please you, as well as many 
other readers, is thai Virgin 
have recently picked up the 
rights to produce a Monty 
Python game. 



The Ed writes 

On the subject Of JM HurreU'S 
letter (previous page) of recy- 
cled paper, I thought I would 
add my own comments. First 
I'm not against eco-matters, 
greenery Or anything of the 
kind, but I trunk it's important 
that such matters don't 
become swamped in emotion- 
al hype (such as BBC Radio 
One's programmes often did) 
and therefore cloud some 
facts. 

Recycled paper is NOT 
cheap — at the moment — 
simply because there isn't 
much production. Also, to 
remove the old ink, far more 
bleach is used than in new 
paper manufacturing — and 
where do you think all that 
bleach ends up...? 

The biggest area of concern 
is the tropical ram forests 
which produce hardwoods 
used in furniture, sea walls 
and many other things. 
Printing paper is made from 
very fast-growing (and 
replaced) light spruce woods, 
and almost every European 
magazine is printed on paper 
made in Finland from such 
trees. Let's be eco, but not 
daft. Any comments? 
Roger Kean, TGM Editor 



The good ship TGM 



Dear TGM 

Years ago when the My com- 
puter is better than yours' 
debate was still m its infancy 
there was another argument 
that used to rattle through the 
computer magazines of that 
era (inch thick jobs, full of 
type-in listings). That argu- 
ment was based on the way 
that the specialist Commodore 
and Sinclair magazines were 
becoming more and more like 
comics in both style and 
appearance. 

Well, here we are some five 
years later and it only takes a 
brief glance at Sinclair User or 
Zzap! 64 to realise that those 
predictions were true. Each 
page is full of badly drawn 
illustrations of stick men say- 
ing naff jokes. It is impossible 
to read a paragraph of text 
without having to read some 
pathetic comment from the 
magazine's editor, usually 
written in brackets and fol- 
lowed off by an exclamation 
mark. Unfortunately this is 
beginning to happen to some 
of the newer multi-user maga- 
zines : namely Computer and 
Video Games. ACE and The 
One. 

C+VG has always been a 
big comic so it was inevitable 
that The One would follow the 
same dusty path. When EMAP 
took it upon themselves to 
purchase the once-excellent 
ACE. they not only blessed it 
with the same morons who 
already wrote for The One and 
C+VG but they also included 
their own unique technique of 
printing half a review and for- 
getting to print the rest, or 



maybe printing a monochrome 
Spectrum screen shot next to 
the preview of the latest 16- 
bit blockbuster 

This, however, is not a letter 
totally full of gloom because 
sailing through the mists of 
these 'childish' magazines 
comes the good ship TGM. 
When TGM was originally 




launched you too were packed 
full Of the Stick men and 
Mercy Dash was nothing 
short of embarrassing (Cutie 
poo, I must admit, was amus- 
ing), After a few editions how- 
ever you soon pulled yourself 
together and became the 
quality entertainment maga 
zine that this ever-changing 
market needs. You write your 
reviews with good humour 



but still maintain the style of 
writing that the potential 
buyer needs. Your news cov- 
erage is also well laid out and 
is straight and to the point, I 
believe that the one thing that 
singles you out from the rest 
are your excellent features. 
They make a really good read 
and you also make good use 
of the photographs and 
illustrations (I loved the 
article on Hewson), 
I hope you carry on being 
the oasis in the desert of 
trashy magazines and I 
wish you good luck on 
your lone crusade for 
quality entertainment 
publications 
James Cold well, Essex, 

Thanks for all the praise, 
and very incisive com- 
ments on the computer 
magazine world. As most 
users of 16-bit machines 
(which TGM is slightly 
biased towards) are gen- 
erally older than 8-bit 
users (go in any software 
shop and you '11 see what 
we mean) so is TGM in 
its presentation of fea- 
tures and reviews As far 
as we're concerned read- 
ers don '£ want some flowery 
review saying little more than 
the inlay, with a comment 
about as decisive as Neil 
Kinnock's election manifesto. 
Moneys worth as much to us 
as it is to you, so we don't 
make our choices for Star 
PlayersAJpdate lightly — 
that's why we often underrate 
games in some people's eyes. 



Lies, damned lies! 



Dear TGM 

It was with some disquiet 
that I read, in the latest 
issue of The Games 
Machine, the imputations 
and insinuations of your 
writer Nick Roberts on the 
subject of my Coconut 
Capers T-shirt (Controversy, 
Issue 21). 

While it is true that this T- 
shirt has been a frequent 
and much-trusted compan- 
ion over the years, and 
indeed has a small sweat 
stain as testimonial to its 
sterling service at last year's 
PC Show, I utterly reject the 
suggestion that I have 
shown it any favouritism or, 



more seriously, that we have 
any unnatural relationship. 
There has never been any- 
thing between myself and 
any of my T-shirts; I have 
nothing to get off my chest 
there. 

Furthermore. Mr Roberts' 
article ignored, surely not 
through ignorance, the enor- 
mous debt which 1 owe my 
Thalamus T-shirt, without 
which so much of my life and 
work would have been so 
much more arduous and 
which, indeed, is by my side 
as write. 

Yours in favour of the right 
to bare arms. 
Barnaby Page, Media Week 



Limited, London WC2. 

Perhaps one point Nick 
Roberts did overlook. Mr 
Page, is that, strictly speak- 
ing, any freebies received 
from a software house by an 
employed member of staff 
remain the property of the 
magazme said goods were 
sent to (and in effect are only 
loaned' to staff during their 
tenure). Therefore, may we 
please have back by return 
of post: a Leisure Suit Larry 
towel, and IBM puzzle toy. 
your trips to Madrid, 
Frankfurt and Amsterdam, 
some Ocean wine, an Oracle 
propelling pen cil 



54TGMTX021:8-89 



Now Scart or PAL TV £159.95 + £5.00 P & P includes Tales of Monster Path FREE! 
VHS VIDEO ONLY £8.95 inc p & p ......Coming Soon We PROMISE! 

(will now include Sega Megadrive titles) 



SPECIAL OFFER Buy 

any two games and get 
one game free! 

Buy any two £29.95 PC 
Engine titles and get either, 
Tales of the Monster Path 
or Drunken Master ■ 



MEGADRIVE 

SEGA MEGADRIVE IN SCART> 

£179.95 + £5.00 p&p 

SEGA MEGADRIVE IN PAL TV*> 

£199.95 + £5.00 p&p 

{'Available soon. 

Send SAE for Order Form Now) 

SEGA SOFTWARE 

Alt £29.95 + £1.50 p&p, 2 or more 

titles £2.75 p&p 

Altered Beast Alex Kidd Space 

Thunder Blade Space Harrier 

Super League Ghouls and 

Ghosts 

Coming Soon: 

Outrun, Afterburner, Powerdrltt, 

Shlnobie 



LIMITED 



ONLY £19.99 each while 
stocks last +£1 .50 p&p 
GALAGA *88, SHANGHAI, 
MAHJONG, DRAGON 
SPIRIT 



OVER 54 PC ENGINE TITLES 




AVAILABLE NOW INCLUDING: 




Shanghai 


Tales of the 


Energy Man 


Wonderboy 


Monster Path 


Action Man 


Drunken Master 


Nectaris 


Miss Mo Mo 


Victory Run 


Deep Blue 


Pacland 


Galaga '88 


Out Live 


Naxat Open 


Chan & Chan 


Fl Pilot 


Power Golf 


R-Type I 


Dungeon Explorer 


Wars of Dead 


R-Type II 


Space Harrier 


Gateball 


World Stadium 


Vigilante 


Poor Story 


Alien Crush 


Son Son II 


Japan Warrior 


Baseball 


Moto Reader 


Ninja Warriors 


Dragon Spirit 


Money Sky (Face) 


Gunhead 


Mahjong 


P47 


Fianl Lap Twin 


Fantasy Zone 


Golf Biy 


Cyber Cross 


Legendary Axe 


Winning Shot 


Side Arms 


World Court 


Her os Legend 


Fire Pro Wrestling 


Tennis 


Ultimate Tiger 





All at £29.95 + £1 .50 p&p or £2.75 2 or more games 

Due In stock soon: 

Double Dungion, Power League II, Darius, Bloody Wolf, Altered 
Beast, Virus II, Jack Nicklolas Championship Golf, Formation 
Armed F, Out Run, Afterburner, Operation Wolf t Shinobi, R-Type, 
Mr Heli, Wardener, Fl Dream, Ordyne, Thunderblade. 

CD RDM TITLES 

(all at £31 .95 + £1 ,50 p&p or £2.75 for 2 games or more) 

Fighting Street No-RI-Ko Singer Wonder Boy Cobura Warriors 2 

Ultraspace Story 

Coming soon: 

Virus II, Rainbow Island, Y-S I and 2, Monster Lair 



LIMITED OFFER 

CD ROM AT ONLY £299.95 + £5.00 p&p 
Including "COBRA" FREE!!! 
(Note this price includes the CD Rom 
and interface) 



Japanese Cartridge Converter & Operation Wolf £43.95 inc p&p This converter allows the use of 
over 500 Japanese titles torunon the UK system. Most are in English on screen and cost 
only£24.99 each from MENTION!) Send SAE for details which will be sent mid August, listing 
theSOQ available titles. (For those who have already sent a SAE,the lists are being sent Mid 
August as well. At present we only have Operation Wolf and converters in stock). 



MENTION TECHNICAL SERVICES 



First Retail Outlet at:- 

142 Woodway Lane, 

Wallsgrave, 

W Midlands CV2 2EJ 

Cheques and Postal orders, SAE for detals to 



Mention Technical Services 

Dept GM1 PO Box ie„ Helensburgh G84 7DO 

Telephone:- 

0203 602070/611943 
Enquires:- 0436 78827 



Mention Bank with the Royal Bank ol Scotland. 2 Colquhorn Square. Helensburgh G84 flSJ 

Monday-Friday 9am-5pm MAIL ORDER ONLY. Please allow 28 days for delivery 




We're giving away £1,000 CASH — it could be 
yours if you're this month's GAMES MASTER!! 



WOTTA LOTTA DOSH!! 
You're in the running for £1,000 when you dial 

0898 555 080 



YES!! TGM is giving away £1,000 In straight 
CASH and all that stands between you and an 
improved bank balance is a set of ten QUES- 
TIONS (and the luck of the draw)!!! 

This is the second TGM GAMES MASTER 
Jackpot game. Were searching for this month's 
GAMES MASTER — the person who can answer 
ten software questions and have enough games- 
playing luck to have their answer pulled out of 
the golden-lined sack first on September 20. 

The questions are all related to the games fea- 
tured in this month's Issue. 

Just pick up your phone and dial 0898 555 080 



TGM's Games Master Jatkpol Game is produced in conjunction with 
Chatt&rbox Ltd. Calls cost 25p per min off-peak, 3Bp all Other times. 
It you don't pay the 'phone bill — - please ash the person who does 
before making ihrs call — okay^ Standard competition rutes apply. 



and you'll hear the questions read out, along 
with three possible answers. As you listen to the 
three possible answers tick the box on the entry 
form below which you think corresponds to the 
right answer — A,B or C. 

When you've answered all TEN questions, 
complete the form with your name, address and 
phone number and send it to: GAMES MASTER 
JACKPOT GAME, THE GAMES MACHINE, PO 
Box 10, Ludlow, Shropshire SV8 1DB. We'll put 
all the entries in a sack and the first entry pulled 
out at 0.30am on September 20 wins £1,000! It 
could be you!!! 




£1,000 


1. 


a 


a 


2. 


® 


HI 


3. 


a 


[3 


A. 


u 


co 


5. 


iJ 


n 


6. 


a 


CO 


7. 


a 


3 


8. 


a 


U 


9. 


a 


CD 



10.3 ID 



JACKPOT ENTRY FORM 

, I I'm incredibly desperate to win £1 ,000 cash, so I've ticked what 
I hope are trie right boxes in answer to the TGM Games Master 
H-J Jackpot game... 

3) Name ... , 

3) Address . - — — - ••• 

m ~~. ..^ ■■ "- ■ 

I^| .„„,.. .....Postcode .. „, 

UiJ Telephone number. 

^ GAMES MASTER JACKPOT GAME, TGM t PO BOX 10, 
£J LUDLOW, SHROPSHIRE SY8 1DB 



Printed here are the 
numbers which connect 
you directly to the TGM 
Hotline services. We've 
got 160 lines, open 24 
hours a day, so don't 
worry about the service 
being engaged. 

Grab the latest news on 
what's happening on the 
TGM News Update line 
0898 555 088 

Games players are also 
well catered for.,, Robin 
Candy is working 
overtime and getting all 
the hottest tips on the 
latest games Need 
help, ring the TGM Tips 
Hotline 0898 555 087 



Centre Bytes 



GUIDE TO 






J 












COMPUTER 
SYSTEMS 



8-BIT 



ACORN BBC 

NOTE The BBC has appeared 
in many models: BBC A, BBC B r 
BBC B+, BBC Master Series and 



BBC Master Compact. Only the 
last two are now available, 
Listed below are the specifica- 
tions for the BBC Master 
Compact , 

Despite its name, the BBC 
range has always been pro- 
duced hy Acorn (who now do 



the Archimedes). But when the 
British Government decided to 
put computers in schools, they 
called on Auntie Beeb to pro- 
vide a specification for manu- 
facturers to work to — and 
Acorn got the contract, 
PRICE Master 1ZB E458.B5: 




■ PRICE (usually the recom- 
mended retail price ), including 
VAT. Computers are bemg sold 
with 'bundles' (software, joy- 
stick etc) more and mors often, 
and prices change frequently. 
Sometimes particular high' 
street shops offer ilieir own 
bundles, so shop around and 
watch TQM for advance 
reports. 

■ MEMORY Don't be fooled by 
demos or publicity which 
show an apparently cheap 

machine running fantastically 
sophisticated software. Many 
computers — the ST, for 
instance — come in different 
versions with different memo- 
lies, and because of chip 
pnces, memory is currently 
very expensive. This is partic- 
ularly important in packages 
using digitised graphics or 
sampled music. 

Memory is; measured Ln 
bytes (I hyte= number of bits 
machine is, eg 16-bit), kilo- 
bytes (IK- 1024 bytes), or 
megabytes (1Mb- 1 .043,576 
bytes] 

A few expensive models 
have hard disks — literally 
that, bard disks built into the 
amputee They're useful for 
stating frequently-used appli- 
cations software, because you 
can load from them much 
quicker than from a disk or 
tape drive (external drive" J. 
But for gamers, they're really a 
waste of money. 

■ PROCESSOR The Important 
aspects of a processor are a) 
worn: length and b) speed. A 
long word and high speed 
mean complex graphics can 
move very quickfy (and num- 
bat-crunching in applications 
like databases is speeded up 
too] Word length is usually 6. 
16 or 32 bits — a 16-bft 
machine can process twice as 
much information at one go as 



an S-hit machine. Speed is usu- 
ally measured in megahertz 
(MHz), which means 'million 
things done each second', 

Most personal computers 
have one processor to make 
the software do its stuff; some, 
like the Amiga, also have 'ded- 
icated 1 processors to handle 
graphics and sound, which 
free the main processor to do 
other things (this is called mul- 
titasking), 

■ RESOLUTION, or the num- 
ber of pixels on the screen. 
High resolutions mean more 
detailed, realistic graphics, 
Resolution is measured with 
two numbers: y number of 
pixel columns across the 
screen x number of pixel rows 
down' the screen However, 
high resolutions can generally 
use fewer colours together on 
the same screen, because they 
take mare memory. Under this 
heading we've noted how 
many colours are available 
onscreen at any one time. 

■ COLOUR PALETTE the total 
number of colours available on 
the computer (though not at 
the same time!) - 

■ SOUND The important fac- 
tors here are channels (the 
number of different pitches 
that can be played at a time) 
and pitch range (measured in 
octaves — an octave is the dis- 
tance from, say, one C to the 
next on the piano). 

■ VIDEO Most games comput- 
ers can be connected to the TV 
or to a monitor, via a lead 
which plugs into a port. 

Today, most monitor output 
is the high-quality ROB stan- 
dard. But some older machines 
(such as BBC and MSX micros) 
use composite video output, 
which doesn't allow such high 
resolution 



■ SOFTWARE FORMAT 
Software comes on tape, disk, 
ROM cartridge, ROM card, or 
CD ROM Generally this Isn't a 
factor in purchasing — if the 
machine Is important enough, 
people will produce software 
for it. However, there are a few 
considerations... 

Tapes are notoriously slow 
to load (and less reliable 
disks). Amstrad's 3 -inch disks 
are used only on their CPC. 
PCW and Spectrum +3 models. 
which means graphics, words 
etc stored on them cannot be 
used in another machine with- 
out communications software 
and hardware. 

And if you buy a FC-compat- 
ihle, try to go for one with a 
3.5-lflCh disk drive — 5.26-inch 
disks are fast becoming 
unpopular, and the software 
supply in that format may dry 
up. 

Also. If you're doing i 
than playing games, make 
sure the machine can format 
large-memory disks (all blank 
disks must be formatted before 
use). It could be ftusl 
wnte a 450K masterpiece if all 
you'v e got is an Atari 520 
STFM — yes, the memory can 
handle it, but disks formatted 
by this model can only take 
360Kofdata 

Blank disks usually cost 
around £3, 

■ PORTS Joysticks, printers, 
modems, mice. MIDI music 
equipment, extra disk drives 
etc all plug into special ports. 
Make sure the model yon 
choose has all the ports you 
need — and where salesmen 
are concerned, never take 
"probably 1 for an answer. 

■ SOFTWARE It's obvious 
but., tjiai incredibly fast, 
cheap new wonder is useless 
unless there are some games 
to run on it ' 




Master Compact £396.75 on its 
own, £417 45 with TV modula- 
tor, C45B.85 with mono monitor, 
£626.75 with colour monitor 
MEMORY 128K 
PROCESSOR B-bit 65C12 
RESOLUTION Several modes, 
ranging from 160x256 (16 
colours onscreen) to 640x256 
(black and white). 
SOUND four-channel six-octave 
auLput through internal speak- 
er. However, with an add-on 
MIDI interface the BBC series 
has become popular with a 
number of professional musi- 
cians; bands such as .Erasure 
and Bros have been known to 
use the BBC to as a MIDI con- 
troller. 

VIDEO Composite Video, RGB, 
optional TV modulator avail- 
able. 

SOFTWARE FORMAT Cassette 
and disk. 

PORTS 50-way expansion port, 
joystick/mouse port, Centronics 
parallel, PCB Shugart standard 
disk drive interface 
SOFTWARE There's a vast 
range of educational software 
and applications, because until 
recently the BBC was the most 
common computer in British 
schools (it's now being overtak- 
en by PC -compatibles and, 
occasionally, STs and Amigas). 
A few games still appear. 

AMSTRAD CPC 

PRICE The CPC464 (built in 
tape deck) is £199 with green- 
screen monitor or £299 with 
colour monitor. CPC664 models 
are no longer produced The 
CPC6128 (one built-in external 
disk drive) is £299 with green- 
screen monitor or £399 with 
colour monitor. 

MEMORY CPC464/CPC664 64K, 
CPC6128 128K 

PROCESSOR 8 -bit Zilog Z80. 4 
MHz 

RESOLUTION 160K200 (up to 
16 colours onscreen). 320x200 
(4 colours) or 640x200 (mono), 
COLOUR PALETTE 27 colours 
and shades 

SOUND thtee-channel eight- 
octave through built-m speaker, 
but stereo output is available. 
Sound quality is reminiscent of 
early arcade machines. No MIDI 
ports. 

VIDEO Monitor supplied with 
all models. RGB sync output, 
SOFTWARE FORMAT Tape or 
3-inch disk Disk drives format 
to 1B0K on each side. 
PORTS CPC464 has Centronics 



TGM TX 022:9-89 57 



Centre Bytes 



parallel. 6-pin DIN RGB with 
sync luminance, 3.5mm stereo 
socket, joystick. PCS extension 
port for disk drive and RS-232 
serial interfaces. 
CPC664/6128 have Centronics 
parallel. 6-pin DIN RGB with 
sync luminance, 3.5mm stereo 
socket, joystick, cassette port, 
PCB extension port and second 
disk drive port. 

SOFTWARE Most Spectrum 
and C64 games are converted 
to the CPC but they tend to run 
slightly slower The CPC6128 is 
capable of running CP/M so a 
good selection of business 
packages are available. 

COMMODORE 
C64/C128 

PRICE C64 is E129.&9 including 
dedicated Commodore cassette 
deck and some free software. 
C128D including disk drive 
E399.99 

MEMORY C64 S4K. 

C123/C128DI28K. 
PROCESSOR C64 B-bit 6510 2 
MH2, C128/C12ED 8 -bit 6502 
plus 6- bit Zilog Z8Q, 4 MHz, 
RESOLUTION C64 320x200 
(eight colours onscreen, but 
attribute system limits the 
number of colours that can be 
placed adjacent to each other ). 
C12B/C12BD in 128K mode has 
a resolution of 6 40x2 00, 
COLOUR PALETTE 15 colours 
and shades. 

SOUND three-channel eight 
octave sound chip which out- 
puts through the monitor/TV. 
The 6581 SID chip (Sound 
Interface Device) is one of the 
most sophisticated sound chips 
on a 8- bit computer. 
VIDEO TV ports on all models. 
C64 has a composite video 
port, C128/C128D both have 
RGB ports for an 80-column 
display. 

SOFTWARE FORMAT Tape or 
5 25-inch disk (C128D only.), 
Commodore also manufacture 
two external 5. 26- inch drives 
— the CI 541 (formats to 140K) 
and the CI 571 (formats to 
340K) Blank disks very cheap, 
but easily damaged. 
PORTS RGB (C12B/C128D), 
composite video (C64), two joy- 
stick ports, cassette. TV, 
expansion pott, serial ( non- 
standard), user port. 
SOFTWARE The Commodore 
64 is an old computer with 
years worth of games and util- 
ities, many imported from 



America, Many users, so new 
software likely to flow for some 
years yet. ZBO chip on 
C128/C128D allows it to run 
software written for CP/M 
operating systems. 

MSX-II 

NOTE MSX and its successors, 

MSX-II and MSX-U.+ , are not 
brand names of actual machines 
— MSX is a compatibility stan- 
dard, or a set of rules for design- 
ing computers, developed by 
Japanese inventor Kay Nishi in 
the early Eighties. 

The situation is a bit like that 
of PC -compatibles: many manu- 
facturers have produced MSX 
machines, but basically the 
same software runs on them all. 
The most famous MSX manufac- 
turers are Sony. 

PRICE Pi ices start from about 
£340 and rise according to 
model The MSX-II + (see 
TGM014 news) is still not offi- 
cially available in Britain. 
MEMORY Models range from 
64K to 256K. 

PROCESSOR fl -bit Zilog Z80A. 
3 57 MHz. 

RESOLUTION Various modes: 
512x212, 256x212, 612x424 
(interlace). 

COLOUR PALETTE 256 colours 
and shades. The MSX-II+ has 
19,268 colours! 

SOUND three channel eight- 
octave sound chip which out- 
puts through monitor/TV. 
VIDEO TV port and SCART plug 
for RGB monitors. 
SOFTWARE FORMAT Tape, 
ROM cartridge or 3. 5 -inch disk. 
PORTS Varies according to 
model but most include TV, 
Centronics parallel, two joystick 
ports, MSX expansion port, DIN 
plug to connect to cassette 
recorder, and cartridge port. 
SOFTWARE Plenty of games 
and applications ate available, 
but don't expect to find much in 
the high street- The most well- 
known MSX supporters in 
Britain are Konami, who run a 
users' software club — (0626) 

56789 

MSX software is upwardly 
compatible — that is. software 

written for the MSX will run on 
the MSX-II and the MSX -11+ (but 
not vice- versa I). 

The MSX machines have the 
same BASIC programming lan- 
guage (called MSX BASIC) and 
the same Microsoft operating 
system (MSX DOS) 




SINCLAIR 

ZX SPECTRUM 

NOTE The Spectrum, now man- 
ufactured by Amstrad. has 
appeared in many models: 16K, 
48K, 48K+. 128K+. +2, *3 and 
+2A. Only the last three are 
now available new. 
PRICE *2/+2A with built-in tape 
deck costs E139; +3 with one 
built-in external disk drive, light 



tape recorder and a TV port. 
128K+ has expansion port, TV 
port, Vero phone connector for 
MIDI/RS-232 serial, two 3,5mm 
jack sockets, RGB port. Veio 
phone connector for add-on 
keypad. 

+2 has expansion port r TV 
port, RGB port and Veto phone 
connectors as 128K+; also two 
non-standard joystick ports and 
a 3,5mm socket for outputing 




gun, joystick and six games 
£199. Other models available 
very cheap secondhand 
MEMORY/ Mostly obvious from 
names I +2/+2A and +3 have 
126K. 

PROCESSOR B-bit Zilog Z80. 4 
MHz 

RESOLUTION 256x192 (eight 
colours onscreen, but only two 
colours can be used in any 
given 8x8 -pixel block. This often 
causes 'colour clash' in games 
that use a lot of colour.) 
COLOUR PALETTE 8 colours, 
can be increased to 16. 
SOUND 128K+, +2, +2A and +3 
have three-channel output via 
monitor or TV. 16K/4BK/4BK+ 
have one-channel output via 
built-in speaker. +3 has built-in 
non-standard MIDI port. 
VIDEO All have TV port. 128K+, 
*2 and +3 also have RGB ports. 
SOFTWARE FORMAT Mostly 
tape. Early models load from 
ordinary cassette player (extra 
cost), -s-2 has built-in tape deck. 
+3 takes 3 inch disks, though 
many people prefer to use tape 
because of disk-loading prob- 
lems; one built-in reversible sin- 
gle-sided external disk drive can 
format disks to 1 80K each side. 
PORTS 16K/48K/48K+ expan- 
sion port, two 3.5mm jack sock- 
ets to connect the Spectrum to a 



sound. 

+3 is as 128K- and also has 
Centronics parallel printer port 
and port for second disk drive. 
Early +3s have two 3.5mm 
audio in/out jack sockets, later 
models have one which per- 
forms the same function. Also 
MIDI port on the later models 

The recently -released +2A is 
technically virtually identical to 
the +3. apart from the fact that 
it has no disk drive. On the out- 
side, it looks like a +2 except 
that it's black, rather than grey. 
However, U has several serious 
incompatibility problems and 
will not work with many + add- 
ons. 

SOFTWARE The Spectrum is 
the biggest-selling home com- 
puter in the UK and (at an 
informed guess) at least 2,000 
games are available. Until the 
growth of 16-bit this year, most 
of the great classics were 
Spectrum titles — many still 
are. A wide range of utilities is 
also available, but the machine 
is inadequate for graphics 
work. Slow/unreliable loading 
and small memory cause severe 
problems with any data pro- 
cessing (eg accounting, word 
process mg). 

NEXT MONTH 32- AND 16-BIT 
COMPUTERS AND CONSOLES, 



58TGMTX022:9-89 



UNCLE MEL'S TRIVIA QUIZ 




1) True or false , 

Activision's Cosmic 
Osmo is the biggest 
ever computer game. 

2) What has Mick 
Fleetwood designed for 
the Atari Stacy laptop? 

3) True or false, the 
Kurzweil image scan- 
ner interfaces with the 
Lotte Lenya voice chip 
and the Berth old 
Brecht word processor 
4} Where did the title of 
the sci-fi film Zardoz 
come from? 

5) What is a GLUT? 



6) What do you call a 
magazine that rips off 
Uncle Mel's Trivia Quiz 
arid uses questions 
already published in 
TGM? 

7) The on-board com- 
puter used during the 
first Apollo moon land- 
ing was as sophisticat- 
ed as: a) Schneider 
Portable AT, b) Psion 
Organiser, c) IBM 
PS/2. 

8} What software titles 
have been mixed into 
these toilet habits? 



BOTTIE PURRS, LO 

DEAD BOG RUN, PAN 
SPOT MAT 

9} In what year was the 
soon to be relaunched 
Coleco Vison machine 
originally marketed in 
the UK? 

10) Where does Wally 
Walrus come from? 

11) What is unusual 

about the ROM data in 
the new hand-held from 
Franklin Computer? 

12) Which country 
topped the 1968 
league table for the 



number of home 
micros per head of 
population? 

13) What do floppy disk 
manufacturers Parrot 
and a many-sided geo- 
metric figure have in 
common? 

14) Which game pack- 
aging contains a sur- 
geon's glove and 
mask? 

15) In Return of the 
Jedi, who lives on the 
following planets, 
Tatooine. Dagobah, 
Endor? 



16) What have Konix 
and the Boston 
Strangler got in com- 
mon? 

17) Who created 
Batman 1 ? 

18) Why has the 
National Association of 
Computer Retailers 
changed its named? 

19) What have Softek 
and the editor of TGM 
got in common? 

20) What's the differ- 
ence between the SAM 
Coupe and the Loch 
Ness Monster? 



Answers 



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ipoi em uses 9j\Ablji 

kjuiiu aidosd atuos {{K 

sinue&qi 

joj &ui>(jom ai.Aauj, (fit 

PfclOVN SB 01 P9JJS|9J 



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aue^qog Uv 

jieuo ouioe[3 

am miw aiqnoji (gi 

s>|0W3 am s epoA 

HHH &4) Bqqisr [St 

Mjesg pue ajn (frt 

suoB 



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-pitapat {zt 

a|qig aux p suois 

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'Ajojs 

puEfeaz awn a Hl (QL 

6Z6L (6 

±Vd NVifllSQd 

'No^vea 3ianoo 



xiHdS3 oatiru (a 
KBjd 

-HI 00 3JQLU AjjBUlBjBUJ 

A|uo si issjueGJO uoisd 

aifl tnq "asam jo buon il 

Ajiunpay ajia am (9 

eiqei dn hoot jnopo (g 

ZO P aidVZtM auj. (fr 
japuEnbs 



01 0OOU3 Jof3 s.oum 
auoAue m]M sgsauaiui 

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jei|OJ)uoo pjeoqAa^i 

101 in x°e zioh em (e 

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e iou s.ji '&siej sajAq 

uoi||ilu aajui aruj. (i 



COMPETITION RESULTS 



ASTAROTH 

Hew son Issue 20 

Tom Gib bins, from Taunton, 

receives an Amstrad Video 

Recorder, a copy of Carrie 

on video, the game and a 

poster 

The ten runners- up, who 
each receive the book, a 
poster and a copy of 
Astaroth (or another 8-bit 
Hewson game) are: 
Mike Faraday, Aldershot 
GU23 8HR; Alex Harrison, 
Birkenhead L43 2JY; 
Darren Garbutt. Leeds LS9 
60S; Brett Patterson, 
Sheffield S2 5SB; Paul 
Hobbs, Southampton SOI 
5RP: P Rushton, Market 
Drayton TF9 3DX. 

DUEL DRIVING 

Accolade Issue 20 

The winner of a fabulous 
remote control Porsche Is 
Steve Taylor from Norfolk. 
Congratulations. Steve! 
GAMES MASTER JACKPOT 
The Games Machine/Hotline 
Issue 20 

Theever-sO-luCky (and 
clever) winner of this 
month's £1000 cash prize is 
Brian Lee, from all trie way 
up there In Aberdeen. 




JOYSTICKS 

De Gale Marketing Issue 20 
The two winners of a 
Quickjoy Superboard joy- 
stick (complete with stop- 
watch)} are, H C Cheung, 
from the seaside town of 
Ramsgate, and David 
Coverley from Redcar. 



Greative Game-Player - Is this your Next Move? 

GAMES DESIGNERS 



^Excellent Salary + benefits 

As a Games Designer with our client you 
will be joining a fast-moving, dynamic 
organisation, leaders in the supply and 
manufacture ol electronic gaming sod 
amusement equipment, 
You will be responsible for creating new 
exciting concepts and game-strategies for 
a variety ol amusement machines. 
Liaising with project and graphic teams. 
you will ensure that your ideas appeal to 
the amusement machine puhlic, 
Young and enthusiastic, you are likely to 
be 2! '3D, keen to project your ideas and 
solutions to others and moreover have 
a strong determination to succed, A 
natural innovator with a lively and 
alert mind, you will have a keen 
fascination far puzzles and 



North West 

games and a real interest in problem sol- 
ving. High demands will be placed upon 

you and individuals who are not stimula- 
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successful. The rewards and opportunities 
are excellent for the right person, inclu- 
ding overseas travel on a regular basis. 

If you would enjoy this exciting environ- 
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instance, enclosing full career details, to 
the Company's Advisor. Susan Tyrer. 
Mercuri Urval Ltd. Ship Canal House. King 
Street, Manchester, M2 4WU, 
quoting re I ST/02/39. Tel 061-835 33 55- 



Mercuri urval 



j 



TQM TX 022:9-89 59 



SOFTWARE HITS 



How to order 




Title 
C 6 



KONTX NAVtGATOR 
grand i»w efflorwmicafly deitgn«l 
handheld joyatkl with Rj» Button po- 
.iouwd dirrrfiy b*F*aO> the UiffiP 



MM 

ROMTX MEOABLASTER 
Prate** n»uJd»dnMirjioilaiobw*]i 
***, ih*A for oevbtt triijhiMy. Du- 
ll fin button (bf b* u*d lighl hind 
■j Heavy duty leaf awtahea md rub- 
bet auctjon cup* 
OFFER £*.» 

fcLOFsTW SFEEDICIMG 
fh* wnfc* *"** *«f»l>T ™» 7™ 
Jufid. ?ond*M>lliPltkprn(rf*i*t 
Neal cliciJMIKMlltd. 

OFFER £i<w* 

EUROMAX COBRA 
Innd n>w dtadjps with 8 nucnMwitdy 
m- 1 Aukjfir* buito** md imple nor- 
maJ hi* button provide trigger r*ad> 

ommi« 

EUROMAX ELITE STANDARD 
Short travel nucxoawiteri action ta *r- 
eorroik: utd highly dmr»Hr W(a 
OFFER £#,« 

EURO MAX ELITE GUI* 

Stm« *» EUtt Stundiri, but wlrii iww 



EUROMAX PROFESSIONAL STAN- 
DARD 

tUgh durability, ra-ptd r»*paft***ftd 
■" i Hrtwrrive qufmiint. 
HS-9S 



Label 
D I S 



AMES INDOC* SOCCER 
BUM 

SfMINl WINS 
INNER SPACE 
NlSHTDAWN 
TOMRjJJBtY 



Vtnoesope 
MfTgit: Syfei 

VJrari 
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K 

ill. 9? 

HIP" 
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£11.99 

sn.w 
(1199 



Title 
A M 



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AME.E INDOOR SOCCER 

IEAM 

SOI'l FULL HOUSE 

GEMINI WINS 

INNER SPACE 

NkSHTDAWN 

TOM * JERRY 



Mind^ccajp* 
Mogtaytei 

pomarir 

cm 

rVpagft eyi** 
Mqgitpytei 



7.99 
7.9* 
T-t* 
799 
7.99 
7.99 
7.99 



AUEN LESION 

IEAM 

FIENDISH FREDDY'S BTOF 

fSFMlHi WINS 

GRAND PRIX CIRCUIT 

INDIANA JONES 

KULT 

LEONARDO 

NOW DAWN 

RICK DANOEBOyj 

1D1 

JKATEQFTHEABT 

THE NFW7EALAHD STOR* 

TOM A JERRY 



Label 
A 

SotrotCf" 

MMkBCIM 
l*atn 
AccotoO* 
US SOW 

Srarbyte 

Mog^fV*" 

We&rd 
AtlMHon 

Itmt 
Or eon 
Mfcipfc rJyrm 



Offer 



SI774 
£19 99 
133 99 
SIM* 
$19.94 
S 14.99 
S19 95 
£14.99 
£19.99 
S.19-99 
£19.99 
119 94 
619 W 
£19.99 



ATARI ST 



AMSTRAD CPC DISK 



DOMINATOR 

ELIMINATOR 
INDIANA JONES 



Hmwsctt 
Lfl Sold 



£11.99 
ftll,9T 
il I 99 



AMSTRAD CPC CASS 



ROil FULL HOUSE 
NOMINATOR 

ELIMINATOR 
INDIANA JONES 



Demot 

System 3 
JJJSofrf 



640 
7.99 
7,99 
7.99 



IEAM 

CHARIOTS OF WRATH 

DOMINATOR 

GEMINI WINS 

HAWKEYE 

HELL flAISER 

INDIANA JONES 

LEONARDO 

MRKfU 

NIGHTDAWN 

QUARTZ 

RICK DANGEROUS 

TOM • JERRY 



MogbBrl** 

Syifm 3 

Virgin 
Thotornm 
ExoeeT 
LffiSofd 

sttvtw 

fteord 
Magic Brim* 
Fkmbtti 
ftieteW 

Magic Byte* 



S.I 9 9? 
119.99 
SI 8.99 

614.77 
614.99 
S1S.96 
SIS 79 
£16 99 
SISTv 
tt9 97 
£19.99 
S1999 
61999 



SPECTRUM DISK 



DOMINATOR 
SEMINI WING 
INDIANA JONES 



Syitwm3 
WHO* 

USGakl 



£11.99 
fill 99 
fill 99 



S PECTRU M CASS 



■OB'S FULL HOUSE 
DOMINATOR 
GEMINI WINS 
INDIANA JONES 



EUROMAX PROFESSIONAL GRIP 
Sana mt PnjhKknAlStaniujit. tall 
nritk tfHHtPHk: grip 
OrTER fl3.« 

EUROMAX PROFESSIONAL AUT- 

onlUL 

Sami n f ju fanWMl 5t»rid*fd tul 

with Auiirftf*. 
OFFER EltM 

TfUROMAX MlCfcOUANDLEF 
An trrmy of halum: »nt¥»-«cM«tw 

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OFFER C19.4S 

DYNAMICS COMFt'llllOIN PRO 
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uhj rubbtr rrtum ibt scvwth aanrrtkL 
OTFERCIi-H 

DYNAMICS COMFETmON FRO 

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Smb* u PRO 5«0 MORMAL, but Willi 

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OFFER ti«J9 

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POWEMPLAY ALL pLAOt CRUTS- 

TOI 

With dml ktd In liptctruBi 
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CREEhi 
OFFER £li*» 



P C 



KULT 

41 ARRAY 



System 3 
Vfgn 

US sow 



{uxor 



440 
7*9 
7.99 
7.99 



SEGA 



BA4IRALL 
OALAXV FORC6 

&HQJTIU&TER5 



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SmQO 



£19.94 
SJS79 



£3494 

£29 9S 
S39 9S 



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AMIGA COPySTAND FOR Dl- 

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A T Hand tor digitizing otafKri 

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XEROX 4fl2fj COLOUR INK |¥T 
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Bat rokmt ink i*f printar tar Amlf>* 
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ing Fwr rnklFfil tDtlta 
OFFER nSWJK) 

XEROX CONSUMABLES STARTER 

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lndudea paper roll holder, toll aip*- 

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F ur auto matic ihavt paper biaemoiv 

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lowirio $p*elai Otf« dbctunt toe* to 
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SPECIAL OFFER DISCOUNT TABLE 
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19.96 14.94 4.00 
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24 9*5 33 14 S.*0 
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3496 S79* 7,00 

Pb*t me mb e r , appry the oTacoutM* to 
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riooi 
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DMN 



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CrounhM'l CjUdV lomakrrj r*J 

owi vWes pKKnoil Dajita 
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Computaa ftnaprfculJoryi I5«jert 
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k*m rjctjct** i cfnirl torjaig^ 
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thJ±*hi Jeo BrXa h <*urar*ig 
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mtvvtow iKrJivrkearH Idaoi Grow 

yow ew roclp ■ Mat CrcHjcher i'Vi 

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■rrac-b oT rraale anc? agvicj on 

eenrputwi aomaal STAC - Tony 
Brtde* heaa a lee* at *» SI 
Adventun CiacteH 



■L 

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<frs*& 






Idiot's 



Software Industry 



BY RUTH PRACY 



Part 2: The Marketing Peoplettes 



Marketing peoplettes sell Other People's 
products. They don't really care what the 
product is _ airplanes today, earthworms 
tomorrow — so long as there's a market for 
it. If there isn't a market for it, they'll create 
one. Thats their job. A Marketing Peoplette 
can sell anything to anyone, any time. 



In the Old Days, of course, 
MPs didn't exist. Mankind 
somehow muddled along 
without them, acquiring 
things he really needed and 
could use. 

No-one can say when the 
MPs appeared among us: 
their first tentative approach- 
es to humankind were subtle 
In the extreme and carefully 
orchestrated by MP Infiltration 
(Operations and Espionage 
Divisions) backed up by MP 
Research & Development, 

Marketing Peoplettes, you 
see, are not quite like the rest 
ot us. In fact, they are entirely 
UNLIKE the rest of us. They 
come from a shadowy dimen- 
sion that interfaces with ours 
somewhere along the borders 
ot Reality. Marketing 
Peoplettes are incredibly envh 
ous of Reality. They would like 
to be Real too. 

As MPs can be Real only so 
long as Real People believe 
they are Real, the discovery of 
Marketing gave them the 
chance they had been waiting 
for — Marketing being a busi- 
ness that demands Its person- 
nel to be as flamboyantly Real 
(they call it high profile') as 
possible. Even better, the 
games software industry was 
the answer to a phantom's 
prayer; and they seized on II 
with blood- red talons and 
high, schoo (girlish cries ol 



glee (as designed by MP 
R&D). Wtth that degree of 
chaos going on around them, 
no-one, but no-one, is ever 
going to notice that there are 
those among us who aren't, 
well, exactly US. 

Because they don't actually 
exist in our dimension, their 
bodies when manifested in 
Reality are rather tike smoke: 
one puff of wind and they 
blow away. MP R&D have put 
in a lot of lime and effort to 
prevent this happening. 

Totally dedicated to their 
work (after all, without It they 
would vanish), MPs appear 
mostly as females R&D hav- 
ing discovered (through 
exhaustive analysis of the 
human p si -waves) that cus- 
tomers react best to females 
— it Is believed that there *s 
some correlation between this 
and the fact that most MPs' 
customers are male. They are 
all blonde, not, as you might 
think because Gentlemen 
Prefer Blondes, but because 
peroxide is the most efficient 
way of keeping their syntha- 
halr, which has an alarming 
habit of falling out in their cus- 
tomers' fingers, firmly 
anchored to their heads. 

Brightly-coloured frocks are 
the order of the day — they 
attract attention, and the more 
attention an MP gets, the more 
Real she becomes. These 



frocks are worn TIGHT — 
actually to stop the MPs' bod- 
ies from floating off into the 
stratosphere every time the 
wind rises above Force One, 
but giving the added advan- 
tage of producing very posi- 
tive psychic responses in 
male customers. 

The MPs pour themselves 
Into these frocks and then 
vacuum-seal them by a 
remarkable process which 
most human women (and 
men) would give their eyeteeth 
to discover. As lights are defi- 
nitely OUT less practised MPs 
cover all exposed limbs with a 
dark brown varnish, courtesy 



of R&D. Those who are really 
skilled at holding their shape 
wear stockings, a feat beyond 
mosl MPs (and many humans) 
because the suspender bell 
cuts through them tike 
cheesewire. Their faces are 
held in place by liberal appli- 
cations of make-up, applied 
with a plastering trowel and 
removabie only by pneumatic 
drill. A few enterprising MPs, 
trying for the 'natural' look 
use R&D'S varnish Instead, 
not generally a good idea, 
since It tends to emphasis the 
flakiness of their synthsskin, 
which is forever peeling off. 



MARKETING 
The Executive 

Distinguishing Marks 

There is really only one sure 
way of telling one MP from 
another — their cars. Cars are 
THE status symbol among MPs, 
and give a cast iron indication of 
their placing in the MP hierarchy. 

The Executive MP drives a 
Granada 2-litr© GL, II she's been 
with her company for some time 
and has Proved Her Worth, she 
will have a car phone. If she's 
Proved Her Worth And Then 
Some, she will have a car fax. 
Very occasionally, she will have 
the Managing Director as well 
(this is known as 'insurance'). 

Habitat 

The EM P has a nice little house 
somewhere in the suburbs, 

which she shares with two cats 
(special agents for MP 
Infiltration), a budgie, and an 



TYPE#1: 



endiess string of human males 
whose Reality noticeably 
decreases as her's increases. 
The smaller bedroom is devoted 
exclusively to clothes which she 
will cheerfully lend to less fortu- 
nate colleagues (dark glasses 
supplied) and the box room 
holds 47 pairs of shoes and 
three large shelves full o! make- 
up and varnish (labelled Kwik- 
Tan}. 

At her office, she has a Very 
Nice Desk with an Extremely 
Comfortable swivel chair where 
she sits to do her nails Her 
phone rings constantly and her 
human colleagues have been 
known to comment on the . 
remarkable, almost magical, 
way her paperwork {of which 
there is vast quantities) gets 
down (not as magical as it 
seems — R&D send in the 
Special Support Squad every 
night to do it for her). 



62TGM TX022:9-89 




Marketing 



Behavioural Patterns 



EMPs spend a lot of time at par- 
ties (often called Trade Shows), 
wtiere they meet lots and lots of 
people and make tots and lots 
oii'iends. all oi whom believe in 
them implicitly and do wonders 
for their Reality. 

As befits her senior standing, 
the EMP has been given the 
best possible equipment by MP 
R&D. She can choose her per- 
sonality from a wide selection 
ranging tram Coolly Efficient 
through Bubbly to Delightfully 
Flustered. She has been provid- 
ed with an impressive string of 
qualifications from Heal human 
educational establishments, 
some ol which she has actually 
attended, and has even been 
granted enough intelligence to 
be able to take an interest in 
computer games. EMPs who 
have Proved Their Worth And 
Then Some will even be able to 
PLAY the games they promote, 
and, m truly exceptional cases 
have been Known TO PLUG 
THE JOYSTICK INTO THE 
RIGHT PORT It is even 
rumoured, though this may be 
fallacious, that one EMP has 
mastered the concept ot raster 
lines. 

Atypical EMP phone conver- 
sation will run like this: 



To a Distributor; Helloooo, 
Sweetie. Cherub, I've go a 
Wonderful New Game for you. 
You'll love it. No. it isn't finished 
— but its going to be released 
next wee*;. Darling, I'd love to 
show it to you, but you know 
how it is... yes. it's got a bug. 
No, no, just a teensy one; a little 
hiccup with the player controls... 
a live-minute job, thafs all, 
Naughty, that's what you said at 
the parry. Mm mm mm... THAT 
party ... Sweetie Angel, about 
that little favour you owe me... 
five thousand units of each for- 
mat? Darling, that's wonderful. 
We must gel together again 
sometime Byeeee ...' 

To the Press: Oh, go on... 
give us a gold star. We haven't 
had one all year, Go on.,. I know 
you haven't seen the game, but 
it doesn't matter, reaily, it's won- 
derful. Yes, I promise you it is. 
Go on. give us a gold star, I'll be 
incredible grateful. It really is a 
fabulous game. Yes, of course it 
scrolls. No, the music isn't in yet, 
but it's going to be marvellous... 
yes, really Oh, I hat's just what 
you said at the party, 
Mmmmmm... THAT party. Yes, it 
was, wasn't it? You will? Oh, 
that's fantastic. And 90% for the 
music? You're wonderful. We 
must do il again sometime! 
Byeeee...' 



MARKETING PEOPLETTE TYPE #2: 
The WYSIWYG 



Distinguishing Marks 

II the WMP has Proved Her 
Worth, she drives a Sierra 
Sapphire. If she hasn't, she gets 
a Fiesta. Very occasionally, she 

will have to share a pool car, or 
does without one altogether 
(this is called "telephone sales'}. 

Habitat 

The WMP is very, very com- 
mon, throughout the games 
software industry. Any given 
company will have at least five 
bmes more WMPs than they 
actually need, and nobody will 
be able to tell you why or when 
they were taken on. Presumably 
they had a function at one time, 
but no-One can quite remember 
what it is anymore. After all, 
they've probably been with the 
company for at least six months, 
and now they're there, you're 
stuck with them. 

They flit around the office 
looking terribly serious or terribly 
bubbly, depending which per- 
sonality RAD have allotted 
ihern. Having no clearly defined 
job, they tend to move around 
from desk to desk impartially, 
doing whatever comes to hand 
— whether ft be manning recep- 



tion or talking to customers or 
the press. Some say this is 
because they're multitalenled. 
Cynics say it's because they 
don't know which desk is actual- 
ly theirs. 

All this arises because MP 
RAD's resources are limited. 
and so they only equip the 
WMPs with the minimum need- 
ed to establish them in Reality. 
Homes they don't get. having to 
make do with elaborate cover 
stones and a decommissioned 
gas tank which they share with 
up to 3000 other WMPs and 
where they go to swap WMP- 
type stores and float around out 
of their skulls (and the rest of 
their bodies) to get away from it 
all. 

Behavioural Patterns 

WMPs deal with the nitty-gritty 
of marketing games software. 
This explains an awful lot about 
the industry as a whole- 
Desperate to be as Real as 
possible on the limited 
resources provided them by MP 
R&D, WMPs spend most of their 
time selling themselves rather 
selling their product to increase 
their Reality quotient. 
They go to a lot of parties and 



get very buddy-buddy with 
senior executives and anybody 
of any importance whatsoever. 
They spend a lot ol time working 
on their cover stories which 
must be as eventful as possible 
to get attention. WMPs are 
therefore always divorced, or 
getting divorced, or having a 
simply terrible time with their 
boyfriend. They spend terribly 
long periods of time telling all 
these stories to anyone who has 
the strength to listen. They have 
pet names for everybody and 
develop enchanting little catch- 
phrases (Such as 'Wotcher 
Mate r "Brillo' and Gosh, Mega) 
to use on the phone so that they 
can be identified among the 
common herd, Even so, WMPs 
have a disconcerting habit of 
flicking out of existence at cru- 
cial moments never to return, 
just because everyone has 
momentarily forgotten who they 
are, Sadly, it usually takes sev- 
eral weeks for anyone to notice 
that they've gone, if they ever 
do. 

These huge efforts of concen- 
tration leave very little over for 
the software side ol things. Most 
WMPs are convinced that all 
computer games are tapes' {as 
anyone who has ever had to 



correct their playing instructions 
or copyright notices will con- 
firm). Disks are something they 
have in their backs which I hey 
take to a Very Nice Young Man 
called an Osteo- something -or- 
other to get massaged, after 
which they go for drinkies with 
him. 

Before they show a game to 
anyone they play if lor at ieast 
five minutes so that they can tell 
them all about it, and they draw 
up handy little press releases 
which list all the wonderful fea- 
tures of their wonderful product 
(usually dragged out of a hap- 
less programmer at knifepoint). 
The more competent ones will 
be sent out to demonstrate the 
games. A nightmare for all con- 
cerned, since as far as WMPs 
are concerned, loading is some- 
thing that happens to lorries out- 
side the warehouse when 
they've sold the product, or, 
even better, what they get in the 
bar after work:. 

Other Remarks 

If you wan I to hit a WMP where 

it realty hurts, jusl mention the 
Kent Team. She probably tost 
70% of her sales to them last 
year. 



MARKETING PEOPLETTE TYPE #3: 
The Male 



Distinguishing Marks 

A rare fish, this, readily identifi- 
able because he wears trousers 
and NO MAKE-UP WHATSO- 
EVER, 

He does, of course, use var- 
nish {ultra dark) on all areas not 
covered by his carefully casual 
suit. Because it's harder to be a 
Male MP than a female, he car- 
ries a Psion Organiser to remind 
him who he is. He has very, very 
white synthateeth that look very, 
very good against his very, very 
dark synthaskin, and does 
toothpaste ads in his spare time. 

He drives Granada Oft* BMW 
and ALWAYS has a car phone. 
He usually has personalised 
number plates, too. 

Habitat 

The MMP has an OFFICE. It is 
always, but always, the biggest, 
comfiest gadgetiest and BEST 
in the entire company. The MD's 
office cannot compare; the 
MMP's has deeper pile carpets, 
bigger filing cabinets, comfier 
chairs with more hydraulics than 
an oil well, and his own coffee 
machine (called 'my secretary'). 
The front of his desk (real black 
wood, not MFI plasti-ash) is 
tastefully decorated with a bat- 



tery of telephones in glorious 
techoicolour, only one ol which 
is actually connected to any- 
thing. He is a Master of Reality 
and has a Very High Profile. He 
can also convince people that; 

1 . He is what he says he is. 

2. Can do his job. 

3. Is worth every penny the 
company forks oul for his ser- 
vices. 

He's also a sweet talker. 

Behavioural Patterns 

The MMP has an Attitude 
Problem. It works like this... 
Totally dedicated to selling 
himself ... errr, his product, and 
having been blessed with male- 
ness by R&D, he has to prove 
he can sell more, better and 
faster than all those dam' 
females out there. The best way 
to do this is to have the Best 
Product In The World, or at leasi 
lo convince everyone that he 
has it, Being such a sweet talker 
he also convinces himself that 
he has the 9esl Product In The 
World. It's a logical conclusion, 
then, that anyone who doesn't 
want to buy it is totally out of 
their tree and not worth bother 
mg about- His less-than-tactful 
expression of this point of view 
to his customers has frequently 
led to his being requested, or 



TGM TX 022:9-89 63 



even assisted, lo leave the 
premises try the said customers. 
His survival instincts, howev- 
er, are well-developed. He 
knows he s got to keep Hie 
women down, because if he 
doesn't he's going to be out of a 
job and out of Reality PDQ — 
nobody is more aware than he 
that the little darlings are just 
waiting for a chance to get their 
little knives in his back, their 
nails in his eyes and their back- 
sides on his chair — perma- 
nently. So he butters them up 
like crazy and makes sure that 
each one of them knows that 
she is absolutely the only girl in 
his life, the instant any of them 
gets halfway towards promotion 
and quarter-way towards his 
job, he utters the memorable 
phrase Baby you're unReal", 
whereupon she vanishes 



through the dimensional inter- 
face in a puff of vapouhsed 
Kwik-Tan. 

Other Remarks 

The MMP is paranoid about his 
publicity material^ Only HE can 
give it out, because, he figures, 
only HE should receive the grati- 
tude of the customers for such 
largess, So he seals the tops of 
all his boxes of T-shirts, posters 
and freebie lancky bars with 
yards and yards of parcel tape, 
signed in triplicate and pad- 
locked, The latest craze among 
EMPs and WMPs is seeing who 
can get the most goodies out of 
the bottom of these boxes, and 
then betting on how long the 
MMP will spend on his Psion 
Organiser trying to work out if he 
miscounted- 





MARKETING PEOPLETTE TYPE #4: 
The Human 

Distinguishing Marks Behavioural Patterns 



Male or female, the odd one of 
these does stray into the busi- 
ness from time to time, general- 
ly by mistake or because they're 
related to the MD and he wants 
them off the dole queue. 
MALE — Wears a baggy com- 
pany T-shirt, stone washed 
jeans, laded sweaiers, trainers 
and a bewildered expression, 
He is frequently mistaken for a 
programmer, which is what hed 
really like to have been, if only 
he could have worked out the 
difference between Return and 
Enter. 

FEMALE — She's not blonde, 
not slim, and couldn't have fitted 
inlo an MP-type frock at five 
years old. let alone 25. This is 
not saying that she doesn't try: if 
everybody else around the 
place is wearing them, she fig- 
ures, she ought to as well. The 
result of this philosophy can be 
interesling. if somewhat less 
than decorative. 

Both male and female HMPs 
drive clapped -out Rovers with 
Ihe left wing bashed in. 

Habitat 

HMPs have HOMES. Unlike 
everyone else in the games 
software industry, they actually 

go to Ihem. In fact, they spend 
more time at home than at work 
— or at least, more time some- 
where than at work, HMPs, you 
see, have Private Lives, and 
when they're not living them 
somewhere, they're sleeping off 
the after -effects. When they do 
show up at the office they can 
generally be found on a shelf in 
the warehouse, snoring happily. 



HMPs shift an awful lot of stack, 
This is largely because they go 
to an awful lot of the Right Kind 
of Parties, meet an awful lot of 
Fun People and generally have 
a Good Time. They don't give a 
hoot about their product so long 
as they get their wage-packet on 
lime and are about as dedicated 
as an Amiga. Customers buy 
from them out of sheer relief — 
they know a Real Person when 
they meet one. 

The major part of MP R&D's 
resources are now committed to 
finding out how HMPs do it so 
they can do it too. They are 
already educating all MPs in the 
art of dancing on tables at large 
parties, since the rousing suc- 
cess of certain HMPs who used 
This ploy at the industry Dinner 
and other related functions. R&D 
have further concluded lhal 
dancing on tables is even more 
effective if accompanied by the 
removal of certain articles of 
clothing and the consumption of 
large quantities of alcohol, not 
necessarily in that order. All MPs 
are being instructed to practise 
this technique whenever possi- 
ble, 

Other Remarks 

Will the In Din tables take the 
strain? 

The characters in this article 
are based on no particular per- 
son or persons. No harm is 
intended. 

MORE IN THIS 
OCCASIONAL SERIES 
SOON... 




Standard Games are one ot the 
fastest growing companies at 
the moment, They combine 
high quality product with a 
friendly service. Mutant Wars is 
among the batch of their most 
recent releases. The game is a 
computer- moderated wargame, 
designed to give fast action and 
excitement, Each game has 25 
mutated players battling it out 
over a map of 30x30 squares, 
Mutant Wars is set in a post- 
nuclear war era. with the radia 
tion having caused horrific 
effects. Now, a few generations 
later, these mutations are so 
varied as to have not just dif^ 
ferent appearances 
but different 
and talents, Some 
can fly, others 
can turn invisi 
ble, some can 
even photo- 
sy nthesise! 
This all adds 
up to make a 
tun wargame 
which would be 
an ideal introduc 
tion to play by mail 
As a special dea 
TGM readers you can get the 
colour boxed start-up absolute- 
ly free! Further turns cost £2 (or 
£3 in the later stages}, 

Also from Standard Games is 
Adventurer Kings, an epic 
game of adventure and imperial 
conquest. You play an elf, 
dwarf, ore or human- and must 
wield your armies to become 
the ultimate victor over 11 other 
players, Magic, hidden lairs, 
monsters, unique worlds for 
every game and 1 b army types, 
make this a very exciling fanta- 
sy wargame. Adventurer Kings 
is more expensive at £6 for 
your start-up (which includes 
your first two turns) and E3 for 
further turns Computer owners 
can also send in disks or play 
by electronic mail, 

Ghostbusters 

A new hand -moderated game 
has been launched by Temple 
Games In Gothick you play an 
investigator for the Institute of 
Paranormal Research. Just 




After last month's intro- 
duction to the world of 
PBM, John R Woods 
looks at a bevy of fasci- 
nating releases and 
starts with a peek at 
two news games from 
Standard... 

suppose that Frankenstein and 
Dracuia existed — that 
Lovecraft's horrors really 
stalked the Earth.. Just sup- 
pose that they still do... When 
strange things occur and the 
police are baffled, the IPR 
steps in. Leads may include 
newspaper reports, or stolen 
files, with which you must track 
your way to solve the mystery, 
This is a very original looking 
game that looks like good solid 
fun, and with start-up at £3 
(includes two turns), and fur- 
ther fees at £1.75 it's reason- 
able priced 

Legacy of the Panther is 
the first game from 
West Pennine 

Games, and play- 
ers initial reac- 
tions have been 
Favourable. It's 
a wargame set 
in Ihe Empire 
of the Panther 
a fantasy 

land), with a 
frantic struggle 
become 
Emperor, You are 
one of Ihe hundred or 
so remaining Area 

Commanders of the old 
empire. Starting with a small 
force and limited resources you 
must impose your will over the 
surrounding areas by invasion 
or other means. Whether you 
are a tyrant or benefactor is up 
to you. Vou may choose to fur- 
ther the aims for the old 
empire, or attempt to go it 
alone outside its borders. Each 
turn you get to fill oul up to 25 
orders, for just £1 a turn, And 
TGM readers can get their first 
turn and start-up absolutely 
free 1 

Taking place in a pyramid. 
Pyraglyphics. from Chepro, is 
an adventure game for up to 40 
players, Each challenge >s set 
in a different pyramid, with 
players competing to ascend 
the levels before I hey dissolve 
from beneath them! There are 
scrolls to read, chests to open, 
weapons to wield and strange 
articles to puzzle over. The 
game changes as it continues. 



64 TGM TXG22:9-89 






Play By Mail 





so don't forget to explore and 
map each level. Start-up costs 
£3.50 (includes three turns). 
Subsequent turns are 

90p*1 .20/E1 .50 accord 
ing Id the number 
actions in 
open-ende 
game, with a 
fixed £1.20, 
charge in th 
d e a d I i n e dl 
game. Thel 
rulebook can 1 
also be pur- 
chased at £1 
Overall the gam 
looks fairly simple 
and may lack lasting 
appeal, although it's 
good introduction game. 

How to PBM 

Carol and Ken Mulhalland, of 
Time Patterns, have come up 
with a PBM first. Their book is 
eniilled Games Mastership — 
How to Design and Run a PBM 
Game. The tome stretches to warrior with 
125 pages and contains 
numerous quotes from the pro- 
fessionals, The book cowers 
definitions of types of games, 
the game design, how to 
organise your firm in terms of 
lime, costing, equipment, staff 
etc, marketing your game, and 
relating to the players. Overall 
the book is a real credit to the 
authors, being both compre- 
hensive and well written. If 
you're thinking of taking the 
plunge irtio GMing then this will 
be an invaluable guide at only 
£5.50. 

MJR Games have been 
around in PBM for a couple of 
years now with their popular 
roleplaying game Raiders of 
Gwaras Mike Richards, their 
boss, has taken the plunge and 
employed his first Games 
Master to run a new world 
using the same system, 
Yshkar. It's a strange world with 
Dragon Riders. winged 
baboons, lizard men and 
humans, all competing to domi- 
nate. Play one of these forms, 
develop your character and 
exploit its strengths. Turns are 
lengthy at about two typed 
pages, which more than justi- 
fies the turn fee of £2. and a 
rulebook lor £5, 

At this point I thought itd be 
a good idea to give players 
some hints on roleplaying in 
PBM games. I remember the 
first time I tried out one of these 
games, and to be honest I was 
a bit lost! 

In most roleplaying PBM 
games you take on the role of a 



character in some sort of fanta- 
sy land. Each turn you must 
detail the actions of your char- 
acter, and the GM will decide 
how the actions went and 
ive you a storyline to 
follow and use next 
turn. The object 
of roleplaying 
isn't as dear 
ut as in a 
power game. 
You're not nec- 
essarily aiming 
to become 

numera uno, but 
erely to develop 
your character, and 
fun! Good role- 
playing can give great sat- 
isfaction, perhaps more so than 
any other types of game. 

So how is good roleplaying 
achieved? For starters you want 
to think carefuily about your 
character, and decide exactly 
what he's like Many go for the 
stereotyped 'huge barbarian 
a massive axe', 
while others may prefer the 
more subtle {and perhaps more 
challenging) 'young man with 
spectacles, who appreciates art. 
However, he has an unfortunate 
drug addiction which is growing 
daily and his local supplier is 
manipulating him as part of a 
large fraud operation. These 
are, of course, just examples, 
but let your imagination work in 
overdrive and try to come up 
with a deep 1 character — 
someone who isn't just a series 
of statistics for strength, agility 
etc. Having done this the role- 
playing becomes much easier. 

In most of the roleplaying 
games on the market the GM 
will try to lead you to where 
action may be found, or gentle 
leads to what you're looking for. 
The type of these will vary from 
game to game. Some games 
ar^ more combat-orientated — 
the leads will be reports of bat- 
tles or where treasure can be 
found. In other games these 
leads may be you overhearing 
thieves talk of their next job. or 
even more mundane things 
such as a bar job vacancy that's 
going (always a good place to 
hear what's going on). In filling 
in your turnsheet you may 
decide to follow up some 
rumour you overheard, or, per- 
ish the thought, totally ignore 
them and come Up with your 
own scheme — the choice is all 
yours. 

Turnsheets are arranged in 
different ways, but they usually 
give you space to enter a series 
of instructions for a period of 



time. Try to justify your actions 
as to how your character would 
really react. If you're playing a 
wimp who's never done any- 
thing brave in his life, don't 
make him take on a bunch of 
muggers — perhaps more real 
isticaliy he'd faint, and they'd 
rob him blind! It's often a good 
move to also detail some of the 
emotions and thoughts your 
character is going through — 
these add enjoyment for the 
GM and let him see that you're 
trying hard to make the most of 
the game. GM's love enthusias- 
tic players. 

Finally, quite often an action 
will fail, and you don't really 
want to waste a whole turn 
because of this. For this reason 
its a good idea to give the GM 
options, If It's sunny (71 stay on 
the stall aJI day, and pick the 
pocket of any helpless looking 
individuals, but if it's rainy I'll go 
into the bar and drown my sor- 
rows. One last piece of advice 
— have fun. If you don't you 



shouldn't be playing! Good 
luck. 

And on that note another col- 
umn comes to an end. As I've 
said before, please send in 
your views on the column and 
PBM in general to 
PBM Update, TGM, PO Box 
10, Ludlow, Shropshire SYS 
1DB. 



CONTACTS 

Standard Games (TGM): 
Arlon House, Station 
Road, Kings Lang ley, 
Herts WD4 8LF. 
Temple Games: PO Box 
XG7. LeedsLSUBXJ. 
West Pennine Games: 
Dept TGM, 15 Carr Bank 
Drive, Ramsbottom, Bury, 
Lanes BL0 9DG. 
Time Patterns: 9? 
Devonshire Road, 
Birmingham B20 2PG 
Chepro Ltd: 6 Gran ton 
Gardens, Edinburgh EDS 
1AX, 

MJR Games: 43 Cromwell 
Ave, W ha I ley Range, 
Manchester M16. 





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TGM TX 022:9-89 65 



Master of the universe 



Space Master — 

* _ . n dice roll — tl the dice score is 

Roleplaying Game est^'^ 1 "^ 

Iron Crown Enterprises (121.96) £?*££, T In* 

— Dace Master is a I pie of pages into Ih8 Space high, the re-roliing continues, 

descendant ol another Master rules the reader is Similarly if a roll is very low 



RPG Role Master uncompromising statements traded from it. In this way it is 

{itself a relative of trie that would battle any begin- occasionally possible for 

roleplaying game of the ■ ners. scores greatly outsidei he nor- 

Tolkien universe. Middle The rules, once you get lo mal range. So even the most 




ZX«^ A needed. Space Master does parts ol the whole game are not as data led a, the amaz- 
and mingle sc. u win Taniasy _ fr ^ uen1 reference to the extensive critical hit and mg Near Star Atlas in 2300 



The character skill system Is a graphic detail the effects ol Space Master It complex 



'£$4 concept ol games like appallingly bad dice rolls. For ! rules syslem i 5 n t as stream- 
<S§5 Dungeons and Dragons and example: Several strikes take , lined as it could be. but it 



to describe the vari- drops" is one result. | bined directly with the Role 

ous abilities ol individuals in After character generation Master fantasy rules but 



such as 'first aid, communica- 
tions and hyperspace piloting 
to such varied fields as 
anthropology, caving, medita- 
tion and, of course, seduction! 
As in DSD, a character 
improves attributes by gaining 
experience points, which 



remainder ol the general rule 
system and then gives a com- 
prehensive section covering 
possible psionic powers, such 
as telekenesis and telepathy. 
The booh concludes with a ref- 
erence section and index. 
The GM book contains 



titled Star Strike, that allows 
players to use their Space 
Master characters as pilots or 
gunners. The level of back- 
ground inlormation Included 
on a whole range of future 
technology and the wide vari- 
ety ot skills available to play- 



setting you 



everyone will like 



gamers will want to pay, ' receives a comparatively targe verse of Frank Herberts Dune. 



■,/UfJVi. inuiJi^ ' ■*-■■ ■—■■—■•■■■■-• -— ■- -m- - - - 

ED! The three rulebooks in 
the boxed set confront the 



pages of densely-packed rule 
descriptions, charts and 
tables. The emphasis is very 
much on detail and ease of 
reference for experienced 



first ot the three rulebooks 
deals with the system of 
character generation, combat 
rules and character skills. 
Whereas many games would 
include a leisurely introduc- 
tion to general roleplaying 



but the character wilt learn j a historical Introduction to the 
less bv doina the same thing formation of the Empire and 



less point! 

Once a sufficient number of 
points have been collected the 
character can advance to a 
higher experience level. Unlike 

xh no n n.ietAm tho charac- 



ter's player can choose the 
precise skill benefits that this 
improvement leads to, picking 
particular abilities to increase 
and so allowing the character 
to specialise In whatever way 
is desired. 



with an introductory adven- 
ture. 

Last ot the set is the Tech 
book, which details the varied 



the Space Master system. 
Everything your character 
could possible need is here, 
with weapons, robots and 
androids of every shape and 
form* plus more mundane 
items like clothing, medical 




66 TGM TX0229-89 
















THE HITS 

1986-1988 




SANXION 





DELTA 








QUE-DEX HUNTER'S MOON HAWKEYE ARMALYTE 



?iii sma si l hits b J m ^ n 9 you the very best from Thalamus' first two years. These games are so 

«& £,t< C ar &TSI1 awa # s # an w . e < an mwtojf her .5 : Sillers. Gold Medals, Screen Stars. Si 
Stars, Hits, ACE Rated ... It s the ultimate collection this year! 



hot 

Super 



CBM 64/128 CASSETTE £12.99 DISKETTE £17.99 



Mail Order: fend cteqw or posl THALAMUS, 1 SATURN HOUSE, CALLEVA PARK, ALDERMA5TON, BERKS RC7 4Q>V ®0734 fll 72&1 





OUR MAN IN 



Welcome back. I'd like to start 
this month with some news that 
may prompt all you PC Engine 
owners to go out and buy a CO 
ROW unit. Hudson, the makers 
ol R-Type, are considering cere- 
leasing R-Type, bul this time on 
the CD ROW. They say that this 
way they wilt be abie to get all 
the original sound trom the 
arcade machine plus the whole 
game onto one CD. This woufd 
seem pointless, however, con- 
sidenng that almost all PC 
Engine owners would already 
undoubtedly have, or at least 
played, the original near-periecl 
conversion. 
A much better way of using 



Is the Game Boy 
already doomed? 
Why Is a randy 
comic strip turn 
ing into a com- 
puter game? 
Keeping an eye 
on the future 
often means 
keeping an eye 
on the continent. 

Shintaro 
Kanaoya reports 
on ail that's new 
and lively In con- 
sole-orientated 
Japan. 




the CD ROM would seem to be 
for Altered Beast mentioned 
last month, which will be 
released on both ROW! card and 
CD. It looks as though the CD 
version will be a helluva lot bet- 
ter 

The CD version comes out a 
month earlier and includes all 
the demo and music from the 
arcade machine. It'll also be 
around £5 cheaper. ROM card 
owners definitely lose out — but 
when you pay almost £200 for a 
CD-ROM unit, you expect better 
quality. 

On the subject of price, ersl- 
while Japanese PM, Mr 
Takeshita, imposed a new tax 
on almost all items in Japan, 
This, of course, includes com- 
outers and their related Items, 
Therefore prices will go up. But 
don't worry. The tax rate is a 
mere 3% whtoh, considering 
income tax has been towered 
and that Britain's VAT, is a stag- 
gering 15%, there isn't really 
much to worry about. Games 
will go up by roughly 70p and 
the PC Engine by about £3. 

Back to far more interesting 
items- Mahjong. the popular 



Chinese game played by tour 
players, in which tiles bearing 
various designs are drawn and 
discarded until one player has 
an entire hand, will be brought 
to the Engine under the guise of 
Mahjoryg School Not very rele- 
vant here except that this game 
contains a novel twist. Using 
the age-old favourites sex 'n" 
violence this is a bil like strip 
poker, except with mahjong. 
These have been hugely popu- 
lar in arcades, lurking guiltily at 
the back. The violence? Thai is 
provided by playing a male 
computer opponent. When you 
wm, you see a close-up of his 
face and a fist go crashing into 
it At the end, he looks worse 
than Rocky at the end of said 
film (or, I guess, even at the 
beginning), 

Still wtth the PC Engine. 
which is gradually taking over 
where Nintendo 8 -bits seem to 
be trailing off, you can expect 
the release of these games 
soon: Jack Nickfaos Golf. 
Wonder Boy 3: Monster Land 
(CD only), Shinobi, Power Drift, 
Knight Rider Special — basical- 
ly the Nintendo version on the 



Engine — and Xewous 2. 

The conversion of City 
Hunter is one that I am desper 
ate to see. It's based on a 
comic character who is tabu 
lously awesome with his 
favourite weapon, the Colt 
Python, good ai fighting a no 
as cool as ice. Like The 
Equalizer, but younger, he 
advertises to solve problems, 
but most of the lime ends up 
body-guarding bodies of very 
attractive young women. 

The comic art is superb and 
the humour nsque. I'll be Irf 
ested to see whether the ; 
grammers have managec 
convey the feel of the comic 
book on the TV ecr« 
Hunter is the randiest thing on 
two legs and if it wears a at 
you wont see him for dust. He 
also possesses a rather large 
backside which is so powert 
can stop the many blows he 
receives. It's currently running 
Japan's most popular weekly: 
it you see a volume ol the col 
tected stories in any Japanese 
book shop, like OCS in London, 
BUY IT. You will die laughing, I 
guarantee. By the way a con- 



68 TGM TX022:9~89 



JAPAN 




leiin 



. mm I 




p ii>K citing action from Double Dragon 
tenOw left: Evert and Lendl in World 
joCand Super Wonder Boy 2 



-l 






version of the arcade game, 
Aforrwe Robo Kid is also 

plan: ■ 

The Nintendo refuses to die 
gratefully. Two big games this 
summer are Dragon's Quest 4. 
known in the US as Dragon 
Warrior, and Nintendo s biggie. 
Mother. Guess whaf? It's an an 
RPG God give me strength. 

Hostages, p'anned tor 
November, looks ho-hum. 
Double Dragon 2, however, is a 
different kettle of piranhas 
entirety. The original, would you 
believe, was one-player, 
Amazing how companies just 
forget a game's greatest 
strength. DD2 is, thankfully, 
two-player and looks like what 
DO should have been. In 
Japan, a December release. 

Some of you may have heard 
of Juzo Kami, a Japanese direc- 
tor whose films include 
Tampopo [Japanese for dande 
Hon,, and a very weird hit film 
last year) and A Taxing 
Woman. The latter is to be con- 
verted to the Nintendo. Bet you 
can't wail. 

Far more exciting is 
RoboCop. With perhaps some 



Dt the besi Nintendo graphics 
ever, the game looks to be an 
arcade beater. Similar in style to 
the arcade. Robo can now 
punch, crouch, defend and use 
three types of gun. A target 
practice scene is also present. 
This may prompt you, if you 
have a Nintendo, to blow the 
dust ofi it and play RoboCop, I 
wouldn't expect a British 
release until at least the next 
Mars Olympics. Still, you can 
always hope, 

Finally on the Nintendo, 
there's World Super Tennis 
which features two players who 
probably hoped to go further 
than the semi-finals at 
Wimbledon, Chris Evert and 
Ivan Lendl. Also expect: 
Sp!atter-Hous9 which looks 
strangely cute; Top Gun; The 
Second Mission: and Mote 
Killing. Regarding the iatter. you 
may have seen these strange 
machines in Britain where little 
plastic moles pop up and you 
hit them with a plastic hammer 
(RSPCA be alerted). The 
Nintendo version uses a mat. 
not unlike the Family Trainer 
(the mat which you ran on and 
a little man ran on the screen, 
remember?) A hammer is also 
provided, for cruel and sadistic 
mole crushing. 

At the recent Tokyo Toy 
Show, like everywhere else, 
hand-helds were the order of 
the day, Konami, strong 
Nintendo supporter and cre- 
ators of Nemesis and other 
great games, are releasing a 
bevy of games tor their hand- 
held: Confra {Gryzor), Top Gun, 
Nemesis. Double Dribble. 
Gtadius, Skate of Die and 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 
{nice title). Despite being in 
colour, I he graphics are simple, 
with each one dedicated to one 
game. Sega's hand-helds 
Super Hang On, Thunder 
Blade and Kamov were also 
there, under the title of the 
Game Vision Senes. {Some of 
these are available in the UK at 
places like Dixorts.) 

On the now-supposedly- 
doomed Game Boy are Soko- 
Ban and Hyper Lode Runner. 
Oldies but shining goldies. 
especially nowadays, while wait- 
ing for a train Apart from those 
puzzle games; Goif. Motccross 
Maniacs, and Battleships. With 
the two-player link, the latter 
could be tremendous fun, 

Also at the Show was a string 




of new, and eagerly-awaited, 
PC Engine peripherals. All carry 
the 'booster' suffix on the end; 
they include an lllustbooster 
(illustration). Printbooster, a 
printer with a memory of 
Japanese AND Chinese char- 
acters, so it doubles as a mini 
word processor. Actually I'd bet- 
ter explain this. 

In Japan,, we use Chinese 
characters as well as two basic 
alphabets of 50 letters each. 
There are over 6Q0Q characters 
that are known as Kanjt. 
Because a typewriter couid not 
have 7000 keys or even 50 tor 
the basic set (not even in 
Japan!), our typewriters use the 
same keys as English typewrit- 
ers — giving two basic charac- 
ters on each key (2x26 ' 52). So 
when you type in a word, the 
word processor displays or 
screen a selection of Kanji thai 
can be used for that word. You 
then choose the correct one 
and you're oft, It may seem 
complicated, but once familiar 
with the system, it's pretty easy. 

The lllustbooster and the 
Printbooster are collectively 
known as the Core Unit, and 
are actually a graphics tablet 
and printer Also stuck in the 



Dangerous, randy 
tunny and pos- 
sessed of the most 
poiwerful back- 
side, the City 
Hunter — hero of 
the Japanese hit 
comic — is making 
his way onto com- 
puter soon 



pipeline is a modem; plans are 
for, global games playing, 
ordering shopping (just like in 
Son Son it, but in real tile), and 
checking on those all-important 
share prices. The PC Engine, 
your complete family manage- 
ment machine. You need never 
walk out of the house again 

As detailed last month, 
Hudson's battery backup sys 
tem looks set to be called The 
Voice of Heaven 2, {I must have 
missed the first one.) NEC are 
rumoured to be making their 
own one. The name? The (bor- 
ing) Backup Booster, 

And that is almost it, except 
that Afterburner may come out 
on the CD ROM-based, FM 
Towns (at around £1.600 you 
won't see me buying one for 
review!). Next month, I'll be out 
on the streets of Japan, compil- 
ing the biggest Japanese report 
for the bestest mag. 
Unfortunately, Hi have to make 
room for Marshal Moneybert' 
Rosenthal in next issue, as he 
brings you his eight-page sup- 
plement on American develop- 
ments. So expect the complete 
guide to shopping in Jap 
Issue 24, Travel the world with 
The Games Machine, and. till 
next we meet, sayonara. 




TGM TX 022:9-89 69 





**fc 



i*. *Wi ^ ^ 4 flrt r eft*?? 









hil sequel to one of the all time 
computer £3me greats! 

The search for the evil Drax continuesH 
Now the Bartsarfan and the Prince** 
fight their wav past dozen* of 
incredible monsters, through a maie 
of caves and dungeons. 

Available Now on Amiga, Atari ST and 
IBM PC. 



&HWM 



WirAtfm (km 








hi* . *W*** l**^e * **£ 







•OPTWAUR 






#&(k&©ia 




Competition 



DOUBLE VISION 



I 




Win the original artwork for Xybots 



Just take a look at the illustration on this 
page, Seem familiar? Well, it's the art- 
work to Tengen/Dom ark's latest hit 
game, Xybots. However, you'll have 
never seen artwork like this before, 
because just before the artwork pictured 
here was used, Domark decided to 
change the brief far top artist Steiner 
Lund. The characters in the final artwork, 
as seen in the Domark advertisement, 
are actually firing out of the picture. 

So. as you can imagine, the original 
Steiner Lund artwork is a real collectors' 
item. And, as a TGM reader, you stand a 



high chance of winning this superb, 
framed picture, based on last issue's hit 
Tengen coin-op conversion Just answer 
the three questions below, and you could 
have the delightful artwork hanging on 
your living room wall, 

1 What was Domark's first ever game? 

a) Star Wars; 

b) Friday the 13th: 

c) Eureka, 

2 What is Domarks latest puzzle game? 

a) Trivial Pursuit; 

b) Pictionary; 

c) Monopoly, 



3 What partnership appear in Xybots? 

a) Laurel and Hardy; 

b) Gunn and Roses; 

c) Hardy and Gunn, 

Send your answers on the back of a 
postcard to EX WHY BOTS Comp, TGM, 
PO Box 10, Ludlow. Shropshire SYS 
1DB, First-prize winner will receive the 
original, framed artwork by Steiner Lund, 
and ten mnners-up each win a copy of 
Xybots on their format (please specify 
cassette or disk), Entries in by 14 
September 







TGM TX 022:9-89 71 




"Hot Wire is to 
macro pro- 
grams what a 
Ferrari is to a 
baby's 
buggy" 



Pho-tograptis by 
Marshal M Rosenthal 



Speeding up your St 
Is easy with the Jato 
Accelerator board 
(fight), although at 
the expense of your 
warranty, and a 
Stateside rarity — Da 
Vinci Designer 
(below), an art utility 
with some superb 
and nifty new fea- 
tures such as stencil 



SHOWDOWN 



In America computer shows are as regular as Phil 
Donahue shows, and it's hard to keep track of them all. 
Marshal M Rosenthal sends this report on the latest 
Stateside Atari shows (yes, TWO!), The ST gets super- 
charged, multitasked and reveals its 4096 colours, 
while the old Atari XE/XL receives an amazing graphics 
cartridge. 



Lite can be confusing. A few years 
ago, some of the best games were 
being produced in the States, while 
great productivity and business 
programs hailed from Britain, 
Germany and France, among oth- 
ers, Today finds most of the games 
coming from Europe, while 
American developers seem to be 
concentrating mora on hardware 
and utilities. ST shows are only a 
recent phenomenon in the States, 
and we've gleaned the best from 
two that just occurred (one in 
Disneyland and the other in 
Michigan). 

Neodesk blasts the conventions* 
(and limited) ST desktop into the 
real graphical interface world 
Imagine having the same kind of 
graphic choices and control as 
found on Amigas and Macs, 
Meaning different icons as you see 
tit — a picture of a paint brush for 
drawing program, or a typewriter 
tor a word processor. Pius the abili- 
ty to move icons OUTSIDE of win- 
dows and around the desktop. Plus 
additional features such as being 
able to move one window behind 
another, The program has been 
heavily updated, is more depend- 
able than ever, and uses less of 
the precious RAM on start-up. 





Now that you've a hot desktop, 
try wiring it with Hot Wire from 
Code head Software. Hot Wire is to 
macro programs what a Ferrari is 
to baby's buggy A sequence ol 
events can be activated with a sin- 
gle keystroke — thus eliminating 
the tedium of having to set op tor 
each program. It's the next best 
thing to having someone else do all 
the work while you sit back. One 
outstanding feaiure is that the pro- 
gram repairs the problematic Install 
— allowing startup files to be 
placed anywhere on disk, 

Art programs tor the ST are tew 
and far between in the States. Da 
Vinci Designer adds to the ranks 
with a number ol nitty features — 
besides the usual drawing func- 
tions too obvious to mention (yes it 
does lines, boxes and uses the 
mouse), Some of the unusual func- 
tions- are 3-D distorting, tint and fil- 
tering, plus a magnifying tool that 
constantly updates the image. 
Another feature ol value is a 
Stencil mode, This can be used to 
iock and protect certain colours — 
enabling an image to be moved 
behind or inside of them. Lockable 
backgrounds and an animation for- 
mat add to the mix. 

An inexpensive atte ration of the 
colour palette can be had by 
installing JRI's ST4096C. This ups 
the ante from a palette of 512 to 
4096 tor more colour choices, for 
16 colours chosen from 16 levels 
(as opposed to the normal 8). The 
ST was always capable of doing 
this, according to designer John 
Russell, but because of some bad 
circuitry, Atari had to 'trap' the 
accessing of this extra bit-plane in 
TOS and negate it from being 
used. 

The unit consists of a board: you 
pull out the Atari Shifter Chip, plug 
it in the board and replace the 
board on the Shifter's now-open 
socket. An additional Shifter Chip is 
also required (#C 0259 14-38 or 
#C07G1 3-002). and can be gotten 
directly form JRl if necessary. Be 
smart and go to an electronics 
store for the proper tools to take 
out the chips if you dedde to han- 
dle this yourself. 

JRl also includes a software 
patch for Neochrome — so as to 



access the increased palette — 
and a si ides how program.. The digi- 
tised images look very good due to 
the increased colour palette (skin 
tones needing subtle shades). 
Documentation gives all the infor- 
mation needed to put In the board; 
installation for any of the STs taking 
about 30 minutes. 

JRl also has a more radical 
product, so those with a bit more 
nerve can give the Jato accelerator 
board a try But be aware that this 
requires soldering which will invali- 
date the ST warranty This is due to 
Jato having its own 68000 chip — 
the CPU must be unsoldered and 
replaced with a socket for Jato to 
plug into, but there are no cutting of 
tracers or jumpers to deal wtth. 
Jato includes a hardware switch for 
those programs that can I tolerate 
higher speeds (like games), with 
the switch hanging out from inside 
the body of the ST Results are that 
the ST now runs at 16 MHz — 
twice its normal speed — wilh 
internal data processing; it mam 
tains the standard 8 MHz timing 
with the other computer chips for 
compatibility. A red LED is also 
attached, and indicates the 
strength' of the board by the inten- 
sity ol its glow, A shareware pro- 
gram, Quicktndex, is included, 
which allows performance data to 
be evaluated. 

The instructions for installation of 
the board are comprehensive, but 
not to be undertaken by the week- 
end hobbyisl, Jatos only drawback 
is that it can't work with machines 
that have RAM chips rated slower 
than 120 IMS (nano seconds) So 
look at your chips before taking the 
plunge. 

Interestingly enough, there's 
been a lot of talk about the lack ol 
Genlocks tor the ST, but JRf has 
had one here in the States tor 
close to a year now, The unit does 
exactly what a Genlock should; 
gear the signal from the ST to co- 
exist with a composite video srgnal 
for a combined image. Designed to 
interface with the heart of the ST, 
only Mega users can avail them- 
selves of this unit. But at least the 
option exists. 

MIDI tigers 

Musicians have found Dr T's line of 
MIDI software excellent — and the 
tradition continues with Tiger (The 
Interactive Graphic Editor) Tiger is 
a completely graphic -orientated 
music composition program; with 
draw and edit operations active 
while you play You can display up 
to three musical (racks and eight 
controllers at once, while notes are 
being drawn and edited onscreen 
(in groups as well if desired). Notes 
and phrases can be drawn or 
played-in with the mouse or using 
a keyboard. A sequencer can be 
used in conjuction with the pro 
gram, or Tiger can be used as a 
stand-alone application playing and 
editing KCS (Dr T's programs) or 



ST in the USA 



standard MIDI files. It's a bit like 
taking nineteenth century piano-roll 

notation, and adding twentieth cen- 
tury pom! and click computer graph- 

lCS- 

Spectre and the GGR cartridge 
[see this month's Emulation fea- 
ture, page 37) have a bit of compe- 
tition in Happy Computers 
Discovery Cartridge. This unit 
allows for Mac emulation, and ST 
program copying. New {though per- 
haps more limited than the GCR) is 
cheir Q-verter. designed to facilitate 
the transfer of Mac disks to the ST 
— using only ST drives. 

More than just a paint program is 
Touch Up from Migraph Software. 
Requiring one megabyte of memory 
(and a double-sided drive — all the 
new 520s have these, so check if 
yours is an early model), it works in 
hi-rea mono mode only, and gives 
you unlimited screen size to work 
with, depending on memory (you 
scroll around a virtual window and 
use icons to select functions). Four 
zoom levels, cut and paste, rota- 
tion, resizing, plus drawing tools 
and the ability to edit at pixel level 
make Touch Up a powerful tool. 
There's even scalable outline fonts 
in ten typefaces to choose from — 
plus till text patterns. The images 
can be brought in and saved out m 
many formats, including: JMG. 
PCX. TIF, Degas and MacPaint, 
among others Version 1.5 now 
eliminates the dreaded key copy 
protection, and adds features as 
well. A very classy Slide program is 
also bundled. 

Getting those images for this, 
and other art programs, can be 
done with Migraph 's new Hand 
Scanner, it covers a four-inch wide 
area in a single sweep, and pro- 
vides four scanning resolutions: 
100 r 200, 300 and 400 dots per 
inch (dpi). Contrast can be adjust- 
ed, as well as four dither patterns 
for scanning line art and halftones. 
Images can be saved on the seme 
formats as Touch Up. Migraph is 
packaging Touch Up Lite with the 



scanner at a combined lower price. 

Saving those images is usually a 
lot easier with a hard disk, bul 
every user of one knows the trou- 
ble in making backups. DVT (by 
Seymour- Radix) lets you store up 
lo one megabyte a minute from 
your ST's hard disk to a VHS video 
recorder cassette. The cartndge 
has two phono plugs that connect 
to the Video In/Out sockets of the 
VCF — which should be set at the 
fastest speed. Turn on the VCR in 
the correct mode (play for recall, 
record for save) and let the soft- 
ware take over. 

For those of you who don't 
believe in time-shifting (or don't 
have a VCR), there's Diamond 
Back from Data Innovations, This 
backup/restore program is entirely 
GEM-based, and automatically 
compresses/expands files to and 
from a floppy disk. 

Now for all those 8-bit Atari 
users out there, looking with ador- 
ing eyes at the 16-bit goodies, but 
with empty wallets at the moment, 
Take heart, Reeve Software's 
Diamond OS cartridge creates a 
graphic interface on the Atari 
XE/XL. Imagine booting up with 
sizeable windows (up to four at a 
time) and icons. Programs can be 
accessed and run using a mouse- 
simulaied control, It gets really nifty 
when you use Reeve's line of 
graphics programs — like 
Diamond Paint which has cut and 
paste, and import/save sections oi 
screen, Soon to come to the XE'XL 
range of S-bil Ataris will be 
Diamond Write, Reeves 80-col- 
umn word processor. 

Back to the 68000, we end this 
sneak preview of American ST 
products with the elegant Revolver 
from Florida-based utility producer 
Intersect. Its an all-purpose soft 
ware package that loads into pro- 
tected memory on boo tup, 
Revolver has a host of important 
and useful functions; one being a 
way to get around the problem of a 
lack of multitasking on the ST, Ihe 



program quickly and efficiently cre- 
ates sections of memory — 

enabling a 1040ST to have two 
blocks of 4Q0K+- RAM. and a bit left 
over for desktop accessories. 
Using this configuration allows you 
to load a database in one block, 
and a word processor in the other, 
tor instance. Instant switching can 
be accomplished with a series of 
keystrokes, as well as a main 
menu which can be referenced at 
any time. 

The menu allows a number of 
functions. Besides RAM disk and 
printer spooler control (using a 
printer and Ihe computer simulta- 
neously}, system information and 
configuration can be carried out. A 
disk menu allows formatting and 
making folders, plus all the Other 
usual functions — it also provides 
for a Degas- compatible screen 
snapshot mode. To add to all of the 
above, there's the roll- in. roll-out 
function. Provided that the program 
is well-behaved (some games will 
not allow this), Revolver is abte to 
save a compressed file ot every- 
thing occurring onscreen. This can 
be automatically updated too, and 
(hen rolled- in at a later time. Quite 
a lot for one package. 




■■'"■"»- rf - " " 

an : 



mrttsm jiH-ama I 



IF 



u 



M „-i * T 



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„ 




Multitasking with 
Revolver (top) t and a 
sequence of events 
con be activated with 
a single keystroke 
with Hot Wire 
{above), Below: the 
miracle of Touch Up 




MAKE THE MOST OF TGM 



As you will have seen 
from reading this article, 
there's a helluva tot of 
development going on in 
the States. TGM will be 
keeping a close eye on 
all the shows (ST, 
Amiga and PC) in an 
effort to bring you news 
of the expanding market 
of new technology long 
before anyone eise. 

However, some of the 
items featured may not 
see the light of day in 
the UK through ' official' 
outlets. Grey imports of 
all the best hardware 



will undoubtedly appear. 
although this will be 
months after the US 
release. To benefit fully 
from the latest American 
news in TGM, and get 
what you want MOW, 
you must take advan- 
tage of the American 
addresses that we print, 
If you fancy any of the 
items we mention, write 
to the company request- 
ing more information on 
the product (send the 
letter by Air Mail, and 
include a international 
reply envelope if possi- 



ble), that way you'll get 

some idea of how long it 
lakes that company to 
deal with a request. If 
you're satisfied with 
their service, then either 
send them an interna- 
lional money order, or 
even better ring them 
and pay by credit card 
(check exchange rate 
BEFORE paying, to get 
an idea of sterling equiv- 
alent). Follow these 
steps and you won't go 
far wrong. And make 
sure everything's com- 
patible with your model 
of computer! 

CONTACT: 

Da Vinci Designer: 
AdisTech Development, 



PO Box 214830, 
Sacramento, California 
9582 1. $99.95 (October 
release). 

Diamond OS, Paint, 
Write: Reeve Software, 
29 W 150 Old Farm 
Road. Warrensv>: 
Illinois 60555. Cartridge 
and Paint: $79 00 
DVT: Seym our- Radix, 
PO Box 166055, Irving, 
Texas 75016. $249,95. 
Hot Wired: $39.95 
Code head Software. 
PO Box 4336, North 
Hollywood, California 
916c 

JatO, ST4096C: JRI 
Technologies, POBox 
52??, Pittsburgh, 
California 94565. Jato: 
$99.95; ST4096C: 



$49.95; Genlock: 

$650,00. 

Revolver: Intersect, 
2628 dark Road. 
Sarasota, Florida 
34231. $69.95. 
Tiger: Dr T's Music 
Software, 220 Boylston 
Street #208 Chestnut 
Httt, Massachusetts 
02167. $100,00 
Touch Up, Lite, Hand 
Scanner: Migraph. 200 
S 333rd. Suite 220, 
Federal Way, 
Washington 9$003. 
Touch Up: $299,00; 
Touch Up Lite: $199.00: 
Hand Scanner: $399.00; 
Scanner with Touch Up 
Lite; $499.00. 

All price are US retail, 



TGM TX 022:9-89 73 










::y"> 



*»*» A 








hits 




UNIT 4 STANNITS LAtNDON NOBTH THAOE CIHTBt lASIiOON ISSEX 5S15 6 DJ ■ PHONf : (024*J 541 126 

19 It IHUS. KNIGHl FOiCE. TlTUS AW5 THE TITUS LOGO *B6 REGISTERED WUEMAWS 0* IIIUS 



Profile 




You could be for- 
given for think- 
ing that Bullfrog 

Productions 
were a relatively 

new program- 
ming force. Only 
recently, with 
the release of 
the excellent 
Populous, have 
they been afford- 
ed their share of 
the limelight. 
But they have, in 
fact, been pro- 
gramming on 16- 
bit computers for 
a good few 
years. Robin 
Candy fought off 
wasps and a rail 
strike just to 
bring you their 
story. 



Ribbeting stuff 



Bullfrog is a close knit team of 
six. Founded by Peter 
Molyneaux and Les Edgar, it 
is in fact a subsidiary of 
Taurus, a programming com- 
pany that produced application 
packages [Acquisition, X-CAD and 
Adrum) for the Amiga. Despite 
attempts by Commodore to push 
their machine to the business sec- 
tor, the Amiga market gradually 
turned towards entertainment soft- 
ware. So rather than tight the trend. 
Bullfrog was created and look the 
plunge into the world of games 
software. 

The current team consists of 
Peter Motyneaux (programming). 
Glen Corpes (programming and 
graphics}, Les Edgar (adminisrra- 
fori), Kevin Donkin [programming), 
Shaun Cooper (programming) and 
Andy Jones (graphics), 

To gain experience in the games 
market, Bullfrog took on the 1 6 bit 
conversions of Druid II from 
Firebird. At the time Firebird's prod- 



uct manager had just left; the game 
received little promotion and wasn't 
a success. Their next project, and 
their first original game. Fusion. 
took longer to program than antici- 
pated, and was finally released 
through Electronic Arts. Out of 
these teething problems Populous 
was born. 

Peter Molyneaux.: 'By the time 
work on Populous had begun we 
were working more professionally, 
We created a development envi- 
ronment where we coutd develop 
on the ST and Amiga at the same 
time. We also started to have 
Friday meetings where we could 
discuss the progress of projects 
and new ideas. Populous was real- 
ly spawned Irom one of these 
meetings. Glen got fed up with 
designing graphics and he wrote 
this routine to do Ihe main display, 
we then used lego bricks to simu- 
late the landscape. The game basi 
cally grew Irom there.' 

Finding inspiration can be the 



hardest part of any programming 

project. Bullfrog use that tried and 
tested method of going down the 
pub. Unfortunately Shaun has a 
nasty habit of being turfed out by 
the scruff of hts neck, so they've 
had to resort to alternative meth- 
ods, Peter Molyneaux explains: 

There are a lot of good program- 
mers out there and the only way 
we feel we can be as good as 
everybody else is to keep coming 
up wilh good ideas rather than to 
work for ten years on a vector rou- 
tine and come up with one a frame 
faster than everyone else. 

We've tried creating a big long 
spec list and detailing every aspect 
of the game and then getting 
someone to program it all in, but 
the result was actually quite boring 
so we scrapped lhat meihod 
We've also tried quickly program 
ming an idea m and then trying to 
build a game around it. but that 
didn't produce anything that we 
liked, 

Now when we develop a game 
we get it to a certain stage then we 
all sit around playing it. If we don I 
like it. the project is scrapped; after 
all we can't expect people to buy 



TGM TX 021:8 89 75 



Profile 



« 




"We cant 
expect people 

to buy our 

games it we 

don't like them 

ourselves" 



...and one the publics 

certainly Hked — 
Populous 




our games if we don't like them 
ourselves. 

I don't think you can spec out a 
whole game before programming; 
certainly not the type of games we 
do. When you think of an idea, 
you've got no idea how it feels: 




Leapfrogging to the 
lop, the six Bullfrogs 
(top) contemplate 
Projects A and B, one 
of which can be seen 
on the screen above 



whether it's going to be fast and 
furious or whatever. You can't lell 
how a game is going to turn out 
just from a piece of paper The best 
thing to do is to get in I here and 
play. I love playing games. The PC 



hard disk is full of them. I don't 
think it would be possible for us to 
spend months couped up in a little 
office program ming if we didn't 
enjoy playing games.' 

While many software houses 
program games on expensive 
development systems. Bullfrog pre- 
fer to work on the machines that 
the games are intended for. 
Graphics are designed using either 
Deluxe Paint II f on the Amiga or 
Art Studio on the ST. While HiSoft's 
Devpac is used to assemble the 
code. 

'We develop on the ST and 
Amiga simultaneously With 
Populous we started on the ST 
then transferred to the Amiga and 
then back to the ST again. Porting 
games across from the ST to the 
Amiga seems to be controversial at 
the moment, but what people tend 
to forget is that the Amiga is a 
slower machine. Obviously with 
games that rely heavily on graph- 
ics, such as shoot-'em-ups, it is 
important to use the Amiga's extra 
features. If you're not using the Wit- 
ter (which we don 'I in Papulous) 
then the game slows down tremen- 
dously. Even with the Witter, valu- 
able processing time is easily 
eaten up. A 32-colour Populous 
would have looked nice but would 
have played a lot slower. As it was. 
we were running out of memory 
towards the end of development, 
so a 32-colour version probably 
wouldn't have been possible. 

To us the most important aspect 
of a game is payability. We try to 
think that if someone spends £24 
on one of our games they should 
get 24 hours of enjoyment from it. 

At the moment Bullfrog are work- 
ing on three projects; two for 
Electronic Arts, which should be 
available early next year, and a 
third as yet unsigned. When a 
name is chosen for a game it has 
to be checked out to see if anyone 
else owns the copyright tor that 
name. This process is currently 
going on with the latest Bullfrog 
projects so we can't reveal any 
names yet. However. TGM can 
reveal a few exclusive details on 
the forthcoming games. 

Project A appears to be a cross 
between Lords of Midnight and 



Populous, None of the Bullfrog 
team has had much experience 
playing strategy games, and rather 
than draw on preconceived ideas 
of what a strategy game should be 
like they've used their inexperience 
to design the type of strategy game 
they would LIKE to play. 

What you've got is a view rather 
like Populous except it is basBd on 
vectors instead of blocks. Vectors 
give Bullfrog a greater degree of 
freedom with the graphics. There 
are now landscaped features such 
as waterfalls. The landscape can 
also be rotated, so nothing remains 
hidden, while a zoom in/out feature 
lets you examine points of interest 
in more detail. The objective of the 
game hasn't been decided upon 
yet but there are numerous war- 
mongering tribes wandering the 
landscape who you will have 10 
interact with, 

One of the novel aspects o! 
Populous was the simultaneous 
two-player game. Project A will 
allow six Amigas to be linked 
together for a truly epic game. 

Prelect B is a world apart from 
Populous. Set in a maze it's a sort 
of puzzle game based on how 
water always finds its level. The 
player controls a centipede that 
grows and mutates while water 
gradually fills the maze, ultimately 
flooding it. 

Bullfrog are keeping tight lipped 
about the final project. It is expect- 
ed to take 13 months to develop 
and if their current prefects are 
anything to go by it should be truly 
amazing. 

And the future? 

Peter; 1 hope there will be a 
return to developing original 
games. I think that arcade licences 
are going to die the death, 

Glen: The Amiga is further 
behind today's arcade machines 
than the 64 was four years ago.' 

Peter: The routines on 
Afterburner were great. They were 
probably as fast as you get them 
but the game was slill rubbishy. 
Arcade games are getting more 
and more sophisticated and the 
poor old ST and Amiga won't be 
able to keep up. I hope more peo 
pie will start to design original soft- 
ware A good idea needn't take a 
long time to program. Terns was 
created on the Apple Macintosh m 
about a day. Eventually we will 
have to start developing for ihe 
consoles but there isn't a decent 
console widely available over here 
yet. 

'I can't see us returning to busi- 
ness software. Entertainment soft- 
ware is so much more fun to pro- 
gram and you don't have to be so 
diligent. You don't have to produce 
300-page manuals or give after- 
sales technical support However, I 
think that our background in pro- 
fessional software has meani that 
we've got a completely different 
approach to programming. We're 
going to be programming games 
for a good while yet 



76 TGM TX02 1:8-89 











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Far from the peace and quiet of Corinthian 
columns and ivy-clad arches, Paul Rigby 
discovers that it's the lure of outer space 
that is drawing the adventure and strate- 
gy crowds at the moment. But before the 
reviews, here's the adventure news... 



ADVENTURE 

STRATEGY 

ROLEPLAY 

Column 




They say that Time waits for no man". Well 
neither it seems, do Infocom. Not content 
with watching adventure players struggle 
over Shogun, Journey and Zonk Zero. 
Infocom have announced a new RPG 
called Minds of Titan. It w«H, according to 
Infocom, be released around October and 
have 'a type of interface not dissimilar from 
that found in Battletech.' 

Apparently, though, it is a totally new 
concept. developed by Westwood 
Associates, who have no connection to 
Battletech. 

Epyx, kings of the sports simulation, have 
decided to dip their track shoes into the 
realms of the RPG. Called The Omnicron 
Conspiracy. Epyx's space RPG is intrigu- 
ing. Listen to the blurb: You'll be tempted 
by cheap booze, wild sex and mind-altering 
drugs. You'll be chased across six planets 
by crazed religious cu I lists, vicious droid 
assassins and horny women. You'll have 
the time ol your life.' Can't wait. 

Space is proving a popular theme, New 
World Computing (Might & Magic) have 
also been beavering away on a spacey 
RPG. it's currently called Space: The 
Game. 

Have you noticed that Interplay have 
been rather quiet lately 9 Too quiet, you 
might say, Well, it appears that the chaps 
who brought us The Bard's Tale are soon to 
unleash Dragon Wars, while the Wasteland 
team are working on a time-travel game 
called, at the moment, Mean Time. Finally, 
look out for Level 9 s Scapeghost. Which 
may be out and about even as you read 
these words. Apparently,. Scapeghost will 
not arrive with the customary novella, L 
asked Level 9's Mike Austin why, he said 
that there wasn't much point as you are 
dead at the beginning of the game, any- 
way, Hmmm, I'm not Sure about that, but 
there you go. 
' I'm looking forward to 
previewing the five- part 
adventure. Blood of a 
Vampire by MSB Games 
for the C64. MSB 
describe themselves as 
'home producers' of 
adventures. They're 

searching for adventure 
writers and adventures to 
publish. 

MSB Games: 2 Bude 
Close. Bramhall, 

Stockport, Cheshire SK7 
2GP, 

Thanks to Sue 
Micronet' Medley and 
John 'Soothsayer' 

Bamsley for the copy of 
their new ST adventure 
magazine. Syntax. 

Packed full of reviews, 
hints and lips, screen- 
shots, letters etc. Syntax 



m 



is an enjoyable read and well worth the 
£3.50 asking price. 

Syntax: 9 Warwick Road, Sidcup, Keni 
DA14 6LJ. 

Another excellent magazine I've been 
reading with my cocoa is the Adventure 
Coder, devoted to creating adventures 
using all ot the adventure utilities, as well 
as machine code. Issue One includes a 
very revealing review Of the GAC+. 

Chris Hester (Editor); 3 West Lane, 
Baildon, Nr Shipley, Wesl Yorkshire BD17 
5HD. 

Piece of gossJp of the month 1 * Well, this 
one is pretty old, but I still chuckle when I 
picture it. 

It so happens that the offices at 
Electronic Arts are situated in an area 
which is prone to the odd earth tremor. 
Anyway, about a year ago. EA offices expe- 
rienced a rather nasty earthquake, nothing 
too serious you understand, The story goes 
that Tnp Hawkins, EA President while sil- 
ting at his desk, felt the earth moving 
beneath him. He then promptly stood up 
and took a quick look to see if anyone was 
around. Seeing no-one. Trip jumped up 
onto his chair, raised his arms and fists into 
the air and proceeded to shout: 'Go, Earth. 
Go>' 

The point is: would you buy a used car 
off this man? 



PC £59.95 

STAR SAGA: ONE 
(BEYOND THE 

BOUNDARY) Masterplay 

The space plague has ravaged Earth and 
its colonies. Once an adventurous society, 
discovering new planets, civilisations, new 
inventions and advancing science. Earth 
has now become introverted, Terrified of 
another plague. The Boundary, enforced 
by the Space Police, has served to keep 
out any outsiders. You can leave, of 
course, but just try getting back in. Star 
Saga: One (SS1) focuses on six people 
who want, for their own reasons, to cross 
the Boundary, 

SS1. previewed in last month's shadow 
software feature, comes complete with six 
12-page character booklets: 13 game 
booklets (each of aboul 45 pages); a 
colour map and counters: the mysterious" 
Document Two: game disk and a 46-page 
instruction book. 

SS1 is a breakthrough in computer- 
based roleplaying. We've had one player 
controlling one character, or a team of 
player-characters — like Imageworks's 
Bloodwych — but never have we had the 



78TGMTX022:9-89 




Adventure/Strategy/RPG 



ST (also on Amiga, PC) £23.99 

QUEST FOR THE TIME 

BIRD Infogrames 

Your quest is to stop the rogue god. 
Ham or. from escaping his prison (a conch 
— no I don't know why either} and wreak- 
ing general havoc. You must recover the 
conch and the Time Bird. Only then can the 
incantations be said to save the world. To 
do this you control a maximum of four char- 
acters m the process. 

Time Bird was written by the chaps who 
produced Passengers in the Wind so whilst 
playing Time Bird 1 waited, with baited 
breath, for the floor to collapse to reveal, 
yet another, empty Infogrames adventure. 
However. Time Bird is not that dad. In fact 



its pretty good, The graphics 
are wonderful, whilst the 
appropriate sound effects, on 

the ST. are excellent. 

The adventure is icon-driv- 
en. Actions are executed via 
a combination of mouse 
clicks, in addition to a variety 
of multiple choice menus. 

However, the system can 
be frustrating, It is easy to 
click on the wrong part of the 
graphic which can take you in the wrong 
direction, Getting back can be difficult. 
AIsd. searching the graphics for objects is 
pure luck as they are positioned in obscure 
places. You must, basically, search every 
inch of the pictur e, which can be very 
time consuming, I'll give you an example. 
At the start of the game I happened to click 
{purely by accident, of course) on the 
ample cleavage of one young lady. This 
brought the response: Let's not forget this 
food. We'll be needing it.'! 



Spectrum £1 2.95 

AUSTERLITZ 1805 ccs 

Ken Wright appears again as one of the 
few wargame authors who regularly write 
for the Spectrum. With a string of success- 
es behind him Ken, has taken the system 
used in Wellington at Waterloo and pro- 
duced the fateful day during the French 
campaign when Napoleon decided to 
abandon the British invasion and concen- 
trate, instead, on Russia, which lead to 
Napoleon's famous victory on the field of 
Austerlitz. 

Aust&r/itz 1305 arrives with one tape and 
a 32-page booklet which contains the 
instructions, historical data and designers 
notes, Austerlitz can be played one- or two 
player, on three levels of difficulty. You can 
control either the French Army under 
Napoleon or the Austro- Russian army 




ability to control up to six players, each 

with their own character and each with 
Their own task. All six {you can play soli- 
taire or up to six players) can wander 
around the game world getting on with 
their own business, each meeting new 
civilisations, each conversing with different 
alien races and each presented with dif- 
ferent problems. The amazing thing is it is 
possible lo never meet another player- 
character I 

You can, of course. In fact, you will find 
it advantageous to cooperate later in the 
game, if not before. The Universe is a big 
place. Ydu'II need all the help you can get? 

SS1 operates by using the computer as 
a Games Master (GM). The computer 
moderates combat, keeps track of players' 
locations, handles irade transactions and 
updates personal possessions. In addi- 
tion, it directs each player to read a suit- 
able paragraph, in one of the booklets, 
when the situation calls for it. The game 
does not have any graphics — bul who 
needs them when you've got reams of 
prose, that infocom would be proud of. 
You keep track of your position in space 
by using the colour map and counters. 
Planets can be explored (each with their 
own civilisations, social problems, cus- 
toms etc), items can be traded, skills can 
be (earned and so on In fact the trading 
area is the way you upgrade your posses- 



sions (ship avionics, weaponry, defensive 
armour etc). The one drawback is that, 
although you are presented with detailed 
reports, you do not have a great deal of 
control over combat routines (which has 
lowered the ratings, somewhat). 

I consider Star Saga: One to be as 
important a release, if not more so, than 
Dungeon Master. For the first time, table - 
top RPGs come to the computer. The 
combat routines could be improved as 
could the interaction. However, when it 
comes down to it you have to say that SS1 
is atmospheric, exciting and, the best thing 
is, when you have completed the game as 
one character you can switch to another 
and start all over again! The price is very 
high, I know, but however you do it, save 
up. Split the cost Six ways with a tew 
friends, whatever — buy this game! 

Available from Computer Adventure 
World, Bank Buildings. 1A Charing Cross, 
Birkenhead L41 SEJ) 



Engagement 70% 
Presentation 
Atmosphere 95% 
Interaction 78% 
Overall 



under Kutusov. 

The infantry corps can be organised into 
line, column or square. Cavalry and artillery 
make up the rest of your forces. You may, 
under correct conditions, divide and amal- 
gamate your forces as well as examine 
them for strength and moral. Moral is a crit- 
ical modifier as units can route if moral 
drops too much. The domino effect of adja- 
cent routing units is always a possibility in 
this case, 

CCS are to be congratulated for their fine 
packaging for these games (artwork by 
Newsfield's own Oliver Frey, no less..,), 
and Ken Wright for producing an exciting 
and enjoyable wargame which is a credit to 
the 48K Spectrum. Ai and Combat routines 
work well with good use of limited intelli- 
gence. 

Recommended. 



Presentation I 
AI 80% 

Atmosphei 

merit : 
System 
Over all 63°< 






TGM TX 022:9-89 79 



Adventurm/Strategy/RPG 



ST £35.00 

GRAND FLEET 

Simulations Canada 

(available from Compulse Adventure World. 
Sank Buildings, 1A Charing Cross, 

Birkenhead L41 6EJ) 

Grand Fleet simulates the tactical naval 
combat in the North Sea during World War 
I. The packaging arrives with a game disk 
and two glossy grid maps, with the order ol 
battle for each scenario on the flip side. 
Two Chinagraph pencils complete the pack- 
age. 

Grand Fleet actually simulates the span 
of 1906-1920. thus covering all types of 
ships which had any connection with WW1 . 
The player acts as Senior Naval 
Commander so manoeuvre orders are 
given to your Heel while general orders are 
given to the other fleets who are under the 
direct control ol your subordinate comman- 
ders. 

The game, as mentioned in last month's 
feature, has no graphics (the display looks 
very basic) so the 'Fog of War' is 
paramount You are only aware of what you 
can see and what reports you may receive 
from your commanders. This text only 
principle makes for realistic naval situations 
which effectively simulate the tension and 
excitement of sea warfare. Any reports you 
may receive can be transferred to your grid 
map. However, playing Grand Fleet makes 
you wonder if that last sighting was correct. 
Did they really see smoke? Was that force 
estimation accurate? In addition to these 
factors is the weather (tog. etc), as well as 
ships laying smoke and so on. 

Grand Fleet is a most innovative 
wargame. For sheer tension, unpredictabili- 
ty and realism it cannot be beaten. 




sen 1 at ion 

Al B7°A 






Overall 



with your surgical instruments adjacent. You 
can pick up objects with the mouse and 
use' them on the patient, such as swabs, 
for example. If you make a mistake you are 
sent to medical school. It Ihe mistake is 
very serious the patient is sent to the mortu- 
ary (graphic included, of course). Life & 
Death (which is better than The Surgeon, 
by the way), brings a dash of fresh air 
(spiced with disinfectant) to leisure soft- 
ware. 



PC (also on ST, Amiga) £24.99 

LIFE & DEATH 

Software Toolworks 

Now here's a novelty! This Surgeon 
Simulator comes with a genuine set of sur- 
geons gloves and face mask (not included 
in the NHS version). In addition to the man- 
uals, leaflets and memos is a history of 
surgery pamphlet, which really gets you into 
Ihe mood for some good ol' slicin' 'n' diem'. 
After an initial visit to the medical class you 
trot off to examine your patients. Clicking on 
their stomachs brings a close-up of their 
turn into view. Examining the area may 
bring a digitised Yeeeow!' or 'Hmmmpphh!' 
indicating pain and discomfort. X-rays and 
ultrascans can be taken to assist your diag- 
nosis, 

If you need to operate you are allowed to 
pick a good team of assistants who give 
advice during the op The actual operation, 
preceded by a short animated sequence of 
the patient being wheeled in, is very realis- 
tic, A close-up of the stomach is shown, 



.antatlon 
Al 77% 

Aim 

■MHigoiiiont 1 1 
System B2% 

rail 



PC £29.99, C64 £24,99 

CURSE OF THE AZURE 
BONDS ssi/us Gold 

As I mentioned in last month's preview I 
was not happy with the first AD&D RPQ, 
Foot of Radiance (POR), which I consid- 
ered more akin to basic DB.D. However. 
SSI have got their act together with Curse 
of the Azure Bonds (CAB). Two new class- 
es, Paladin and Ranger, high level spells 
including raise dead', and a greater variety 
of monsters mean that, as far as I'm con- 
cerned, this is the first proper AD&D prod- 
uct I've seen from SSI. 

The POR system has been retained but 
enhanced. Another big change regards Ihe 
actual plot. Basically, your team awake to 
find that they have been ambushed, cap- 
tured and cursed with five magical bonds 
which can be seen embedded on one 
chap's arm at the start ot the game. The 
bonds have powers to take control of your 
character's actions. Your quest? Get rid of 
them 1 

The actual storyline is an immense 
improvement over POR which just present- 
ed a set of missions for you to complete, 
CAB has a deeper, more involved plot 
which moves at a good pace. 



Magic still has to be learned and scrolls 
read which is okay with me as this system 
is more realistic and prevents the magic 
users taking a complete hold on the game, 
which happened in The Bard's Tale. Ttie 
combat system is very good, with the game 
allowing the player to deal in tactical 
manoeuvring. A Quick feature allows you to 
turn a character over to computer control to 
speed the combat routine CAB is not per- 
fect, though. A feature to enable the com 
bat to finish in seconds would be an attrac 
tion to players who liave no real interest to 
combat. Even with Quick, combat can drag 
on for 30-45 minutes — you have been 
warned! The parser could have been 
improved to allow more freedom to interact 
with NPCs. As it is. you must decide on 
your general approach to a character, such 
as 'haughty'. The computer takes it from 
there. Overall. CAB is an excellent RPQ, 
much improved and polished over PGR It 
is good to see SSI actually improving the 
system rather than sitting back on their 
TSR licence. With a good storyline and 
excellent graphics. CAB is recommended 
whatever version you have. 




Attrlbui 

Pre< 



C on bat Skill: 

ftrnour Type :L«Atht 
Meapon Type:Broad Sword 
Conbat Speed: 
Magical Energy: 4 V 

ftl lgnneiit Chaos (Btnisn) 



amy size is rron 
Current a rn y size 
A Brief History: 



80 TGM TX022:9-89 




PC, Atari ST 29.99 

RED LIGHTNING 

SSI/US Gold 

fled Lightning attempts to forecast what a 
third world war confrontation, between the 
NATO and Warsaw Pact forces would be 
like. The game arrives with a 27-page 
manual and a colour map-card which 
shows, on the reverse, a variety of addi- 
tional information (unit icons, travel move- 
ments etc) 

You actually play the Supreme 
Commander of either set of forces (a two- 
player game can be selected), and have 
the option of examining your forces in 
great detail. There are three scenarios 
(20-60 turns) with a variety of modifiers 




PC (Amiga planned spring 
1990) £34.95 

SPACE M*A*X 

Hewsoa ''Final Frontier Software 
Space /WVTXsees you as the project man- 
ager for the world's first commercial space 
station. The simulation, itself, arrives with 

three disks and a professionally produced. 
137-page manual complete with pho- 
tographs, colour cutaway diagrams, et al. 
The author of Space M'A'X was actually 
involved in the Space Program, developing 
avionics for the Viking, Mariner and 
Voyager missions 



such as a variety of seasons, the use of 
Special Forces, difficuity level and the use 
of chemical weapons. In addition, a variety 
of reports are available (political, weather 
and so on), fled Lightning exhibits good 
use of aircraft which can attack force con- 
centrations, supply lines and airfields as 
well as going on recce missions. 

Red Lightning Is probably one of the 
best presented wargames SSI have pro- 
duced I found it a pleasure to use No 
obscure, mulli -layered menus here. While 
detail is good, some of the basic research 
is weak. For example, SSI advocate that 
the F-1 17 should perform strike missions. It 
>s designed, solely, for reconnaisance mis- 
sions, it has about as much strike capabili- 
ty as my big toe. However, even with the 
odd wrinkle Red Lightning is a quality 
product. 



F3 








Pre 

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srafl 






Adventure Helpline 

HIMV "I nfS 3KEVIEWS 
COMPETITIONS 

HIIIISHIUMRI rui/l* 

OUR L1VK OPERATORS Aftfc 

STANDING BY TO TAKE YOURt AL 1 

TELEPHONE: 
0898 338 933 



ISp per iniri Off Peak 
3Sp per min Peak Time 

If ym don't need us now, 
think (^f the limes vouV need id help, 

KEEP THIS NIMBKR 



For a full explanation of review classes 
and ratings, took at page 32 in Issue 21 . If 
you have any queries or suggestions on 
any aspect of adventures, strategy or 
roleplaying games then send them off to: 
Paul Rigby, TGM, PO BOX 10, Ludlow, 
Shropshire SYB 1DB. 



In the simulations, you are responsible 
for planning of payloads {tor the shuttles 
and so on}, sequencing and assembly of 
modules (habitation, astrophysics lab etc) 
of the space station, production of labs and 
manufacturing. The upshot being, you must 
faunch, assemble and operate the space 
station, However, space is business, so 
you have a fixed budget and a time limit to 
complete the project. As well as juggling 
with the many financial and payload prob 
lems. you will have to contend with fires, 
explosions, workforce strikes and sickness. 
In addition, if you do not attach the mod- 
ules correctly the station may suffer air 
leaks and so on. Further, it is not just a 
matter of docking modules willy nilly, you 
must plan ahead as some modules need 
adapters to enable them to dock on the sta- 
tion, others need supports modules to allow 
them to operate at aif, and so on. You must 
have enough sleep stations tor the people 
who are working on the station, correctly 
position the modules so that the centre of 
mass is not unstable, etc. etc. 

Space M*A*X has quality written all over 
it. It will take you many, many hours just to 
come to grips with the details — never 
mind succeed in completing the project. 
The program is so useful that, if there are 



any business managers reading. Space 
/W'jA'X would make an excellent business 
management training tool. CGA graphics 
and typical PC sound do not detract from 
this heavyweight, I await the Amiga version 
with interest. 




Presentation &6% 

Al 93% 

Atmosphere 90% 

Engagement n a 

System 91% 



TGfvl TX 022:9-89 81 



AWHOL€ N€W WORLD 

OF ACTION AND ADV€NTUR€ 





RED LIGHTNING™ race the 
fearsome power of the Soviet army in 
the war that as yet has only been talked 
about - the explosive collision between 
the forces of NATO and the Warsaw 
Pact, Painstaking military research 
and strategic intelligence challenge 
the arid wargamer to explore the 
myriad of possible outcomes should 
World War III erupt 

ATARI ST/ HtM PC £29-39 
COMING SOON -AMIGA £29.99 



STORM ACROSS EUROPE™ 

From North Africa to Sweden, from 
Gibraltar to Russia, re-enact in every 
detail the raging blitzkrieg Hitler 
unleashed on Europe in 1 939. Command 
your forces of land, sea and air in six 
years of dramatic warfare. 
Zxap Sizzler - 94%. 



CBM G4/128 £24.99 
IBM PC £29.99 



DEMON'S WUiTLH™ The demon god 

MalUon has cut fail Demon"* Winter upon the 
Und, in order that his minions - the Kobeldj 
and goblifll - may thrive lit their task to iree 
him from 

incarceration, [1 Is 
only the combined 
powers of your party 
of five - be ihey 

barbarian iiul thief, 

at wizard and 
scholar - that can 
uncover the spells to 
trap Malifon forever 
and undo hi* wintry 
cone, 






y» :*V 



CBM 64/120 DESK £19.99 

IBM PC £24.99 

AT ABM ST dt AMIGA £24.99 



BATTLES OF NAPOLEON*" fl superb 
advanced war game and a full blown 
construction set. Build your own maps with five 
terrain option*, or let the computer generate a 
random scenario. 
Create the armies of 
your Choice meeting 
the requirements of 
your exacting 
specifications. Or if 
yon wish to get 
straight to the action, 
choose from the 
many pre-made 
scenarios such an 
Waterloo, Quatre 
Bras, Auerstaedt and Borodino 
CBM 64/128 DISK £24,99 
IBM PC £29.99 




There's a world full of opportunities with SSI - the dramas of 
the past, the mysteries of the future, gathered together 
to form an unrivalled collection of role playing 
fantasies and all action simulations that offer a new 
dimension in computer entertainment. 



DSA 
YOU€XPLOR€ OTH€MIM€S,OTH€RWOKLDS 



:1 £ 



U.S. Goii Ltd , UnHiZ J HolfDni W*f , Bollard, BLnmnghAm GG 7 AJC Ttl 0Z1 62S 33«S > 






STAR COMMAND™ 

A multicharacter adventure where 
all your space born fantasies come alive 
Create your select band of eight 
startroopers and hunt dawn the 
infamous Blackboard and his band of 
intergalactic pirates only to find 
(should you survive) an entire alien, 
insectoid race poised to make a blood 
chilling invasion ol your univerte. 

ATARI ST £29.99 
IBM PC £34.99 



OVERRUN™ Europe and the Middle East 
Mire as the near future battlefields as the 
force* of the East battle the farces of the W«t 
in the MOSt realistic tactical simulation ol 

modern land warfare 
ever made, Based on 
an improved version 
of the game system 
used in Panzer Strike 
and Typhoon of Steel, 
Overran is nol 
simply a game - il is 
[lightening reality, 

CBM 64/1 Z8 
DESK £24.99 




Sv- 







REVIEWS 



84 ■ THE NEW ZEALAND STORY 

Ocean have done the impossible and 
improved on the arcade original. It has been 
a struggle to get a go on the game in the 
TGM offices with everyone fighting for the 
joystick! Follow the stir- 

ldUr 16 his friends in this 
antipodean adventure. 



STAR 

PLAYER 




machine 

■ 

■ 
■ 

TO P 



94 ■ FIENDISH 
FREDDY'S BIG TOP 
OFUN 

Yet another mulit-evenl 
circus game hits the streets. Save the Big 
Top by drawing big crowds as you fight 
through sin amazing acts while avoiding the 
mean depreciations of Freddy the disgrun- 
tled clown — a creation from Mlndscape, 



AMIGA 

Alien Legjon ,,96 

Beam ,.90 

Flendish Freddy ,,.9* 

Gamin i Wiftg ...,84 

Grand Prtx Circuit 35 

Indiana Jones end (he Last 

Crusade ,...92 

Kutt .93 

Leonardo 92 

The New Zealand Story 84 

Wtghtdawn ...96 

fl«A Dangerous 93 

SDI 91 

Skate of the An" 97 

Tom and Jerry,. „.. ....83 

ATARI ST 

Beam .,90 

Chariots of Wrath.. ,,86 

Dominator ,,9i 

Gemini Wif*g,, ...... ,.84 

Hawkeye .,,.85 

HeUreiser ..„.,,. , 96 

Indiana Jones and me Last 

Crusade ..,,,92 

MrHsli . ...94 

M-ghtdawn .... ...96 

Quartz 97 

R--ck Dangerous .,....,....,..93 

Tom and Jerry 83 



Kutt ,. 

Starray 

COMMODORE 64/1 20 

American Indoor Soccer , 

Beam .90 

Bod's Full House 90 

Tom and Jerry 83 

Gemini Wing. . 84 

Nightdawn 96 

SPECTRUM 

Bob's Full House 
Crusade.. 

Domlnalor, 

Gemini Wing...., . 84 

Indiana Jones and (he Last 

Crusade., 92 

AMSTRAD CPC 

ator 

Bote's Full House 90 

Dommaior 

SEGA 

The Baseball... 97 

Galaxy Force . 

Ghosibusters . 96 



No violence please, this is a cartoon 

TOM AND JERRY 



Magic Bytes 

Tom the Cat and Jerry Mouse are the 
stars ol some of the most violent 
i.but hilariously funny) classic car- 
toons ever made, In this, their first 
pixellated adventure, subtitled 
Hunting High And Low, you play the part ot 
Jerry racing around the house's five rooms 
picking up bits of cheese and avoiding the 
grasping paws of Tom. 

When Tom catches Jerry a few seconds 
are knocked of) the mouse timer (rather 
than inches off his tail). Six minutes are 
allowed to collect all the cheese, but how to 
stop Tom? 

Rooms contain obstacles to slow him 
down, which can be jumped over; large 
objects on shelves can be dropped onto 
Toms poor old head, banana skins make 
him slide across the floor, or there are sev- 
eral distractions to catch Tom's attention 
making him oblivious to mousey antics. 

JHooms are linked by mouse holes set in 
the skirting boards, which make up a sub- 
game: Jerry runs down the tunnel dodging 
mousetraps and various other unpleasant 
objects thrown in by Tom, while catching 
cheese. Five rooms in six minuies seems 
like a tough task, especially with Tom on 



your tail, but is the smell of cheese hard to 
resist? 

We found Tom And Jerry a disappoint- 
ment. The sprites look reasonably close to 
their cartoon counterparts but the actual 
gameplay collapses through too little con- 
tent to engage interesl for long Collecting 
cheese and dropping things on Tom is 
amusing, but only for a very short while. 



£24.99 



Magic Bytes should have employed 
the services of a decent interior deco- 
rator to sort out the walls in this 
game, they're eye straining. Tom and 
Jerry move around the screen rather 
awkwardly, and this, coupled with the 
boring gameplay, causes frustration 
and flying joysticks very quickly. 




OTHER FOMfWS 

No other versions planned. 









•r ^ n 


■1 V^^H^ftd 




— - 




1 




r ». -W» «.—■.». C2 ' 


; H \tC TCt.«h««3 







The sprites have a nice cartpany flavour 
to them, but the game lacks much to do 



£24.99 



The Amiga game scores slightly high- 
er for its improved lunes and amusing 
laugh which Tom utters when he 
catches you. 




C64 128 

41% 



£9.99 
cass, 

£14.99 disk 

Frankly the worst of the three ver- 
sions, the bright garish backdrops 
don't fit the usual blocky C64 graph- 
ics. And Jerry s almost the same size 
as Tom... not convincing. Consider 
carefully before shelling out. 



TGM TX 021:8-89 83 



Reviews 



Antipodean antics full of kiwis 



THE NEW ZEALAND 
STORY 



Ocean 

New Zealand is a very nice place 
to five, especially for Tiki and his 
friends in Auckland Zoo, They 
are kiwis, lovable little yellow 
birds who wouldn't hurl a fly. But 
unfortunately the game's baddie game 
would — a psychotic walrus with a 
healthy appetite for kiwis is the villainous 
disturber of this peace. 

When Tusk Features snaffles Tiki and 
his friends from the 200 in the dead ot 
night, Tiki luckily escapes. And where 
better to begin the search for his com- 
panions than in Auckland, armed with a 
bow and an unlimited supply of arrows 
with which to kill the meanies infesting 
each level. These include creatures as 
diverse as snails, frogs, penguins and 
china dolls, Some run around on their 
own legs (two or four), others ride 
around on a weird and whacky array of 
transport (everything from balloons to 
geese). 

As Tiki leaps around tram platform to 
platform in five locations shooting, bad- 
dies often leave behind fruit (for bonus 
points), or a variety of bonus objects 
including lasers, bombs and a fireball- 



spitting wand, and an alarm clock which 
stuns the baddies for a few seconds 
when collected. But as kiwis don't fly Tiki 
moves about in a pair of trendy blue 
trainers which enable him to leap and 
bound. Often, however, dead ends pose 
a problem which can be overcome by 
hitching a ride on a balloon supplied at 
the bottom of steep inclines, or by killing 
one of the airborne creatures. 

Watery obstacles are tackled by don- 
ning an aqualung, but the amusingly 
designed and detailed aquatic meanies 



Shock horror headline starts war to death 

GEMINI WING 



Virgin/Mastertronic 

0eading your gutter-press Sunday 
paper, you may never have realised 
that those "alien restaurants on the 
moon stories can have some nasty 
comebacks. For years now, the 
Soonday Spirit has printed smear stories 
about our stellar cousins. Tolerant beings, 
they ignored till one day a journalist coined 
the headline 'Die Mutant Alien Scum'. 

All hell was let loose, the aliens declared 
war on Earth and prepared for an easy vic- 
tory But rather than read the Soonday 
Spirit, they would have been better oft 
watching Earth's weapons technology 
development. The Gemini Wing project was 




ready and launched against the aliens with- 
oul delay As a Gemini Wing pilot you are 

sent (with or without a companion) into the 
dimensional voids to shout the official 
Gemini Wing battle cry 'Die Mutant Alien 
Scum (and kill a few of course). 

Prepare for a journey into a weird alien 
dimension where level after level of pissed 
off denizens wait to blow you away. The 
action lakes place in many exotic vertically 
scrolling locations, and the aliens aren't the 
only hazards, Gun turrets, walls of stone 
and (lame as well as mean end-of-level fat- 
ties vie to bring about your demise. Your 
standard weapon is a twin laser set up, but 
due to a strange warp in temporal logic gun- 
balls (extra weapon pods) are occasionally 
created, 

There are three ways to gain these gun- 
balls; first, shoot certain aliens as they 
hover; second, shoot aliens called Bringers, 
which drag a string of eight gunballs behind 
them; third — despicable but sometimes 
necessary — nip behind your partner in 
two- player mode and nick his gunballs. 

Gunballs include three-way fire, 2000- , 
5000- and 10000-poinl bonuses, alien> 




With identical graphics on the Amiga 
{b0tt} and the ST (above), its the bheky 
C64 game (right) which suffers most 

seeking missiles and the awesome wind- 
screen wipers of death, 
A wonderful cartoon -like quality enters 

with the end-of-level nasties: large cen- 
tipede-like creatures, something resem- 
bling a walrus and a huge sentient battle 
craft. The going gets very tough, especially 
on later levels, bui Gemini Wing is playable 





£9.99 

Blll| 

£14,99 disk 

With a good title tune on the 12BK ver- 
sion, the Spectrum game's every bit as 
tough as its big brothers, though the 
action slows down a touch when a lot 
of aliens are on the screen at one time. 



84 TGM TXD22:9-89 




are as dangerous as their landed 
cousins. Watch out, too. for the oxygen 
level in the status panel, stay under 

water tor too long and Tiki flaps his little 
wings in a vain attempt to reach fresh air, 

A kiwi friend is saved at the end of 
each level, and at the completion of 
every four screens a fatty appears to 
have a go a) stamping Tiki's card. 

Right from (he start New Zealand 
Story (can you think of a less hard-sell 
game title?) had the TGM office in tur- 
moil, with everyone fighting to have 
another go, It may sound Irke just anoth- 
er platform game, but its excellent graph- 
ics and tunes coupled with the compul- 
sive gameplay make this one you must 
add to your software collection. The 
arcade original was very good, but 
Ocean seem to have dona the impossi- 
ble and improved on it. 
in* 



enough to stop you feeling the old why 
bother frustration, With a lot of coin-op 
conversion releases around at the moment, 
we're glad to say that Gemini Wing is one 
of the better examples. 
MC 



£9.99 

cass. 




£14.99 dis 



. 



Although colourful, the famous blocky 
sprites make It a wee bit difficult to 
avoid danger at times, and the multi- 
load is a bit of a pain- Worse still, 
there s only a one-player mode, which 
kills the point of the game a little. 



£19.99 



® 



The graphics are colourful and the 
ingame tuna* are jolly, but the Amiga 
version gives us the impression that 
the machine hasn't been used to its 
full potential. Stilf the game is very 
playable, and that's what counts at the 
end of the day. 



£24 99 



o 



Once you've recovered from the shock 
of seeing sunglass-wearing teddies, 
goose-riding penguins and firework- 
lobbing crabs, the sheer- payability 
drags you in and refuses to let go until 
you the game's completed. II you liked 
the arcade original this Is the game for 
you, and if you never heard of Tiki and 
Co, this would be a good time to get 
acquainted. 



OTHER FORMATS 

The Commodore 64 version should be 
available by the time you read this, 
priced £9.99 cass, E14 99 disk. 



Ul» OOU171J.U Hi. UUUJUUUU KITH HI 



I_» i ■ T ■ f r , » l^t ^I t . 3,t j j t.i r ; ( t p ■ ^ • f J , ■ - - < i , - - - . - < . f ■• . . s.l\r { ;f f i 



I , i , t t i, r , r ( i , 

i t 'r '» "i 'I 

' i ' i f , I t ' * "d, 

i ,t r i ,t T i ,t"7H 



«t 'l '! 
fr< t* T 1 1 f l« I 

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r ,i ,r ,i .t^ 



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>t 'i U "i < 

r 

hB*. '• t t I,' I 



t i t t t l f t ,r . u f ,' ,» ,1 ,1 ,1 ,',',' 
T, i, t, T, t(*i w i f if i r 'i 'r ■-, ■ \ 

WkjJ Ir 't *r ♦!'!- "- ': U 'l 'f Ml 



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All 




£19.99 



The alien horde swoops around with 
great zeal creating havoc for an unpre- 
pared player A pleasant tune plays 
throughout the game, and the graphics 
are of the same cartoon quality as the 
Amiga s 



OTHER FORMATS 

The Amstrad CPC version (£9,99 cass, 
£14.99 disk) should be available by the 
time you read this. 



In retrospect, having waited so long for 
it, perhaps the Amiga version was over- 
rated compared with its C64 original — 
and the delay has made Hawkeye's 
parallax scrolling seem less than exert- 
ing in comparison to other 16-bit relea 
es. In most respacts graphically identi- 
cal to the Amiga game, the only real dif- 
ference lies in the title tune (though nei- 
ther of the 1 6-bit versions are quite as 
good as the C64's tune). 
Machine Update 78% 

AMIGA 

Grand Prix Circuit 

ACCOLADE ■ £24.95 

PC 64% — TGM01 5. Commodore 64 47% — 
TGM017 

Budding Amiga Mansells may well 
cheer its appearance, but the rest of us 
will probably carry on snoozing. Not that 
the game's awful, It's just thai we've 
seen it all before guys, There have 
been almost as many racing games on 
home computers as shoot-'em-ups, and 
frankly these days a game has to be 
something pretty damn impressive to 
stand out In the crowd, One for diehard 
enthusiasts only. 
Machine Update 51% 

AMSTRAD CPC 

Eliminator 

HEWSON ■ £9.99 cass, £14.99 disk 
Al&ri ST $2% — TGMD 1 1 . Amiga 84% — 
TGMQ15. Spectrum 79% - TGM01B 

The blocky artd rather gaudily coloured 
sprites don't bode too well tor the CPC 
version of this game, and first impre 
sions aren't helped by explosions from 
incinerated enemy craft lingering 
onscreen too long. But the action is 
fast, the enemy enthusiastic and ihe 
going tough. It still rales In gameplay, 
but the Amstrad version is definitely lag- 
ging behind the others. 
Machine Update 67% 




TGM TX 022:9-89 85 



It's u megab- er, a hot shoot-'em-up 



m 


Fil 


■ 1 



Impressions 



.is themselves escaped 
the wrath of Mirror soft Imageworks 
in a recent software wrangle. 
Because the shoot-'em-up section 
of this game bore a marked resem- 
blance to the forthcoming Bitmap 
Brothers game. Xenon II — MegabfasU 
one or two changes {thankfully minor) 
were required before Mirrorsoft s solici- 
tors were satisfied that the two games 
were adequately dissimilar And so the 
story of the Chariots Ot Wrath can be 
told. 

Vou are Prince Agar 
of the Forgotten 
Kingdom, a fearsome 
warrior whose sup- 
posed barbaric ; 

actions have led to 
the king command- . 
ing you to remain 
within the royal J 
castle's con- 
fines. Aside J 
irom the tedi- 



um 

restraining 
your macho, battle-hungry body, the sit- 
uation worsens when your betrothed 
gels kidnapped by the Baron. You treat 
the dilemma as any hero would and go 
in pursuit of your princess (well there 
wouldn't be much of as game if you 
didn't). 

Standing in a castle corridor, various 
defendants try and slop you Irom leav- 
ing. As they jump out from behind walls 




you aim your light-bolt gun with 
crosshairs, each adversary needing 
multiple hits to destroy. 

To simulate breaking through the cas- 
tle battlements you play a Break-Out 
game, with the now obligatory bonus 
pods to collect and baddies to avoid — 
here in the shape of arrows. 

For the main sections of the game 
you take to your spacecraft and baltle 
through vertically scrolling scenes, 
whereupon all forms of enemy open 
fire, both stationary 
as pari of the land- 
scape and mobile 
as pari of a flight 
formation. A 

\ weapons pod 

,v-1* 4 M occasionally rolls 



(or increased 

firepower, mov- 

Jng outriders, 

. multiples 

Defeating 
the end -of - 
level blob leads to another Break-Out 
screen, then a horizontal scroller where 
you collect energy pods to fuel the ship. 
They must be collected within a time 
limit, and falling from one of the precari- 
ous platforms on which they lie is only 
all too easy to do. 

Vou then proceed to another vertical 
shoot-'em-up section which is followed 
by a simple Asteroids clone. The game 



i t I l IV -J 



progresses, slotting in the various sub- 
games in between the vertical scroller, 
unfit the Baron s castle Is reached and 
your beloved rescued. 

Impressions obviously though) a 
shoot-'em-up in Itself just wasn't 
enough, While the shoot-out in the corri- 
dor is quite enjoyable and reasonably 
appropriate to the cliched fantasy sci-fi 
scenario, a Break-Out stage is a strange 
and unwanted choice of bonus. The 
platform stages lime limit is too tight 
and the margin for error too small, and 
it s most infuriating to be sent back to 
the start of the stage when you fall or 
run out of time. 

Thankfully, it's worth fighting through 
whatever faults the low-key sections 
have because the shoot- em -up Is 
indeed a great blaster. It s by no means 
original but graphical presentation is 
near faultless and play ability is high, 
putting unusual opponents over imagi- 
native backgrounds to be blasted away 
by often VERY heavy firepower. 

We wait with breathe duly baited for 
Xenon II — Megablast. bul in the mean- 
time Chariots of Wrath is a quality 
shoot-'em-up, complete with interlude 
stages, which is bound to satisfy. 




■ •' .R'--- 



mm 

rrrTiriTi 



€"■* Ti 



'.MA.LT 



ATARI ST 








*9k\ iMOOcecmMc 



By no means original but graphical 




y^fmmfw^^T^T 



yability 



The characters in the first section, the 
shoot-out, are bright and characterful 
and their instantaneous appear- and 
disappearances lend a nice cartoon- 
like air. The platform stages sprite is 
crude and blocky. though, and the 
background graphics for that scene, 
like the Break-Out variant's graphics, 
are unsophisticated and rather drab. 
This is more than made up for with the 
blaster, with bold and colourful sprites 
and backgrounds and smooth three- 
layer parallax scrolling. The graphics 
in the second shoot-'em-up level are 
brilliantly defined — a huge crab and 
frog in the background, realistically 
drawn, and superbly shaded turtles 
attack. The amount of objects 
onscreen when firepower is built up is 
quite impressive, and even though 
things noticeably slow down at times, 
It never fails to be a hectic blaster. 
Sampled spot effects are adequate 
and forgettable, but the music isn't 
bad at all. A pricey but entertaining 
game. 

OTHER FORMATS 

Amiga, also at £24.99. 



86 TGM TX022:9-89 




YOTR EYES ONLY + URGENT + TOUR 
PREVIOUS ATTEMPTS TO CAPTURE 




♦ ATTENTION ALL 064 » CPC OWNERS ♦ FOR 
MACHINE IS ABOUT TO BE TAKEN HOSTAGE + 
16 BTT MACHINES SUCCESSFUL ♦ TOP SECRET REPORTS *OLLOW ♦ 









ST ACTION December 198a 

"t can find absolutely nothing to unit in HOSTAGES - it realty is- state-of-the-art software', it has ext ellent 
graphics and atmospherh ^ound, and the game itself fa totally engrossing. Infogrames have taken a 
teeming!) impossible theme, and have created a veritable masterpiece" 

ATARI ST USER lanuary 1989 Star Came 

"The gameptay is totally addictive, graphii s outstanding and sound effects thrilling. Definitely an exen fae 
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ST AMIGA FORMAT October 1988 

"HOSTAGES manages to effectively capture (hi- edgy realism of an armed siege >*t> it you're ii 
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HOSTAGES quite a liberating experience'" 

THE ONE October 1988 

*..*siiek graphics and on-screen presentation ... HOSTAGES is a well-poltshed program. Gameplay. ttxi, is 
involved and compelling ,., should prove a satisfying challenge ktrquHe some time* 

ACE December 1988 

"Fun to play and will have you on the edge ot vow seat..." 

THE GAMES MACHINE December 1988 

"the at tion in Hi fSFAGES really gets the adrenalin going, Graphics and sound are uswf vt'kn tt\eh to 
t reate a gripping atmosphere" 

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Reviews 



A night on the tiles 



BEAM 



Magic Bytes 

In a mysterious artificial world far away 
from our own, you have been chosen 
to battle through 27 levels packed 
with lethal dangers never before wit- 
nessed by sane man. But there's no 
time to waste fretting about what lies ahead 
of you as you leap into the cockpit of your 
streamlined battle craft and prepare for 
some action. 

After a choree of playing either solo or 
against a friend, you're faced by a screen 
filled with blocks (which have various func- 
tions), energy stations and very vicious 
killer pods The aim of each level is to con- 
nect the energy stations to one another 
under the dubious attention of tiles and 
killer pods. Many tiles are stationary, includ- 
ing dead stones (kill on contact), magnets 
and friction tiles. Mobile hazards include 
movers. alko( hie) holies and stoppers. Few 
tiles (apart from the deads) do you any real 
damage, they stow you down enough to 
allow the killer pods to attack. 

How to play? On the job, head for the 
orange coloured energy station and whack 
into it. Your craft turns orange, so whizz to 
the empty station opposile it and — hey 
presto — a beam of laser energy links 
them. Carry on fike this until all the energy 




£9,99 [ 


^tA»-»L^» 


cass 


^^^^-^^■^^ 




£14.99 disk 



As colourful as its 16-bit cousins, this 
is one of those cases where for some 
indefinable reason the technically 
lesser machine has the better game in 
playabilily 



OTHER FORMATS 

No other versions are planned. 



'Five and seven, fifty-seven. 



BOB'S FULL HOUSE 



TV Gam.es/Doma rlc 



nyone remember the good old days 
of Celebrity Squares, when Bob had 
just began his career as a quiz show 
host? From the money- filled brief- 
case of that glorified noughts and 

crosses via Mr Babbage, the Family 

Fortunes display computer, Mr Monkhouse 

has reached the dubious heights of hosting 

Opportunity Knocks, so Bob Says. Then, of 

course, there's his Futt House... 
For one to four players, the computer 

makes up for any 

lacking numbers, 

Each player has a 

bingo card with 15 

numbers which are lit 

by answering various 

factual but often trivial 

questions. 
In round one, the 

aim is to light the four 

corners of your bingo 

card. A question is 

asked in the text area 

at the bottom of the 

screen and the first 

person to press their 

buzzer (an allotted 



key) enters the answer via the keyboard. 
To help you. the answer is marked out with 
dashes and spaces (like Hangman), An 
incorrect answer throws the question open 
to the buzzer again and you're 'wallied' — 
unable to answer the next question. These 
rules also apply to rounds two and three. 

The middle line of your card is the target 
in round two, where each player is asked 
questions individually. Card numbers cor- 
respond to different categories (which 




There's little to choose between the 
two 16-bit games, but shading on the 
Amiga is a touch subtler than the ST s, 
and the in-game tune is heartwarming- 
ly good. 



stations are finked, then prepare to tackle 

the next level, 

For the first few games Beam certainly 
makes you realise how rich in cuss words 



change occasionally), so the number you 

chose determines Ihe subject. 

ft's a Free-for-all, quick-fire round next 
until someone completes their card and 
wins the game. They go on to Ihe Golden 
Bingo Card, where there are 15 questions 
to answer in one minute. On a correct 
answer the ciock stops and a number nom- 
inated to either gain the equivalent in cash 
or reveal a letter. The letters, with luck, 
eventually spell out the location of a holi- 
day. 

As opposed to A Question Of Sport, 
Bob's Futt House varies little from just 



£7.95 



O 



The title music bursts forth as the 
game, with great eventuality, finishes 
loading. This piece and the in-game 
jingles are fun and well composed — 
audio is the game's best feature, A 
robotically animaled Bob face cap- 
tures some of the character of the man 
when questions are being displayed, 
but the angled view of the contestants 
shows them as an ugly mass of pixels 
Their portraits are quite amusing, how- 
ever, despite overly comical definition. 
A weird little creature unique to the 
C64 version is Acid House Mouse', a 
black rodent who prances around the 
contestants' desks. 



9GTGM TX022:9-89 



your vocabulary is. The anarchic ship zips 
around the screen so wildly that for the first 
few attempts you bash into the baddies 
more than the other way round, But veter- 
ans of other such seemingly uncontrollable 
games as Asteroids. Qids and Thrust will 
soon pick it up Although tough at the out- 
set. Beam provides a fairly stiff challenge to 
those willing to persevere with the frustrat- 
ing controls. 
MC 

A night on the tiles is acceptable fun on 
the ST (left) and Amiga (below) 




£24.99 



Beam is a very colourful game with 
pretty backdrops, vicious Killer Pods 
and annoying tiles. The tune which 
plays throughout the game does tend 
to become teeth gratingly annoying 
after a while, but the volume button 
soon sorts (his out. 





nnaffli! 




A full house on the C54 (beiow left) and 
the Amstrad (above) 

straightforward questions and answers so 
is easy to translate effectively to computer 
Clear displays of bingo cards and ques- 
tions are all that's necessary to capture the 
essence of playing Bob's game but TV 



£7.95 



o 



The rectangular shape of bingo cards 
allows easy use of colour without risk 
of colour clash, but the LCD-style seg- 
mented numbers make an irritating 
mass of small angular shapes. The 
black-and-white faces are reasonable 
but could have been more carefully 
drawn and better animated. The 
sound's crude even for a Spectrum. 



Games have put a heavy emphasis on 
keyboard skills; multiple choice answers 
would have been tar superior tor most 
gamesplayers 

The questions themselves are loaded 
separately from the main program — 
much waiting is involved here. This would 
be bearable if not for the fad that the 
questions soon repeat themselves, a faurt 
which will hopefully be rectified with ques 
tion data-cassettes. 

As a one-player game, Bob's Full 
House is of little interest, bul with friends 
the competitive spirit jollies things along 
for a while, Ultimately, the limited question 
range and essential typing skills spoil the 
possible value of the product. Sorry, TV 
Games, you've been wallied 
WL 



£7.95 



While not overwhelming in the colour 
department, the Amstrad s graphics 
are very neatly and clearly done, 
making it the most visually pleasing 
version. Although the contestants 
lack detail, Bob's visage is large and 
is a great pixelisation (if you'll 
excuse the word), but all people 
twitch nervously as it restraining a 
sneeze. Considering the CPCs 
sound limitations, the theme tune is 
a good rendition of the TV original, 




v;:-;^t u. 



PC 
STARRAY 

Logolron £29.99 

Amiga 79% — TGM 011 

In this Defender-inspired game cyan and dark 
blue are the predominant colours (even in EGA 
mode), and withoul a joystick it's tough to play 
because the keyboard functions are difficult to 
master, There are several Defender-style 
games on the market, unfortunately StarRay on 
the PC isn't one of the better ones. 
Machine update 58% 

AMIGA 
SDI 

ACT! VISIONS £24.99 

Alan ST 56% — TGMOU, Spectrum 37%. Commodore 

64 56%. Amstrad CPC 29% — TGMQie 

Taken from the Sega Global Defense, SDI 
boasts impressive graphics and professional 
presentation, but this does little to disguise the 
thin and repetitive gamepiay — something It 
has in common with the ST version In fact the 
major differences — as is so often the case — 
are to be found in the ingame tunes and sound 
effects, Little more than a modernised Missile 
Command, S£W looks good but doesn't lasta 
the same. 
Machine Update 57% 

COMMODORE 64/128 

American Indoor Soccer 

Ml N DSC APE ■ £9.99 Cass, £14,99 

PC 69% — TGM022 

Chubby players look like adolescent girl players, 
complete with hockey skirts, and run like they're 
wearing wellies full of custard. That is. 
someone scores, then half the sprites run 
around in a simualcrum of a Benny Hill scene. 
Effects and music are both very basb and are 
from somewhere in the early, early days 3f C64 
gaming. Happily, this is one of those quality 
strategy/management games with a touch of 
arcade, meaning that depth outweighs any visu- 
als/aural) weaknesses. 
Machine update 66% 

SPECTRUM ■ AMSTRAD CPC ■ ATARI ST 

Dominator 

SYSTEM 3 Atari ST £19.99 
8-bils £9.99 cass, £14.99 

Amiga 87%. Commodore 64 87% — TGM0E0 

No surprise from the ST: graphics of the same 
unusual design as the Amiga but a little lacking 
in detail, though scrolling and movement is fine. 
The Spectrum assigns different colours to neat 
scenery and different types of ship which gen- 
erally works quite well. Near -misses with other 
objects sometimes cause attribute problems, 
however, and player missiles and resulting 
explosions are often ot bizarre and changing 
colouration. Amstrad graphics are not a pretty 
sight. Although scenery uses colour well, It 
scrolls slowly and jerkily while blocky sprites 
take part in a game too awkward and boring to 
play. Sound on all versions is average for the 
particular machine but CPC ejects are notably 
poor — piercing and messy, 

Amstrad CPC owners steer clear; otherwise. 
Dominator is another in the long, long (long) 
line of decent but unremarkable shool-'em-ups. 
Machine update: Atari ST 75% 
Spectrum 68% 
Amstrad CPC 40% 



TGM TX 022:9-89 91 



Reviews 



A new head-scratching maze 



LEONARDO 



Start yte 

Judging from its title, you could be 
excused for thinking, as we did at 
first, that Leonardo is the latest art 
utility. In fact he's the game's anti- 
hero, a roguish character whose only 
aesthetic quality is the highly illegal and 
morally dubious 'aif of burglary. With a 
taste for jewels and gams, cash and coins, 
he must tread carefully as he gather his loot 
for fear of capture by the law — or even 
ghosts! 

Each of the 50 maze- 1 ike four-way 
scrolling levels has boulders interrupting his 
stealth-footed path but he has the consider 
able strength necessary to move them. His 
muscle is so great that they Keep moving till 
they hit another object, sending the ghost 
or guard back to their home within the level 
— the Watchman Lodge — if timed proper- 
ly. He can even crush the hunks of rock into 
dust! 

His pushing power is essential to com- 
plete levels. The main type of treasure on 
each level is gathered together in a line, a 
task requiring planning, strategy and judi- 
cious positioning/demolition of boulders. 

Movement around levels is assisted by 
manhole covers — an 'in' cover transports 
Leo instantly to an "ouf — and a radar 
device. Leo, the treasures to be gathered 
and the bad guys are shown on the radar 
screen but. as Leo made it himself, it often 
malfunctions, 



A heavy cross to bear on the dusty grail 



Objects to find on each level include valu- 
ables for extra points, anti -guard dynamite 
to send ghosts and guards to the Lodge, 
and paralysing rock to temporarily freeze 
them. 

Leonardo has strong similarities with 



Logotron's Xor and its sequel, Prospector 
in she Mazes of Xor, mixed with a touch of 
Bouiderdash. Starbytes release has fewer 
puzzle elements than Xor bul is still as 
brain-testing through the difficulty of gath- 
ering treasures in a line. There's little time 
to stop and think with the marauding ghost 
and guard tracking you and a time limit for 
the level, so the destination tor treasures 
has to be calculated while on the move. 

This game is far from easy and often 
frustrating, bul if you think you can lackle 
head -scratching manipulative puzzles 
while dodging relentless enemies, 
Leonardo will keep you happily and busily 
occupied for hours. 
WL 




INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE 



US Gold 

^^T| 5 Gold's last Indy game was a dis- 
I appointment, and there must be 

I something in the theme that jinxes 

I games designers, because — it 

k*»» has to be said at the outset — this 

newest one is its equal in the let-down 

stakes. 

If you have seen the film, you'll be able 
to identify the obvious game sequences, 
as Indy Jnr (the lad), Indy Jnr {the man) 
and Jones Snr tackle the Nazis in the 
attempt to get the Holy Grail first. The 
game has lour distinctive levels, first set 
back in 1912 where the teenage boy scout 
Indy discovers a group of treasure looters 
m a spooky cavern searching for the Cross 
of Coronado. Indy, of course, must find it 
first.,, and escape. 

Obstacles natural (falling stalactites, 
chasms etc) and man-made (coltapsing 
bridges and the thugs) thwart his plans, 
But escape with the Cross he does, onto a 
circus train where he discovers his phobia 
of snakes and that a whip is useful to divert 
a lion's attentions, 

Thence to 1936 as World War II looms, 
and the adult Indy is searching Castle 



Brunwald tor the Knights Templar's shield 
which should offer clues as to the where- 
abouts of the Grail in the Jordanian desert. 
It was here, in the film, that Indy rescued 
his father (admirably played by Sean 
Connery in the movie, but sadly lacking In 
the game). Nazi troops, rats, fireballs and 
lightning make reaching level three — the 
Zeppelin — difficuli. 

Aware of his presence, the Nazis order 
the airship taking Indy out of Germany to 
return, and the search is on for Dr Jones 
Snr's diary containing his notes on where 
to find the Grail. As Indy wanders through 
the Zeppelin looking for a handy plane to 
escape in, he must top up his supply of 
passports (Indy fans know what happens to 
people without tickets') because if the 
passport icon in the display panel disap- 
pears completely an alarm sounds and all 
hell is let loose. 

The final level is set In the temple where 
the Grail resides, guarded by those 
whirring blades, collapsing tiles and the 
rest. 

Digitized pictures of Indy add the best 
touch to what is a very average platform 



game. After all the hype it was fair to 
expect something special, but although 
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is 
graphically reasonable, its predictable 
gameplay sags, leaving only frustration 
when Indy gets killed tor the umpteenth 
time. Were hoping for something much 
more exciting from the Lucasfilm adventure 
game. 
MC 




£S,99 
cass, 
£12.99 disk 

Predictably monochrome (and not 
necessarily a drawback), colour Isn't 
the onty missing thing: what happened 
to the stalactites that plague the first 
level of the 16- bit versions? More seri- 
ously, why Is Indy an adult and not a 
boy scout? Movement is also on the 
slow side especially when Indy whips 
a bad guy; not very impressive. 



92 TGM TXQ22:9-89 





Reminiscent of Boulderdash. Leonardo 
can give you pause for thought — Amiga 



£19,99 



In a clever intro sequence Leonardo 
walks up to his house and smokes a 
cigarette before entering and switch- 
ing on a neon sign. He's an amusing 
sprite and well animated — the guard 
is of equal quality but the ghost is 
roughly drawn. Backgrounds are 
gaudy patterns which don't help con- 
centration, but walls and objects are 
adequately fashioned Sound effects 
are weak, what few of them there are, 
but music is wei! composed — busy 
yet soothing. 




Disappointing : the young ino'ygets cross 



£19.99 



Throughout, its graphical detail leaves 
much to be desired — Indy sliding 
across the floor without moving his 
legs and the amazing static waves on 
Level One which surely could have 
been animated. These omissions 
apply to all versions of this drearily 
repetitious game. 





£19.99 



Although the entire screen area is 
used, graphics are only marginal ly 
improved — most noticeable in the 
game intro, Sound is vastly improved, 
however: three tunes that are not only 
very well written but also use great 
sounds. Fantastic stufl. On the minus 
side, the bad guys are taster than on 
the ST version, making a difficult 
game tougher still. Ah well, them's the 
breaks. 



OTHER FORMATS 

C64 (£9,99} and PC (E19.99) over the 
next couple of months. 



£9.99 

cass. 




4.99 disk 



A colourful loading screen promises a 
good game, but its actual appearance 
makes it look like a direct port over 
from the Spectrum — and movement 
is even slower, with Indy swashbuck- 
ling at the speed of a crippled snail. 
See the movie, but approach the game 
with caution. 



£19 99 



Additions to the ST game are a couple 
of extra sound effects, such as the 
Indy walking on cornflakes' effect 
when he moves. The same's true with 
the admittedly nice digitized pictures 
— but how much nicer some real 
gameplay would have been. 

OTHER FORMATS 

Expect the CS4 (C9.99/E 14,99) and PC 
(E24.99) versions any day. 




commotes; 



AMIGA ■ PC 
Kult 

EXXOS £24.95 

J T 94% — TGM02O 

With all the great visuals ol the ST origi- 
nal, the Amiga version has a slightly 

larger play area and subtly different 
colour palette- The same clever sound 
effects have been used and there's aiso 
a nicely composed Jean Michel 
Jarre-style title music, brimming with 
good instrument samples. It's a shame 
similar compliments can't be given to 



.... i Zi.r.ii i.j HH^H 


4m$ ;ii 


■vaafiaJB^Kj^l.' 


EKiWtiR '& 


ft.) i • 




! ■ J 


™™™™™ 



the PC. Other than Hercules Mono- 
chrome, only CGA graphics mode is 
supported. While purple and cyan suit 
some ol the stranger biological crea- 
tures and everything is welt drawn, EGA 
would have generated a much better 
playing atmosphere. Effects are percus 
sive bleeps of acknowledgment. 
For both versions, though, the brain- 
strainlng, head -scratching puzzles have 
been reproduced wholly unscathed 
trom the Atari, and that is certainly 
enough recommendation for purchase. 
Machine update: Amiga 85% 
S1«Vo 



ATARI STB AMIGA 

Rick Dangerous 

FIREBIRD £24.99 

Spectrum 79%, Commodore 64 Si V Amstrad 

CPC 76% — TGMD20 

Although the scenes surrounding our 
jovial junior Indy scroll intermittently — 
and then (erkily — they make good use 
of colour, with effectively shaded rocks, 
wood and so on. Detail is packed into 
the sprites and gives them a cartoon 
flavour. Title music is simple yet 
fun. and effects samples include a great 
nchocheting pistol shot and an amusing 
Waaaaghh! as a killed character falls 
off screen. The playing area is actually 
a little smaller on the Amiga., almost 
square. Title musk; Is irritating — poor 
sounds — and there s the addition of an 
inappropriate jump effect. It's expensive 
for what it offers but. Rick Dangerous is 
a good, old-fashioned, highly-playable 
arcade exploration jaunt- 
Machine update: Amiga 76% 
Atari ST 78% 




TGM TX 022:9-89 93 



Reviews 



machine 



Nightmare on fun street 



FIENDISH FREDDY'S BIG TOP 0' FUN 



Mindscape 

Having been sacked for incompe- 
tence Freddy the clown has decid- 
ed to take revenge on the circus, a 
task simplified by its financial diffi- 
culties with a bank loan If 10.000 
dollars isn't eamt very soon (ie tonight), the 
big top will be forced to close.., perm ana fit- 
ly (sob). 

You, the player, guide six of the circus's 
various artistes and attempt to perform as 
spectacularly as possible so as to draw in 
the crowds and pay off the debt. Meanwhile 
Fiendish Freddy does his level best to spoil 
the acts. 

in Diving you attempt to dive artistically 
into a recepticat, while Freddy interferes by 
using a large electric fan to blow you side- 
ways. Juggling takes place on a unicyde as 
you catch balls and clubs thrown by a seal 
and press fire to launch an object into the 
air when your hands are full. Freddy occa- 
sionally tempts the seal away with a fish, 
allowing him lo throw bis own items your 
way — a missile or fizzing bomb! 

On the Trapeze a well-timed button press 
sends you through the air to catch hold of 
the next flying trapeze. Freddy pilots a 
strange flying contraption and if you're too 



£29.99 



It has to be admitted that in a number 
of places frames of animation are tack- 
ing and steps in movement are jerky. 
This doesn't matter, though. Amid 
huge, brilliantly drawn sprites per- 
forming all sorts of wild and wacky 
deeds, any faults disappear. Music is 
jolly and has an authentic circus atmo- 
sphere while sampled effects are fit- 
tingly silly. On the expensive side but 
truly an Interactive computer cartoon. 





slow he snips the trapeze wires with the 
giant scissors built into its front I 

In Knife -throwing the object is to burst bal- 
loons tied to a revolving board, but it's all too 
easy to mistime and hit the lean, lightly 
tanned body of the dumb broad who's 
allowed herself to be manacled to it, — 
especially when a certain maniacal down 
throws a bomb at the giant wheel? 

You can balance on the Highwire while 
Freddy throws bombs in your direction, and 
round off the performance by jumping into a 
squat cannon for gun powder-powered 
flight. The safety net is a rather unforgiving 
device, to say the least — it's a brick wall, 
and it's position is quickly set or Freddy 
arrives. Too siow and he blocks the cannon 
with a giant cork, causing it to backfire with 
explosive results. 

So soon after the excellent Circus 
Attractions (TGM020J no-one couldve pre- 
dicted the appearance of another multi- 



event big fop game, let alone one better 
and more fun than the Golden Goblins 
release Quality is assured here Chris 
Gray, who wrote Infiltrator and co-created 
the all-time classic Bou'derdas, was the 
leader of the team who created Freddys 
antics, 

There are many, many humorous parts 
within the gameplay but we haven't the 
space to describe them here; they're a 
delight you'll discover tor yourself. As a 
one-player game it would soon become 
tiresome, but with a group of friends — up 
to five people can take part — it's a great 
source of entertainment and a unique piece 
of software which everyone should see 

WL 



OTHER FORMATS 

Atari ST and PC (Amiga price) wilhin 
the month. 



Join the rotory club! 

MR HELI 

Firebird 

The hero of this push scroll shoot- 
'em-up is an aimiabte. rotund man- 
helicopter, a member of the Cosmic 
Heli Patrol called upon to save the 
innocent inhabitants ol a distant and 
idyll ically green planet. 

'The Muddy' — a bizarrely- named mad 
scientist — leads a band of twisted follow 
ers with a predilection for destroying life in 
whatever form ihey find it- It's your job to 
help man- 'copter Mr Heli do it to them 
before the mudders — as they're colloquial- 
ly known — do il to the animals. 

The scrolling is mostty horizontal but 
sometimes vertical. Heli begins with for- 
ward- and upward-firing cannon to destroy 
enemies, but blasting certain destructible 
parts o* the scenery reveals blue crystals. 



Collected, the crystals are worth dollars to 
be spent at single- product shops. These too 
are initially hidden within rock walls, but 
when hovered upon, with enough money, 
bonuses are gained. 

It's rare these days to find an air/space 
shoot-'em-up that push scrolls, so at least 
with that in mind Mr Heli has some originali- 
ty. Excuse it, though, and the game is very 
similar to Level One of )) Blood Mo ney((. It's 
a shame it isn't as enjoyable as that 90% 
Star Ptayer (TQH019). Mr Heli never rises 
above average, the vague attempt at a cute 
progressive shoot-'em-up failing dismally, 
and no substitute for unusual menacing 
monsters. Although the various displays 
take up little screen area, when combined 
with the bulky scenery the game plays quite 
ciaustrophobically and there's never 
enough room to manoeuvre properly. 
WL 



OTHER FORMATS 

Spectrum, CG4, Amstrad and Amiga all 
available soon, at standard full-price. 





£19-99 



The two- layer parallax scrolling is jud- 
dery and sprite movement a bit jerky. 
The graphical highlight is the cute way 
Mr Heli walks when on the ground 
Although the background is a nice 
happy ditty t bog-standard ST sounds 
are used, as are those used for effects, 
so the soundtrack is spoiled. 



- .!</*! ......... 



Mf" 1 - 



>* .*■ ,*■ r v- r P*F^ ,^ 



rrjitji^t*g r 



94 TGM TX021 :8-89 







YOUR BOY IS PITCHED INTO THE 
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ONE AMBITION. TO BE THE WORLD'S N 
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FAIR TRADING ACT 1973 

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Under this Act Give Pulman. of 9 Copperfield Galena, 
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selling computer software by mail ard*r, has given the Director 
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which they are legally entitled. 

These assurances also apply to any other business with which 
Clive Pulman may be involved at any time. 

The Director General of Fair Trading can take further action if 
the assurances are not Ikept. Consumers who have reason to 
behe ye that the assurances have been broken should contact: 

J Hooker Esq 

Chief Trading Staiwlards Officer 

London Borough of Havering 

Langton's Cottage 

Billet Lane 

Homchurch 

Essex RMM I XL 



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AMSTRAD TAPE DISK 

Afflien Service 7.90 12.50 

Aflertwrner 7.9} tZ.M 

Balks* Kr«gwa 7 M ts.5C 

Barbarian II 7.90 12,50 

Ai*an*d II 6.75 12.S0 

Ctwrtbusters. 7.BO 

Cosmic Pirates 7.90 IS 50 

Dark Fusion 7.90 12.S0 

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SOFTWARE 
SNAX 



NIGHTDAWN 

Magic Bytes ■ Atari ST £24.99, 
Amiga £24.99, Commodore 64 
£9.99 cass. £14.99 disk 

Nightdawn: a sharp, geometric, synthetic 
world, a mere projection of a designer's 

imagination but a visible, tangible, audible 
planet. Sitting in a cybernetic control centre, 
you view a robot tank from above, dropped 
by a freighter onto Platform One, a vast 
network of corridors floating unaided over 
the surface of Nightdawn. Your aim is sim- 
ply to find the exit which leads to the next 
platform level 

Gates prevent progress, but collecting 
keys and then passing over the matching 
switch alleviates the situation. Laser barri- 
ers have on/off switches, as do escalators, 
but of greater concern are minefields, laid 




Hardiy a new dawn: ST version 

by a mobile, and a patrolling robot 

'Kits are occasionally found to improve 
your tank. A double cannon arms your ini- 
tially defenceless vehicle, mine detector 
reveals concealed mines, and exit indicator 
and radar both help you escape. 
Nightdawn is a maze shoot-'em-up which 
puis the emphasise on key collecting and 
navigating. 

Simple bas-relief platforms hover over 
similarly mediocre ground patterns in the 
near- identical ST and Amiga games, The 
parallax scrolling is smooth and swift in the 
vertical plane but jerks horizontally. Sprites 
are plain, the tank being weedy and placid 
in appearance. Average ST audio but the 
Amiga has a brilliantly over-the-top set ot 
effects samples. 

Graphics are simpler still on the C64 and 
with 1(5 long history of bas-relief Nightdawn 
should be more than just bfocky angles. 
Sprites are no better — the robot tank is 
nothing short of pathetic 

Much better suited to a budget label, it's 
too old-fashioned and derivative for its own 
good. WL 

Machine rating: Atari ST 42% 
Amiga 44% 
Commodore 64/128 36% 




CSive Barker would turn in his setf-m&de 
□rave // he saw the game associated with 
nl$ cinematic creation 

HELLRAISER 

ExocetH Atari ST £19.95 

Completely unconnected with Olive Barkers 
movie of the same name, the Hellraisers 
are a motley crew of humans, aliens, 
cyborgs, robots and Sun readers who 
spend their time drinking, throwing parties, 
fighting, eating, watching Postman Pat 
videos, and oppressing poor defenceless 
planets. An elite ol the Liberator Corps, 
you're dealing with their latest raid . 

For one or two players, the screen is split 
horizontally to give individual side views of 
building corridors, Sectors threethrough five 
are being taken over by Hellraisers to be 
eliminated as you try to find the exit. There 
you find a Wasp battle cruiser to clear the 
horizontally scrolling airspace of Hellraiser 
ships. Circular symbols are collected for 
such handy add-ons as bombs or a long- 
range laser. 

This may be a two-pan game but it cant 
disguise the fact that it's a crude rehash of 
old and overused ideas. The corridor sec- 
tion looks similar to Psygnosis s Obliterator, 
but doesn't play like it because the hero 
isn't capable ol as many actions. 
'Honzontally scrolling shoot-'em-up' is really 
all there can be said about the other plain 



and instantly forgettable half of the game. 

Plain backgrounds of few colours only 
serve to make the limp cruiser shoot-'em- 
up worse still. Smooth scrolling is offset by 
drab sprites and the whole game is scarred 
with cliched ST sound effects, terrible 
music and inexplicably lengthy repeated 
loading. WL 

Machine rating 34% 



ALIEN LEGION 

Gainstar ■ Amiga £24.95 

Yup, Earth's been caught with its pants 
down again by a race of psycholic aliens 
bent on universal domination. With all the 
soldiers in pnson and the population 
clamped under the green, slimy iron heel 
only lantern-jawed Captain Cosmose and 
his trusty laser gun are left to oppose the 
mechanised might of the galactic con- 



■v. , 9. 






l'^.^J^^l^.'V^^ 



Trying to be Exolon, but failing to deliver... 

querors. 

Cosmose leaps around many platforms, 
attacked by the alien legions of the title. 
They include eyeballs on stalks, fellas in 
red spacesuits with green visors (nice) and 
rotating spheres. 

Destroyed aliens occasionally drop vials 
containing either red or green liquid. Red 
reduces Cosmoses energy level, green 
raises it. 

Two words sum up Alien Legion: very 
average. Colourful but comatose, 

Cosmose wandering around the screen 
shooting at the odd alien rapidly becomes 
dismal entertainment, A mediocre Exolon- 
type game that fails to deliver enough to 
warrant the price tag, MC 

Machine rating 36% 



GHOSTBUSTERS 

SegaB £29.95 

It's been a long, long time since this game 
was first released to become one of the 
best selling computer games of all ttme. 
Despite public acclaim, tew reviews really 
rated it and after all this time it hasn't been 
improved for its Sega debut 

The rendition of the familiar 
Ghostbusters music is horrendous! Even 
when its in tune the dire sounds used 
ensure a very necessary adjustment of the 
volume control, Graphics are, without 
exception, feeble and drab. There's a lot of 
sprite flicker but at least the scrolling in the 
car section is smooth. The inclusion of the 
extra scenes to defeat Gorza is a good 
idea, as is the shop, allowing equipment to 
be purchased whenever viable, but five 




Old, and if anything, worse than before 

ghosts per building makes busting too awk- 
ward and frustrating, 

Ghostbusters is an old and simple game 
anyway, but with poor graphics and sound, 
and worse gameplay, you won't wanna call 
Sega's Ghostbusters. WL 

Machine rating 22% 



96 TGM TX022:9-89 



Short Reviews 



SKATE OF THE 
ART 

Line I ■ Amiga £19.99 

it's no surprise to cool radical dudes to find 
that in Skate of the Art your graphic coun- 
terpart must tackle the wood's most difficult 
skateboard course — to become the u Hi- 
mate 'boarder 20 horizontally- scrolling lev- 
els are littered with various obstacles to be 
negotiated using the moves at your dispos- 
al. Against a time limit, points are awarded 




The main sprite Is far from rad — blue 
dungarees, yellow shirt, red baseball 
cap.. .not helped by his plain definition 
end poor animation 

tor stunts and a quick finish. 

Bonus screens involve such strange pas- 
times as skateboard hurdles and crossing a 
pole by sliding on the perpendicular board. 
Skate of the Art plays, and partly looks, Ike 
a cross between Metrocross, Kikstart and, 
more recently. Super Scramble Simulator 
The scenery scrolls happily and smoothly 
by while moves have to be correctly select- 
ed and timed — not exactly complicated, 
brain-teasing action. 

This simple, old-fashioned, repetitive 
game would be dubious value for money if 
competently programmed, but poor graph 
ics and awkward gameplay mean it'd still 
be overpriced at £10. Even, or perhaps 
especially, skateboard fans should avoid 
this WL 

Machine rating 30% 



THE BASEBALL 

Segaa £24.95 

Hzve you heard ol Reggie Jackson? No? 
Then Sega UK chose correctly to remove 
all traces of the man who endorsed this 
game in the US. 

There are 26 teams in memory and they 
can be chosen to set up one-player, two- 
player or demo games, When a human 
takes pan he can select whether fielders 
move automatically or are under his control 
and who pitches. 

In a match, the pitcher can select his 
favourite throw, or use a curve shot. The 
pitcher can be substituted if desired. The 
batter can move left and right on his square 
and adjust his swing height. 

The Baseball boasts some quality 
speech (for an 8-bit machine) and lots of it: 
the lively shouts of Strike!', Play ball!' and 
Safe!' all help generate an atmosphere 
(and there's more speech besides). The 
pitcher and batter are detailed and realisti- 
cally drawn, with animation to match, but 
fielders are indistinct (it's easy to confuse 



QUARTZ 

Firebird* Atari ST £24.99 

Remember Asteroids'? Quartz looks rather 
similar in parts. You start at the controls of a 
ship not blessed with much firepower, but 
nimble at least in dodging the large, spin- 
ning coloured balls called Hadrons which 
attack from all angles and seem to have 
minds of their own, Blasting Hadrons 
breaks them down into Quarks {not quite so 
dangerous, but they can still make a nasty 
dent in the hull of your ship), And blasting 
these releases Neutrinos, which are what 
you're after, because if enough are collect 
ed power up weapons are tacked onto your 
ship's hull including grenade launchers, 
flame throwers, bombs and extra armour. 

Now you can get down to the serious 
business of knocking the stuffing out of all 
and sundry (while avoiding the rogue 
Hadrons of course), Up to three power-ups 
can be collected at one time, so make the 
mosl of them, because as soon as the last 



, MHHH iHl*» 



r»ftj*t 



r * * .^ '- 
I ■- " *■•. 



*, *, V 



interesting graphics disguise averageness 

Hadrons destroyed you're whisked to a 

horizontally scrolling section where you 
have to avoid spinning balls trailing glowing 
tails', alien craft et a!. 

Graphically Quartz stands out, especially 
the spinning balls in the first section, and 
the power-up weapons certainly help in 
your task to clear a path, but the game fails 
to add up to anything really special although 
it is fun for a while. MC 

Machine rating 69% 



the two teams) and the crowd is just a 
mass ol flashing colours. 

It's competent but a selection of teams 
doesn't help vary the fairly simple action, 
which becomes repetitive quickly in a one- 
player game. Very nice to both took at and 
listen to, but perhaps too expensive consid 
enng the limitations of cornpulerisedtoon- 
solised sport. Wi- 

Maehine rating 72% 




Nice to look at but repetitive when it 
comes to the action out on the field 



GALAXY FORCE 

Sega ■ £29.95 

Perhaps Sega's wildest and most ground' 
breaking coin-op. with the most stomach 
churning hydraulic chair, is the space-faring 
Galaxy Force. 

As usual it's Vou against all ol Them, and 
They must be destroyed with whatever 
weaponry You can lay your hands on. 

Of the game's five levels, any of the Aral 




The 3-D routines are poor and everything 
jerks slowly forward, updating in huge 
jumps, 

four may be selected . Viewed from behind 
the player's ship, fast approaching obsta- 
cles on the 3-D perspective landscape 
should be avoided, but of course the 
biggest problems are presented by the 
enemies. The ship has both homing mis- 
siles and a machine gun to deal with them 

You could hardly expect a humble 8 bit 
Sega to come anywhere near the quality ol 
the amazing Galaxy Force arcade 
machine, especially bearing in mind the 
console's sprite flicker problem, but the 
conversion is still a great disappointment. 
It's not as if the graphics themselves are 
good. On the whole, sprites and landscape 
elements are haphazard collections of 
brightly coloured pixels, and are often 
blocky. Music and effects are standard 
Sega — thin and weedy. And gameplay is 
a merely middle-of-the-road, mildy souped 
up Buck Rogers variant, WL 

Machine rating 60% 



INNER SPACE 

CRL/lnteractive ■ Commodore 64 
£9.99 cass, £14.99 disk 

No. not a licence from the hilarious 19G7 
comedy film starring Dennis Ouaid and 
Martin Short, but a very mediocre blast- 
em-up. You're at the controls of a modestly 
equipped space craft exterminating 130 
types of alien scum inhabiting nine horizon- 
tally- and parallax -scrolling levels of inner 
space, 

They attack m waves as you attempt to 
laser them into oblivion. The destruction of 
a wave reveals a bonus pod; there are 
seven — smart bomb, shield, speed up. 
laser, photon pulser warp, extra life and — 
a sting in the tail — the loss of a craft. And 
if Ihis action isn't enough, crack your head 
on the inevitable end-of -level guardian. 
Blobby sprites and yawny gameplay con 
spire to create a comatose state, and even 
the hauntingly moody title tune fails to 
sparfc so little enthusiasm that you won't 
bother to practice enough to find whether 
there's more to this universe than life or 
anything. MC 

Machine rating 35% 



TGM TX 022:9-89 97 



I 



m 



We are proud to present an exciting new concept in computer and 
electronic entertainment publishing... 




IMAGINATION WORKSHOP is an essential 

8-page supplement which we'll be featuring in TGM every quar- 
ter, Written and designed especially for TOM by top USA com- 
puter Journalists, you will get the very latest information as It 
happens, Imagination Workshop will approach software from 
the point of view of why its fun and entertaining, not which sys- 
tem it will appear on tirst. That makes it vital for everyone, no 
matter what machine you own. Style, tastes, trends — it's all in 
Imagination Workshop, plus competitions, tree gifts and hot 
news. 

NEXT MONTH: subLogic's UFO Right Simulator ■ New Atari 
LCD games from Epyx ■ FCI's Boxxte for the Game Boy ■ New 
Vorfc Video Arcade Exhibition (Pong and Computer Wars) ■ 
Interactive Games ■ Rumours and news 

The artwork seen here Is from the original rough designs the 
New York team of Imagination Workshop provided. 
Next month — the real thing! 




■ MAKING MUSIC 

Setting up your own home music studio — we check out every- 
thing to suit all sizes of pocket 

■ IN THE PUBLIC 

DOMAIN 

A 4-page special reveals how to get 
more than just those flashy demos 
everyone else goes on about 

PLUS all the usual fea 
tures, articles and 
reviews AND a free 
Fiendish Freddy 
Poster from MIND- 
SCAPE — on sale 
from August 17 




98 TGM TX022:9-89 



EDITORIAL OFFICE 47 Gwei Hi, LtitHo*, Shropshire SY8 (OS (K84| 5851 '2 3 
Editor; Raw Kean Feature* Editor. Dominic Handy Staff tffftt*m Robin Candy, Mark 
Caswell. Wanen Lapwonh Editorial Assistant* ; Vtw VlckrsB. Caroline Blake 
Photography: Camewi Pflural. Michael Pattoson [Anetanl) Contributor: Stwitara 
Kananya, Ruth Precy, Paul Ridby. Marshal M Rosenthal lUSAI, Johr> Woods MODUCTtOH 
PfMHTMENT r 2 King SirwX Ludlow, Shropshire SYB r40lD584j 5851 13 Produciion 
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MOSCOW'S TOUGHEST DETECTIVE. CHICAGO'S CRAZIEST COR 

THERE'S ONLY ONE THING WORSE THAN MAKING THEM MAD. 
MAKING THEM PARTNERS. 

The heat is on ... and the chose is in full cry as East and West join forces to 
hunt down o Soviet drugs dealer. The two detectives; one Russian, one 
American have very different methods of capturing their prey, but together 

they face the worst of Chicago's underworld - street fights, the 
.^ 'Cleanheads' gang, gun fire -the hottest film tie-in to date- it's all 
\ action with stunning graphics - feel the heat - RED HEAT. 



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THRILLING ACTION THROUGH TIME AND SPACE 

When a guy loses his girl - he loses his mind! Now, in the Final 
Chapter, Renegade must summon all his strength and lightning 
reactions as he chases his girlfriend's captors through time itself. Fight 
against neolithic man, mediaeval knights, and the tormented undead 

from within the tombs of Ancient Egypt, Your quest finally takes you 

J BEYOND the present — to a time you'll never forget! ... but 
remember . . , your girl wonts to see you alive! 



9 EXPLOSIVE EVENTS 

JET SKIS - HOVERS - QUADS - BUGGYS • THE HILL ' 
METEORS - SUPERCATS " SPEEDBOATS - JNFLATABLES 

Hot from the Television series - the toughest, most exciting, multi- 
machine assault course to hit your screens! Simulating the skills of 
controlling the Jet Skis, the speed of the buggys, the sheer guts ond 
stamina required for The Hill and much, much more! 
Run wild - Run The Gauntlet! 




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The sun's beating down. Rock n' Roll music's 
playing, it's time for Beach Volley - let's take on the world! 

Your team travels the globe from London to Sydney 
challenging all comers in the latest craze that* sweeping 
the beaches. 

Fantastic action with varia-bte service and play controls 
as you lob the defences, try a lightning refle* short smash 
to win back your service, jump block to defend your 
match winner. 

This ts Beach Volley . - - you may e«n catch a tan! 



Ocean Software Urn tied 6 Cental Street Manchester M2 5N5 
Telephone: 061 832 6633 Telex; 669977 OCEANS G Fa*: 061 B34 065f